External Debt, Economic Success and Economic Failure: State Autonomy, Africa and the NICs View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1993

AUTHORS

Roger Charlton

ABSTRACT

The term ‘NIC’ is variously translated as referring to Newly Industrialising or Newly Industrialised Countries, but more commonly the former. Under these rubrics, country attributions vary even more widely, ranging from a high of 23, covering various assorted Asian, Latin American, Mediterranean and East European states, to a low of 6. These basic six, or seven, if Argentina is included, are Brazil, Mexico, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan.1 Interest in these states’ collective performance dates from the mid-1970s when a rapid and significant increase in their exports of manufactured products was noted. Since then, whilst the NICs have collectively continued to achieve significant increases in manufacturing output, the trajectories of the two regional groupings have substantially diverged. In particular, the manufactured export performance of the East Asian NICs has consistently outperformed that achieved by the debt-laden Latin American states. Consequently, in recent years academic interest in the trajectories of Brazil, Argentina and Mexico (commonly therefore BAM) qua NICs has increasingly come to be focused on their utility as a cautionary foil or mirror to the continuing success of the East Asian ‘Gang of Four’, ‘Little Tigers’ or ‘Dragons’.2 If there are indeed alternative Latin American and East Asian ‘pathways from the periphery’, the latter currently appears to indicate the possibility of a smoother and speedier journey.3 More... »

PAGES

168-188

Book

TITLE

The Politics of Global Debt

ISBN

978-1-349-22822-5
978-1-349-22820-1

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-349-22820-1_9

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-22820-1_9

DIMENSIONS

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