Aphasia Syndromes View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2010-12-16

AUTHORS

Mike R. Schoenberg , James G. Scott

ABSTRACT

The assessment of language is an essential component to neuropsychological evaluations. One that is often quickly summarized as “speech was fluent and articulate, with normal rate, rhythm, intonation, and prosody.” While this may describe some aspects of speech, it by no means offers clinicians enough information to determine if language functions are impaired. This chapter will approach the assessment of language from more of a diagnostic perspective. That is, we will approach language disorders based on well-described aphasia syndromes which are familiar to many. While this can be helpful, some readers uncertain of aphasia syndromes, but observing some disruption of language, are encouraged to review 10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_7, which explores diagnosis of language disorders from a symptomatic (behavioral observation) perspective. Aphasia syndromes denote an acquired language dysfunction due to neurological injury or disease. Aphasia syndromes are generally described by three language domains first detailed by Bensen and Geschwind: (1) fluent or nonfluent, (2) language comprehension, and (3) repetition. Additional components for assessing aphasia have been added, including naming, reading, and writing. Maintaining consistency with 10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_7, reference to “dominant hemisphere” will refer to left hemisphere, since greater than 90% of people are left hemisphere dominant for language. Approximately 90–95% of the general population is right-handed.Rule of thumb: Left hemisphere dominance for languageRight handed – 90–95%Left handed – 60–70% Rule of thumb: Left hemisphere dominance for language Right handed – 90–95% Left handed – 60–70% The clinical features of each aphasia syndrome are reviewed below along with neuroanatomical correlates. For rapid review, please see Tables 12.1 and 12.2 and Appendix. For more detailed discussion, please see Heilman and Valenstein (Clinical neuropsychology, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004), Kolb and Whishaw (Fundamentals of human neuropsychology, 6th edn, Worth, New York, 2008), Goodglass et al. (The assessment of aphasia and related disorders, 3rd edn, Pro-Ed, Austin, 2001), Lezak et al. (Neuropsychological assessment, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004), Mesulam (Principles of behavioral and cognitive neurology, 2nd edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2000), and/or Victor and Ropper (Adams and Victor’s principals of neurology, 7th edn, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2001) for reviews. More... »

PAGES

267-292

References to SciGraph publications

Book

TITLE

The Little Black Book of Neuropsychology

ISBN

978-0-387-70703-7
978-0-387-76978-3

Author Affiliations

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033622098


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1103", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Clinical Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of South Florida", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.170693.a", 
          "name": [
            "Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Schoenberg", 
        "givenName": "Mike R.", 
        "id": "sg:person.016146472077.28", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016146472077.28"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of South Florida", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.170693.a", 
          "name": [
            "Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Scott", 
        "givenName": "James G.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01234676111.18", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01234676111.18"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/380499a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1005507851", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/380499a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066x.57.12.1060", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031776996"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1017/s135561770393013x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051832657"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/107.2.605", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1059437699"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2010-12-16", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2010-12-16", 
    "description": "The assessment of language is an essential component to neuropsychological evaluations. One that is often quickly summarized as \u201cspeech was fluent and articulate, with normal rate, rhythm, intonation, and prosody.\u201d While this may describe some aspects of speech, it by no means offers clinicians enough information to determine if language functions are impaired. This chapter will approach the assessment of language from more of a diagnostic perspective. That is, we will approach language disorders based on well-described aphasia syndromes which are familiar to many. While this can be helpful, some readers uncertain of aphasia syndromes, but observing some disruption of language, are encouraged to review 10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_7, which explores diagnosis of language disorders from a symptomatic (behavioral observation) perspective. Aphasia syndromes denote an acquired language dysfunction due to neurological injury or disease. Aphasia syndromes are generally described by three language domains first detailed by Bensen and Geschwind: (1) fluent or nonfluent, (2) language comprehension, and (3) repetition. Additional components for assessing aphasia have been added, including naming, reading, and writing. Maintaining consistency with 10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_7, reference to \u201cdominant hemisphere\u201d will refer to left hemisphere, since greater than 90% of people are left hemisphere dominant for language. Approximately 90\u201395% of the general population is right-handed.Rule of thumb: Left hemisphere dominance for languageRight handed \u2013 90\u201395%Left handed \u2013 60\u201370% Rule of thumb: Left hemisphere dominance for language Right handed \u2013 90\u201395% Left handed \u2013 60\u201370% The clinical features of each aphasia syndrome are reviewed below along with neuroanatomical correlates. For rapid review, please see Tables 12.1 and 12.2 and Appendix. For more detailed discussion, please see Heilman and Valenstein (Clinical neuropsychology, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004), Kolb and Whishaw (Fundamentals of human neuropsychology, 6th edn, Worth, New York, 2008), Goodglass et al. (The assessment of aphasia and related disorders, 3rd edn, Pro-Ed, Austin, 2001), Lezak et al. (Neuropsychological assessment, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004), Mesulam (Principles of behavioral and cognitive neurology, 2nd edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2000), and/or Victor and Ropper (Adams and Victor\u2019s principals of neurology, 7th edn, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2001) for reviews.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Schoenberg", 
        "givenName": "Mike R.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Scott", 
        "givenName": "James G.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-0-387-70703-7", 
        "978-0-387-76978-3"
      ], 
      "name": "The Little Black Book of Neuropsychology", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "name": "Aphasia Syndromes", 
    "pagination": "267-292", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1033622098"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "a02a01136fe16b67fddca2f0559aa0e1d1bbcb06767a813e63cee5736509e60d"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "location": "Boston, MA", 
      "name": "Springer US", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033622098"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-16T08:39", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000365_0000000365/records_71707_00000001.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://link.springer.com/10.1007%2F978-0-387-76978-3_12"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

90 TRIPLES      23 PREDICATES      30 URIs      19 LITERALS      8 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1103
3 schema:author Nc3a9f715a0fb47dbaa731a87f1a10a78
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1038/380499a0
5 https://doi.org/10.1017/s135561770393013x
6 https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066x.57.12.1060
7 https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/107.2.605
8 schema:datePublished 2010-12-16
9 schema:datePublishedReg 2010-12-16
10 schema:description The assessment of language is an essential component to neuropsychological evaluations. One that is often quickly summarized as “speech was fluent and articulate, with normal rate, rhythm, intonation, and prosody.” While this may describe some aspects of speech, it by no means offers clinicians enough information to determine if language functions are impaired. This chapter will approach the assessment of language from more of a diagnostic perspective. That is, we will approach language disorders based on well-described aphasia syndromes which are familiar to many. While this can be helpful, some readers uncertain of aphasia syndromes, but observing some disruption of language, are encouraged to review 10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_7, which explores diagnosis of language disorders from a symptomatic (behavioral observation) perspective. Aphasia syndromes denote an acquired language dysfunction due to neurological injury or disease. Aphasia syndromes are generally described by three language domains first detailed by Bensen and Geschwind: (1) fluent or nonfluent, (2) language comprehension, and (3) repetition. Additional components for assessing aphasia have been added, including naming, reading, and writing. Maintaining consistency with 10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_7, reference to “dominant hemisphere” will refer to left hemisphere, since greater than 90% of people are left hemisphere dominant for language. Approximately 90–95% of the general population is right-handed.Rule of thumb: Left hemisphere dominance for languageRight handed – 90–95%Left handed – 60–70% Rule of thumb: Left hemisphere dominance for language Right handed – 90–95% Left handed – 60–70% The clinical features of each aphasia syndrome are reviewed below along with neuroanatomical correlates. For rapid review, please see Tables 12.1 and 12.2 and Appendix. For more detailed discussion, please see Heilman and Valenstein (Clinical neuropsychology, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004), Kolb and Whishaw (Fundamentals of human neuropsychology, 6th edn, Worth, New York, 2008), Goodglass et al. (The assessment of aphasia and related disorders, 3rd edn, Pro-Ed, Austin, 2001), Lezak et al. (Neuropsychological assessment, 4th edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004), Mesulam (Principles of behavioral and cognitive neurology, 2nd edn, Oxford University Press, New York, 2000), and/or Victor and Ropper (Adams and Victor’s principals of neurology, 7th edn, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2001) for reviews.
11 schema:editor Ne7055a9dee8b460db30fff22ed2b8ea5
12 schema:genre chapter
13 schema:inLanguage en
14 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
15 schema:isPartOf N54bebd5dd37d45f39413a054222bb255
16 schema:name Aphasia Syndromes
17 schema:pagination 267-292
18 schema:productId N2d5e83333262460fb8e7825d045e41e3
19 Nb28f868903a740ff9f11536bc93a1d39
20 Ncfd7f69acd9d4f1d8c7eb3331402ce88
21 schema:publisher Nab30803d453e4a36b5737dd1380c4c68
22 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033622098
23 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12
24 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-16T08:39
25 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
26 schema:sdPublisher Nef3238ba71344b65b0426665deccbd25
27 schema:url https://link.springer.com/10.1007%2F978-0-387-76978-3_12
28 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
29 sgo:sdDataset chapters
30 rdf:type schema:Chapter
31 N2d5e83333262460fb8e7825d045e41e3 schema:name readcube_id
32 schema:value a02a01136fe16b67fddca2f0559aa0e1d1bbcb06767a813e63cee5736509e60d
33 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
34 N30159a00f140496f90e6199f197a0df1 schema:familyName Scott
35 schema:givenName James G.
36 rdf:type schema:Person
37 N38c63d3c1bdc4a4295f49ebfead7036d rdf:first sg:person.01234676111.18
38 rdf:rest rdf:nil
39 N47b81a12d756466886add727b5fb563c schema:familyName Schoenberg
40 schema:givenName Mike R.
41 rdf:type schema:Person
42 N51ffcd8c9fb7405181f58e761c74fc25 rdf:first N30159a00f140496f90e6199f197a0df1
43 rdf:rest rdf:nil
44 N54bebd5dd37d45f39413a054222bb255 schema:isbn 978-0-387-70703-7
45 978-0-387-76978-3
46 schema:name The Little Black Book of Neuropsychology
47 rdf:type schema:Book
48 Nab30803d453e4a36b5737dd1380c4c68 schema:location Boston, MA
49 schema:name Springer US
50 rdf:type schema:Organisation
51 Nb28f868903a740ff9f11536bc93a1d39 schema:name dimensions_id
52 schema:value pub.1033622098
53 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
54 Nc3a9f715a0fb47dbaa731a87f1a10a78 rdf:first sg:person.016146472077.28
55 rdf:rest N38c63d3c1bdc4a4295f49ebfead7036d
56 Ncfd7f69acd9d4f1d8c7eb3331402ce88 schema:name doi
57 schema:value 10.1007/978-0-387-76978-3_12
58 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
59 Ne7055a9dee8b460db30fff22ed2b8ea5 rdf:first N47b81a12d756466886add727b5fb563c
60 rdf:rest N51ffcd8c9fb7405181f58e761c74fc25
61 Nef3238ba71344b65b0426665deccbd25 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
62 rdf:type schema:Organization
63 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
64 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
65 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
66 anzsrc-for:1103 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
67 schema:name Clinical Sciences
68 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
69 sg:person.01234676111.18 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.170693.a
70 schema:familyName Scott
71 schema:givenName James G.
72 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01234676111.18
73 rdf:type schema:Person
74 sg:person.016146472077.28 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.170693.a
75 schema:familyName Schoenberg
76 schema:givenName Mike R.
77 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016146472077.28
78 rdf:type schema:Person
79 sg:pub.10.1038/380499a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1005507851
80 https://doi.org/10.1038/380499a0
81 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
82 https://doi.org/10.1017/s135561770393013x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051832657
83 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
84 https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066x.57.12.1060 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031776996
85 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
86 https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/107.2.605 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1059437699
87 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
88 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.170693.a schema:alternateName University of South Florida
89 schema:name Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA
90 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...