Keynote Communicating Cars: A Case for Ubiquitous Computing in the Automotive Domain View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2002-03-28

AUTHORS

Ralf Guido Herrtwich

ABSTRACT

Examples for ubiquitous computing applications usually come from the household domain. Typical lists include microwave ovens with integrated web-pads, refrigerators or washing machines with remote Internet connections for maintenance access, and even instrumented coffee mugs or clothes. While many of these examples have substantial entertainment value, the likelihood of their realization and pervasive deployment in the not too distant future is questionable. There is, however, another application domain for ubiquitous computing which holds substantial promise, but is often overlooked: the automotive sector.Cars are fairly attractive protagonists for ubiquitous computing: They are large enough to have communication devices integrated in them, in fact, a substantial portion of them has integrated phones today. They come with their own power source which can also feed their communications equipment. Their price is some orders of magnitude higher than that of the device to be included, so the relative price increase to make them communicate is small. And, perhaps most importantly, some services such as mayday, remote tracking, or tele-diagnosis make vehicle connectivity desirable for car buyers and car manufacturers alike.In this talk, we discuss how ubiquitous computing in the automotive domain can become a reality. We investigate the principal services resulting from network-connected cars, focussing on vehicle-originated rather than passenger-related communication as we believe that ubiquitous computing is more about communicating machines than communicating humans. Within the vehicle-centric services identified, we distinguish between client/server and peer-to-peer applications, resulting in different communication requirements and system setups. We outline some network solutions to meet these requirements, including technologies for car-to-infrastructure and car-to-car communication in different regions of the world. We conclude by discussing the overall effect which these developments may have on the automotive industry. More... »

PAGES

3-3

Book

TITLE

Trends in Network and Pervasive Computing — ARCS 2002

ISBN

978-3-540-43409-2
978-3-540-45997-2

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1052182505


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/08", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Information and Computing Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/10", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Technology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0806", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Information Systems", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1005", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Communications Technologies", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "DaimlerChrysler AG, Alt-Moabit 96a, 10559, Berlin, Germany", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5433.1", 
          "name": [
            "DaimlerChrysler AG, Alt-Moabit 96a, 10559, Berlin, Germany"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Herrtwich", 
        "givenName": "Ralf Guido", 
        "id": "sg:person.016051451607.98", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016051451607.98"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2002-03-28", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2002-03-28", 
    "description": "Examples for ubiquitous computing applications usually come from the household domain. Typical lists include microwave ovens with integrated web-pads, refrigerators or washing machines with remote Internet connections for maintenance access, and even instrumented coffee mugs or clothes. While many of these examples have substantial entertainment value, the likelihood of their realization and pervasive deployment in the not too distant future is questionable. There is, however, another application domain for ubiquitous computing which holds substantial promise, but is often overlooked: the automotive sector.Cars are fairly attractive protagonists for ubiquitous computing: They are large enough to have communication devices integrated in them, in fact, a substantial portion of them has integrated phones today. They come with their own power source which can also feed their communications equipment. Their price is some orders of magnitude higher than that of the device to be included, so the relative price increase to make them communicate is small. And, perhaps most importantly, some services such as mayday, remote tracking, or tele-diagnosis make vehicle connectivity desirable for car buyers and car manufacturers alike.In this talk, we discuss how ubiquitous computing in the automotive domain can become a reality. We investigate the principal services resulting from network-connected cars, focussing on vehicle-originated rather than passenger-related communication as we believe that ubiquitous computing is more about communicating machines than communicating humans. Within the vehicle-centric services identified, we distinguish between client/server and peer-to-peer applications, resulting in different communication requirements and system setups. We outline some network solutions to meet these requirements, including technologies for car-to-infrastructure and car-to-car communication in different regions of the world. We conclude by discussing the overall effect which these developments may have on the automotive industry.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Schmeck", 
        "givenName": "Hartmut", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Ungerer", 
        "givenName": "Theo", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Wolf", 
        "givenName": "Lars", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-3-540-43409-2", 
        "978-3-540-45997-2"
      ], 
      "name": "Trends in Network and Pervasive Computing \u2014 ARCS 2002", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "keywords": [
      "ubiquitous computing", 
      "automotive domain", 
      "ubiquitous computing applications", 
      "client/server", 
      "different communication requirements", 
      "computing applications", 
      "application domains", 
      "peer applications", 
      "pervasive deployment", 
      "communication requirements", 
      "Internet connection", 
      "computing", 
      "vehicle connectivity", 
      "network solution", 
      "car communication", 
      "remote tracking", 
      "communication devices", 
      "typical list", 
      "own power source", 
      "system setup", 
      "principal services", 
      "communication equipment", 
      "household domains", 
      "entertainment value", 
      "machine", 
      "services", 
      "communication", 
      "coffee mug", 
      "car manufacturers", 
      "server", 
      "car", 
      "requirements", 
      "automotive industry", 
      "domain", 
      "infrastructure", 
      "Mayday", 
      "tracking", 
      "applications", 
      "deployment", 
      "automotive sector", 
      "washing machine", 
      "devices", 
      "maintenance access", 
      "technology", 
      "connectivity", 
      "example", 
      "peers", 
      "access", 
      "reality", 
      "realization", 
      "setup", 
      "today", 
      "orders of magnitude", 
      "solution", 
      "list", 
      "equipment", 
      "buyers", 
      "distant future", 
      "order", 
      "industry", 
      "substantial promise", 
      "power source", 
      "connection", 
      "world", 
      "manufacturers", 
      "clothes", 
      "car buyers", 
      "future", 
      "fact", 
      "different regions", 
      "development", 
      "promise", 
      "source", 
      "humans", 
      "talk", 
      "sector", 
      "prices", 
      "likelihood", 
      "cases", 
      "substantial portion", 
      "portion", 
      "values", 
      "region", 
      "magnitude", 
      "refrigerator", 
      "increase", 
      "overall effect", 
      "oven", 
      "effect", 
      "price increases", 
      "protagonists", 
      "mug", 
      "relative price increases", 
      "remote Internet connections", 
      "substantial entertainment value", 
      "attractive protagonists", 
      "phones today", 
      "network-connected cars", 
      "passenger-related communication", 
      "vehicle-centric services"
    ], 
    "name": "Keynote Communicating Cars: A Case for Ubiquitous Computing in the Automotive Domain", 
    "pagination": "3-3", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1052182505"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1052182505"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-01-01T19:25", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220101/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_428.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

178 TRIPLES      23 PREDICATES      127 URIs      118 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1 schema:about anzsrc-for:08
2 anzsrc-for:0806
3 anzsrc-for:10
4 anzsrc-for:1005
5 schema:author Ne1b77c9dd897404e91bb151155c2e5f7
6 schema:datePublished 2002-03-28
7 schema:datePublishedReg 2002-03-28
8 schema:description Examples for ubiquitous computing applications usually come from the household domain. Typical lists include microwave ovens with integrated web-pads, refrigerators or washing machines with remote Internet connections for maintenance access, and even instrumented coffee mugs or clothes. While many of these examples have substantial entertainment value, the likelihood of their realization and pervasive deployment in the not too distant future is questionable. There is, however, another application domain for ubiquitous computing which holds substantial promise, but is often overlooked: the automotive sector.Cars are fairly attractive protagonists for ubiquitous computing: They are large enough to have communication devices integrated in them, in fact, a substantial portion of them has integrated phones today. They come with their own power source which can also feed their communications equipment. Their price is some orders of magnitude higher than that of the device to be included, so the relative price increase to make them communicate is small. And, perhaps most importantly, some services such as mayday, remote tracking, or tele-diagnosis make vehicle connectivity desirable for car buyers and car manufacturers alike.In this talk, we discuss how ubiquitous computing in the automotive domain can become a reality. We investigate the principal services resulting from network-connected cars, focussing on vehicle-originated rather than passenger-related communication as we believe that ubiquitous computing is more about communicating machines than communicating humans. Within the vehicle-centric services identified, we distinguish between client/server and peer-to-peer applications, resulting in different communication requirements and system setups. We outline some network solutions to meet these requirements, including technologies for car-to-infrastructure and car-to-car communication in different regions of the world. We conclude by discussing the overall effect which these developments may have on the automotive industry.
9 schema:editor N7f524030f9d64d30bd230cedeecb5514
10 schema:genre chapter
11 schema:inLanguage en
12 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
13 schema:isPartOf Ne24d09b1ed5d4e2cb69d85f949183778
14 schema:keywords Internet connection
15 Mayday
16 access
17 application domains
18 applications
19 attractive protagonists
20 automotive domain
21 automotive industry
22 automotive sector
23 buyers
24 car
25 car buyers
26 car communication
27 car manufacturers
28 cases
29 client/server
30 clothes
31 coffee mug
32 communication
33 communication devices
34 communication equipment
35 communication requirements
36 computing
37 computing applications
38 connection
39 connectivity
40 deployment
41 development
42 devices
43 different communication requirements
44 different regions
45 distant future
46 domain
47 effect
48 entertainment value
49 equipment
50 example
51 fact
52 future
53 household domains
54 humans
55 increase
56 industry
57 infrastructure
58 likelihood
59 list
60 machine
61 magnitude
62 maintenance access
63 manufacturers
64 mug
65 network solution
66 network-connected cars
67 order
68 orders of magnitude
69 oven
70 overall effect
71 own power source
72 passenger-related communication
73 peer applications
74 peers
75 pervasive deployment
76 phones today
77 portion
78 power source
79 price increases
80 prices
81 principal services
82 promise
83 protagonists
84 reality
85 realization
86 refrigerator
87 region
88 relative price increases
89 remote Internet connections
90 remote tracking
91 requirements
92 sector
93 server
94 services
95 setup
96 solution
97 source
98 substantial entertainment value
99 substantial portion
100 substantial promise
101 system setup
102 talk
103 technology
104 today
105 tracking
106 typical list
107 ubiquitous computing
108 ubiquitous computing applications
109 values
110 vehicle connectivity
111 vehicle-centric services
112 washing machine
113 world
114 schema:name Keynote Communicating Cars: A Case for Ubiquitous Computing in the Automotive Domain
115 schema:pagination 3-3
116 schema:productId N2f67beb7ae9948ce8cb2900e2eacbfa8
117 Nf786dd105ae94e7da734ce6cafee9ab8
118 schema:publisher Na18a7d7c536c4b4aa971175464c2f3f5
119 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1052182505
120 https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1
121 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-01-01T19:25
122 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
123 schema:sdPublisher N97003cce0ab74539acf78f3c18bb3486
124 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1
125 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
126 sgo:sdDataset chapters
127 rdf:type schema:Chapter
128 N2f67beb7ae9948ce8cb2900e2eacbfa8 schema:name dimensions_id
129 schema:value pub.1052182505
130 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
131 N36e38b11196349099b1f944e4d5d67fe schema:familyName Ungerer
132 schema:givenName Theo
133 rdf:type schema:Person
134 N5a9721cddaa9448dbafb9c8333b2ea8d rdf:first N36e38b11196349099b1f944e4d5d67fe
135 rdf:rest N64d747cb47c443d6996e4e3b492faa13
136 N5f90628d4683483b904ce656eddeaf81 schema:familyName Wolf
137 schema:givenName Lars
138 rdf:type schema:Person
139 N64d747cb47c443d6996e4e3b492faa13 rdf:first N5f90628d4683483b904ce656eddeaf81
140 rdf:rest rdf:nil
141 N738282db6e6541d2bf6c9be99ac98ff3 schema:familyName Schmeck
142 schema:givenName Hartmut
143 rdf:type schema:Person
144 N7f524030f9d64d30bd230cedeecb5514 rdf:first N738282db6e6541d2bf6c9be99ac98ff3
145 rdf:rest N5a9721cddaa9448dbafb9c8333b2ea8d
146 N97003cce0ab74539acf78f3c18bb3486 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
147 rdf:type schema:Organization
148 Na18a7d7c536c4b4aa971175464c2f3f5 schema:name Springer Nature
149 rdf:type schema:Organisation
150 Ne1b77c9dd897404e91bb151155c2e5f7 rdf:first sg:person.016051451607.98
151 rdf:rest rdf:nil
152 Ne24d09b1ed5d4e2cb69d85f949183778 schema:isbn 978-3-540-43409-2
153 978-3-540-45997-2
154 schema:name Trends in Network and Pervasive Computing — ARCS 2002
155 rdf:type schema:Book
156 Nf786dd105ae94e7da734ce6cafee9ab8 schema:name doi
157 schema:value 10.1007/3-540-45997-9_1
158 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
159 anzsrc-for:08 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
160 schema:name Information and Computing Sciences
161 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
162 anzsrc-for:0806 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
163 schema:name Information Systems
164 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
165 anzsrc-for:10 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
166 schema:name Technology
167 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
168 anzsrc-for:1005 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
169 schema:name Communications Technologies
170 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
171 sg:person.016051451607.98 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.5433.1
172 schema:familyName Herrtwich
173 schema:givenName Ralf Guido
174 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016051451607.98
175 rdf:type schema:Person
176 grid-institutes:grid.5433.1 schema:alternateName DaimlerChrysler AG, Alt-Moabit 96a, 10559, Berlin, Germany
177 schema:name DaimlerChrysler AG, Alt-Moabit 96a, 10559, Berlin, Germany
178 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...