A Multidimensional Approach to Disruptive Behaviors: Informing Life Span Research from an Early Childhood Perspective View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2013-06-13

AUTHORS

Alice S. Carter , Sarah A. O. Gray , Raymond H. Baillargeon , Lauren S. Wakschlag

ABSTRACT

The historical use of categorical diagnoses of disruptive behavior syndromes and disorders has been integral to clinical identification, treatment, and service utilization. The major nosological frameworks for classification have been the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) (American Psychiatric Association, 2000) and International Classification of Diseases (World Health Organization, 2000). Increasingly, however, there is consensus that categorical approaches, which rely on an array of symptom criteria to classify an individual as having or not having a single disorder, may not fully capture clinical and developmental patterns of disruptive behaviors across the life cycle (Baillargeon, Zoccolillo, et al., 2007; Frick & White, 2008; Maughan, 2005; Rutter, 2003; Wakschlag et al., 2011). In contrast, multidimensional conceptualizations of psychopathology, which incorporate more than one domain or dimension of behavior and assess each domain/dimension along a continuum, offer many unique advantages to clinical characterization of disruptive behavior, including (1) improved characterization of heterogeneity, (2) provision of alternative strategies for understanding developmental course, (3) parsing the manner in which different components or dimensions of disruptive behavior may have varying associations with co-occurring symptoms, and (4) linkage of specific dimensions relevant to disruptive behavior to neurobiologic mechanisms as well as family and ecological contextual factors. More... »

PAGES

103-135

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4614-7557-6_5

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7557-6_5

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1006174879


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