Developmental Synthesis of HSPs in the Male Gametophytic Phase of Heat Tolerant and Heat Sensitive Species View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1992

AUTHORS

C. Frova , G. Taramino , M. Sari Gorla , E. Ottaviano

ABSTRACT

The fundamental requisite for a positive outcome of male gametophytic selection (MQS) is that the genes controlling the character to be selected are expressed in both phases of the plant life cycle. If this condition is met, MGS can be particularly efficient because of the large male gametophytic population size, its haploidy and the possibility to handle large experiments in limited space and controlled conditions. Moreover, detailed knowledge of the genetical basis of the character under selection is not an absolute need. This makes MGS an appealing selection strategy for traits with a complex and largely unknown genetical basis. One such case is thermotolerance, a character which is the result of several components acting at different levels of the plant organization. At the cellular level, the involvement of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in thermoprotection is indicated by a large body of correlative evidence. HSPs are transcriptionally induced by a marked temperature upshift in all sporophytic tissues, which concomitantly acquire the ability to withstand a further, otherwise lethal, temperature increase (Sachs and Ho, 1986; Lin et al., 1984; Krishnan et al., 1989). With regard to the male gametophytic phase, there are indications that HSP synthesis may be developmentally regulated: for instance in maize, HSP synthesis has been detected in immature, but not in mature, germinating pollen (Frova et al., 1986). Whether this feature is common among plants is not known: the results reported in the literature (Cooper et al., 1984; Mascarenhas and Altschuler, 1983; van Herpen et al., 1989) indicate a general lack of HSP synthesis in mature pollen, but the data refer mainly to species and genetic material adapted to temperate climates. The situation in species systematically exposed to high temperature stress has not been explored. It might be, as in the case of other environmental stresses (see Ottaviano and Mulcahy, 1989 for review), that recurrent selective pressures in both pre and post shedding phases have led to the evolution of adaptability to temperature stress in the sense of expression of the heat shock genes in those stages. More... »

PAGES

191-195

Book

TITLE

Angiosperm Pollen and Ovules

ISBN

978-1-4612-7733-0
978-1-4612-2958-2

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4612-2958-2_30

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-2958-2_30

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033355571


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