Medicolegal Aspects and Informed Consent View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2016-03-29

AUTHORS

Leonard Berlin

ABSTRACT

With the advent of high resolution CT, MRI, and ultrasound scanning, the frequency of radiologists’ serendipitous discovery of incidental findings (colloquially referred to as “incidentalomas”) on radiological examinations is increasing. Incidentalomas account for approximately 20% of all findings, due to two reasons: (a) the number of hi-tech imaging exams (primarily CT) performed today, and (b) the increasing sophistication of the technology. In the early 1980s when CT scanning was in its infancy, 3 to 5 million scans were performed annually in the US. In the past few years, the annual number of CT scans performed in the US has increased exponentially to well over 80 million. In addition, the specificity of the equipment has advanced geometrically such that abnormalities and/or pseudo-abnormalities 1 mm or a fraction of 1 mm in size that were virtually “invisible” before can now be seen quite easily.Statistically only 1% or less of these incidentalomas represent an early malignancy or other severe pathology. Thus, radiologists are faced with a dilemma: if they report every incidentaloma, many patients will be subjected to a cascade of costly testing, sometimes leading to biopsies or other invasive procedures, all of which on occasion may lead to complications and cause harm to the patient who was completely healthy and was never ill to begin with. On the other hand, should the radiologist decide not to report the presence of an incidentaloma, and it is later discovered that it was indeed an early malignancy and thus a fatal delay in diagnosis and treatment ensued, the patient could be permanently harmed or even die, and a medical malpractice lawsuit would almost certainly follow.What, if anything, should the radiologist report to the patient or the referring physician, when faced with an incidentaloma? Should, or must, informed consent be required? This Chapter will focus on both the moral-ethical, and the medico-legal, aspects of the incidentaloma dilemma faced everyday by radiologists as well as treating physicians. More... »

PAGES

25-34

Book

TITLE

Incidental Radiological Findings

ISBN

978-3-319-42579-5
978-3-319-42581-8

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_35

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_35

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007248942


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1103", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Clinical Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.185648.6", 
          "name": [
            "Radiology Department, Skokie Hospital, 9600 Gross Point Road, 60076, Skokie, IL, USA", 
            "Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA", 
            "University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Berlin", 
        "givenName": "Leonard", 
        "id": "sg:person.01146703320.54", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01146703320.54"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2016-03-29", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2016-03-29", 
    "description": "With the advent of high resolution CT, MRI, and ultrasound scanning, the frequency of radiologists\u2019 serendipitous discovery of incidental findings (colloquially referred to as \u201cincidentalomas\u201d) on radiological examinations is increasing. Incidentalomas account for approximately 20% of all findings, due to two reasons: (a) the number of hi-tech imaging exams (primarily CT) performed today, and (b) the increasing sophistication of the technology. In the early 1980s when CT scanning was in its infancy, 3 to 5 million scans were performed annually in the US. In the past few years, the annual number of CT scans performed in the US has increased exponentially to well over 80 million. In addition, the specificity of the equipment has advanced geometrically such that abnormalities and/or pseudo-abnormalities 1 mm or a fraction of 1 mm in size that were virtually \u201cinvisible\u201d before can now be seen quite easily.Statistically only 1% or less of these incidentalomas represent an early malignancy or other severe pathology. Thus, radiologists are faced with a dilemma: if they report every incidentaloma, many patients will be subjected to a cascade of costly testing, sometimes leading to biopsies or other invasive procedures, all of which on occasion may lead to complications and cause harm to the patient who was completely healthy and was never ill to begin with. On the other hand, should the radiologist decide not to report the presence of an incidentaloma, and it is later discovered that it was indeed an early malignancy and thus a fatal delay in diagnosis and treatment ensued, the patient could be permanently harmed or even die, and a medical malpractice lawsuit would almost certainly follow.What, if anything, should the radiologist report to the patient or the referring physician, when faced with an incidentaloma? Should, or must, informed consent be required? This Chapter will focus on both the moral-ethical, and the medico-legal, aspects of the incidentaloma dilemma faced everyday by radiologists as well as treating physicians.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Weckbach", 
        "givenName": "Sabine", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/174_2016_35", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-3-319-42579-5", 
        "978-3-319-42581-8"
      ], 
      "name": "Incidental Radiological Findings", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "keywords": [
      "early malignancy", 
      "informed consent", 
      "high resolution CT", 
      "incidental finding", 
      "radiological examination", 
      "CT scan", 
      "incidentalomas", 
      "invasive procedures", 
      "CT scanning", 
      "radiologist's report", 
      "resolution CT", 
      "patients", 
      "imaging exams", 
      "fatal delay", 
      "severe pathology", 
      "medicolegal aspects", 
      "medical malpractice lawsuits", 
      "annual number", 
      "malignancy", 
      "radiologists", 
      "malpractice lawsuits", 
      "physicians", 
      "scans", 
      "consent", 
      "costly testing", 
      "complications", 
      "biopsy", 
      "findings", 
      "abnormalities", 
      "diagnosis", 
      "pathology", 
      "CT", 
      "MRI", 
      "serendipitous discovery", 
      "treatment", 
      "infancy", 
      "examination", 
      "scanning", 
      "exam", 
      "report", 
      "years", 
      "harm", 
      "specificity", 
      "occasions", 
      "testing", 
      "number", 
      "cascade", 
      "dilemma", 
      "procedure", 
      "presence", 
      "aspects", 
      "frequency", 
      "early 1980s", 
      "uses", 
      "advent", 
      "addition", 
      "delay", 
      "reasons", 
      "hand", 
      "fraction", 
      "discovery", 
      "size", 
      "lawsuits", 
      "chapter", 
      "equipment", 
      "today", 
      "sophistication", 
      "technology", 
      "radiologists\u2019 serendipitous discovery", 
      "hi-tech imaging exams", 
      "incidentaloma dilemma"
    ], 
    "name": "Medicolegal Aspects and Informed Consent", 
    "pagination": "25-34", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1007248942"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/174_2016_35"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_35", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007248942"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-01-01T19:13", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220101/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_236.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_35"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_35'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_35'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_35'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_35'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

133 TRIPLES      23 PREDICATES      95 URIs      88 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/174_2016_35 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1103
3 schema:author Nfbae15f92f5b42bf8133fa60ae3df82d
4 schema:datePublished 2016-03-29
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2016-03-29
6 schema:description With the advent of high resolution CT, MRI, and ultrasound scanning, the frequency of radiologists’ serendipitous discovery of incidental findings (colloquially referred to as “incidentalomas”) on radiological examinations is increasing. Incidentalomas account for approximately 20% of all findings, due to two reasons: (a) the number of hi-tech imaging exams (primarily CT) performed today, and (b) the increasing sophistication of the technology. In the early 1980s when CT scanning was in its infancy, 3 to 5 million scans were performed annually in the US. In the past few years, the annual number of CT scans performed in the US has increased exponentially to well over 80 million. In addition, the specificity of the equipment has advanced geometrically such that abnormalities and/or pseudo-abnormalities 1 mm or a fraction of 1 mm in size that were virtually “invisible” before can now be seen quite easily.Statistically only 1% or less of these incidentalomas represent an early malignancy or other severe pathology. Thus, radiologists are faced with a dilemma: if they report every incidentaloma, many patients will be subjected to a cascade of costly testing, sometimes leading to biopsies or other invasive procedures, all of which on occasion may lead to complications and cause harm to the patient who was completely healthy and was never ill to begin with. On the other hand, should the radiologist decide not to report the presence of an incidentaloma, and it is later discovered that it was indeed an early malignancy and thus a fatal delay in diagnosis and treatment ensued, the patient could be permanently harmed or even die, and a medical malpractice lawsuit would almost certainly follow.What, if anything, should the radiologist report to the patient or the referring physician, when faced with an incidentaloma? Should, or must, informed consent be required? This Chapter will focus on both the moral-ethical, and the medico-legal, aspects of the incidentaloma dilemma faced everyday by radiologists as well as treating physicians.
7 schema:editor N82201b1a72834b2396a414033d977b4b
8 schema:genre chapter
9 schema:inLanguage en
10 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
11 schema:isPartOf N856cf4b946b74f2eafd2663833f9fedf
12 schema:keywords CT
13 CT scan
14 CT scanning
15 MRI
16 abnormalities
17 addition
18 advent
19 annual number
20 aspects
21 biopsy
22 cascade
23 chapter
24 complications
25 consent
26 costly testing
27 delay
28 diagnosis
29 dilemma
30 discovery
31 early 1980s
32 early malignancy
33 equipment
34 exam
35 examination
36 fatal delay
37 findings
38 fraction
39 frequency
40 hand
41 harm
42 hi-tech imaging exams
43 high resolution CT
44 imaging exams
45 incidental finding
46 incidentaloma dilemma
47 incidentalomas
48 infancy
49 informed consent
50 invasive procedures
51 lawsuits
52 malignancy
53 malpractice lawsuits
54 medical malpractice lawsuits
55 medicolegal aspects
56 number
57 occasions
58 pathology
59 patients
60 physicians
61 presence
62 procedure
63 radiological examination
64 radiologist's report
65 radiologists
66 radiologists’ serendipitous discovery
67 reasons
68 report
69 resolution CT
70 scanning
71 scans
72 serendipitous discovery
73 severe pathology
74 size
75 sophistication
76 specificity
77 technology
78 testing
79 today
80 treatment
81 uses
82 years
83 schema:name Medicolegal Aspects and Informed Consent
84 schema:pagination 25-34
85 schema:productId Nae580aaf8c1846a2bcbcebab385b9a39
86 Ncd60975abe044e1ca8604948228836fc
87 schema:publisher Nc506b503de114904afb53c891370e403
88 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007248942
89 https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_35
90 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-01-01T19:13
91 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
92 schema:sdPublisher Nd8ee2acd15fb44dd968cac52c080221c
93 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_35
94 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
95 sgo:sdDataset chapters
96 rdf:type schema:Chapter
97 N82201b1a72834b2396a414033d977b4b rdf:first Nf3ea074a452c412bad9e0c03d9eb97d1
98 rdf:rest rdf:nil
99 N856cf4b946b74f2eafd2663833f9fedf schema:isbn 978-3-319-42579-5
100 978-3-319-42581-8
101 schema:name Incidental Radiological Findings
102 rdf:type schema:Book
103 Nae580aaf8c1846a2bcbcebab385b9a39 schema:name dimensions_id
104 schema:value pub.1007248942
105 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
106 Nc506b503de114904afb53c891370e403 schema:name Springer Nature
107 rdf:type schema:Organisation
108 Ncd60975abe044e1ca8604948228836fc schema:name doi
109 schema:value 10.1007/174_2016_35
110 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
111 Nd8ee2acd15fb44dd968cac52c080221c schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
112 rdf:type schema:Organization
113 Nf3ea074a452c412bad9e0c03d9eb97d1 schema:familyName Weckbach
114 schema:givenName Sabine
115 rdf:type schema:Person
116 Nfbae15f92f5b42bf8133fa60ae3df82d rdf:first sg:person.01146703320.54
117 rdf:rest rdf:nil
118 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
119 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
120 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
121 anzsrc-for:1103 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
122 schema:name Clinical Sciences
123 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
124 sg:person.01146703320.54 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.185648.6
125 schema:familyName Berlin
126 schema:givenName Leonard
127 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01146703320.54
128 rdf:type schema:Person
129 grid-institutes:grid.185648.6 schema:alternateName University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA
130 schema:name Radiology Department, Skokie Hospital, 9600 Gross Point Road, 60076, Skokie, IL, USA
131 Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA
132 University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA
133 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...