Why Link Species and Ecosystems? A Perspective from Ecosystem Ecology View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1995

AUTHORS

Nancy B. Grimm

ABSTRACT

Population, community, and ecosystem ecologists historically have asked different kinds of questions about nature, and as a result have defined domains of study quite differently. In this chapter, the general question “Why link species and ecosystems?” will be explored from an ecosystem ecologist’s point of view. I begin by considering the subdisciplinary distinctions in ecology: how they are reflected in questions asked, what theories underlie them, and what areas are ripe for integration. Species occur in nature as members of interactive assemblages, and their interactions may affect ecosystem functioning in either subtle or dramatic ways. Given the attention that has been paid by community ecologists to biotic interactions, does an understanding of these processes contribute to understanding ecosystem functioning? A complex stream system and conceptual model are described for the purpose of highlighting questions relevant to integrating biotic interactions, disturbance, and ecosystem functioning. Finally, some loose ideas on the themes of disturbance and stability, patchiness, and scale as potential starting points for linking species and ecosystems are given in the final section. To facilitate interaction between population/community and ecosystem/landscape ecology, units of study should be spatially based. More... »

PAGES

5-15

Book

TITLE

Linking Species & Ecosystems

ISBN

978-1-4613-5714-8
978-1-4615-1773-3

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036207686


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "familyName": "Grimm", 
        "givenName": "Nancy B.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01250244252.58", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01250244252.58"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1995", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1995-01-01", 
    "description": "Population, community, and ecosystem ecologists historically have asked different kinds of questions about nature, and as a result have defined domains of study quite differently. In this chapter, the general question \u201cWhy link species and ecosystems?\u201d will be explored from an ecosystem ecologist\u2019s point of view. I begin by considering the subdisciplinary distinctions in ecology: how they are reflected in questions asked, what theories underlie them, and what areas are ripe for integration. Species occur in nature as members of interactive assemblages, and their interactions may affect ecosystem functioning in either subtle or dramatic ways. Given the attention that has been paid by community ecologists to biotic interactions, does an understanding of these processes contribute to understanding ecosystem functioning? A complex stream system and conceptual model are described for the purpose of highlighting questions relevant to integrating biotic interactions, disturbance, and ecosystem functioning. Finally, some loose ideas on the themes of disturbance and stability, patchiness, and scale as potential starting points for linking species and ecosystems are given in the final section. To facilitate interaction between population/community and ecosystem/landscape ecology, units of study should be spatially based.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Jones", 
        "givenName": "Clive G.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Lawton", 
        "givenName": "John H.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-1-4613-5714-8", 
        "978-1-4615-1773-3"
      ], 
      "name": "Linking Species & Ecosystems", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "name": "Why Link Species and Ecosystems? A Perspective from Ecosystem Ecology", 
    "pagination": "5-15", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "ac7a4a079e4b3cadf6b1ac8fcd1cb7ce13dcf49c6eb0604fc753d9f599a59789"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1036207686"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "location": "Boston, MA", 
      "name": "Springer US", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036207686"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-15T17:01", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000001_0000000264/records_8678_00000062.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

66 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      27 URIs      20 LITERALS      8 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0602
3 schema:author N4ce4aef318f7428788e50b5815839ee3
4 schema:datePublished 1995
5 schema:datePublishedReg 1995-01-01
6 schema:description Population, community, and ecosystem ecologists historically have asked different kinds of questions about nature, and as a result have defined domains of study quite differently. In this chapter, the general question “Why link species and ecosystems?” will be explored from an ecosystem ecologist’s point of view. I begin by considering the subdisciplinary distinctions in ecology: how they are reflected in questions asked, what theories underlie them, and what areas are ripe for integration. Species occur in nature as members of interactive assemblages, and their interactions may affect ecosystem functioning in either subtle or dramatic ways. Given the attention that has been paid by community ecologists to biotic interactions, does an understanding of these processes contribute to understanding ecosystem functioning? A complex stream system and conceptual model are described for the purpose of highlighting questions relevant to integrating biotic interactions, disturbance, and ecosystem functioning. Finally, some loose ideas on the themes of disturbance and stability, patchiness, and scale as potential starting points for linking species and ecosystems are given in the final section. To facilitate interaction between population/community and ecosystem/landscape ecology, units of study should be spatially based.
7 schema:editor Na7491084a3bc4ef78f35d3160313171c
8 schema:genre chapter
9 schema:inLanguage en
10 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
11 schema:isPartOf N660e84a51cc0405bb43ab89aa03bdc25
12 schema:name Why Link Species and Ecosystems? A Perspective from Ecosystem Ecology
13 schema:pagination 5-15
14 schema:productId N29fd95c820ca49f8812d4a5927c50273
15 N39f99fa3fe9f49aca986a98ead061377
16 N5d4bbaf1710e4bf0adcff7b04713c7d6
17 schema:publisher N89e5452d9e8448868e63bd9e182bf676
18 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036207686
19 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1
20 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-15T17:01
21 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
22 schema:sdPublisher N64f6f8c5827f4011b4200271d88731db
23 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1
24 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
25 sgo:sdDataset chapters
26 rdf:type schema:Chapter
27 N00497257bcff486181371c4fa9c40835 schema:familyName Lawton
28 schema:givenName John H.
29 rdf:type schema:Person
30 N28371bbcbb684058a7fee4ed17d5164c rdf:first N00497257bcff486181371c4fa9c40835
31 rdf:rest rdf:nil
32 N29fd95c820ca49f8812d4a5927c50273 schema:name doi
33 schema:value 10.1007/978-1-4615-1773-3_1
34 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
35 N39f99fa3fe9f49aca986a98ead061377 schema:name dimensions_id
36 schema:value pub.1036207686
37 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
38 N4ce4aef318f7428788e50b5815839ee3 rdf:first sg:person.01250244252.58
39 rdf:rest rdf:nil
40 N5d4bbaf1710e4bf0adcff7b04713c7d6 schema:name readcube_id
41 schema:value ac7a4a079e4b3cadf6b1ac8fcd1cb7ce13dcf49c6eb0604fc753d9f599a59789
42 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
43 N64f6f8c5827f4011b4200271d88731db schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
44 rdf:type schema:Organization
45 N660e84a51cc0405bb43ab89aa03bdc25 schema:isbn 978-1-4613-5714-8
46 978-1-4615-1773-3
47 schema:name Linking Species & Ecosystems
48 rdf:type schema:Book
49 N89e5452d9e8448868e63bd9e182bf676 schema:location Boston, MA
50 schema:name Springer US
51 rdf:type schema:Organisation
52 Na7491084a3bc4ef78f35d3160313171c rdf:first Nffff5e2c2e0444acadd6d1f60ae52382
53 rdf:rest N28371bbcbb684058a7fee4ed17d5164c
54 Nffff5e2c2e0444acadd6d1f60ae52382 schema:familyName Jones
55 schema:givenName Clive G.
56 rdf:type schema:Person
57 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
58 schema:name Biological Sciences
59 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
60 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
61 schema:name Ecology
62 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
63 sg:person.01250244252.58 schema:familyName Grimm
64 schema:givenName Nancy B.
65 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01250244252.58
66 rdf:type schema:Person
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...