Eye Tumors View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2016-04-13

AUTHORS

Helen A. Shih , Alexei V. Trofimov , John E. Munzenrider

ABSTRACT

Reirradiating the eye after ocular irradiation is a relatively rare occurrence since the eye is irradiated infrequently as a primary target. Because of the intrinsic sensitivity of the structures in the eye to radiation, significant efforts are made to minimize the dose received incidentally by the eye during treatment of tumors of the orbit or periorbital areas or of other head and neck or central nervous system sites. Capitalizing upon technological advances that enable increased radiation dose conformality to the primary disease with minimization of excess radiation dose to the nontargeted parts of the eye permits for safer radiation treatment, both at primary indication and at reirradiation. This chapter will discuss the need for radiation oncologists to be aware of the differing threshold doses for complications involving various parts of the eye, specifically the lens, optic nerve, macula, and retina, as well as the tolerance of the lacrimal gland and the tear-producing cells in the eyelids. Recommendations are provided for determining the advisability of attempting reirradiation of the eye after primary treatment with low, intermediate, or high doses. Advantages of focused radiation therapy techniques, specifically external beam proton therapy and episcleral radionuclide plaque brachytherapy for primary treatment or for reirradiation of discrete ocular tumors, are discussed. Finally, the existing literature on proton therapy used in reirradiation of ocular melanomas is described. More... »

PAGES

143-149

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_33

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_33

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028660358


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1113", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ophthalmology and Optometry", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Central Nervous System and Eye Services, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35", 
          "name": [
            "Central Nervous System and Eye Services, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Shih", 
        "givenName": "Helen A.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01361116472.46", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01361116472.46"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35", 
          "name": [
            "Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Trofimov", 
        "givenName": "Alexei V.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0752647141.13", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0752647141.13"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Munzenrider", 
        "givenName": "John E.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0637022555.52", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0637022555.52"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2016-04-13", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2016-04-13", 
    "description": "Reirradiating the eye after ocular irradiation is a relatively rare occurrence since the eye is irradiated infrequently as a primary target. Because of the intrinsic sensitivity of the structures in the eye to radiation, significant efforts are made to minimize the dose received incidentally by the eye during treatment of tumors of the orbit or periorbital areas or of other head and neck or central nervous system sites. Capitalizing upon technological advances that enable increased radiation dose conformality to the primary disease with minimization of excess radiation dose to the nontargeted parts of the eye permits for safer radiation treatment, both at primary indication and at reirradiation. This chapter will discuss the need for radiation oncologists to be aware of the differing threshold doses for complications involving various parts of the eye, specifically the lens, optic nerve, macula, and retina, as well as the tolerance of the lacrimal gland and the tear-producing cells in the eyelids. Recommendations are provided for determining the advisability of attempting reirradiation of the eye after primary treatment with low, intermediate, or high doses. Advantages of focused radiation therapy techniques, specifically external beam proton therapy and episcleral radionuclide plaque brachytherapy for primary treatment or for reirradiation of discrete ocular tumors, are discussed. Finally, the existing literature on proton therapy used in reirradiation of ocular melanomas is described.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Nieder", 
        "givenName": "Carsten", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Langendijk", 
        "givenName": "Johannes", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/174_2016_33", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-3-319-41823-0", 
        "978-3-319-41825-4"
      ], 
      "name": "Re-Irradiation: New Frontiers", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "keywords": [
      "primary treatment", 
      "external beam proton therapy", 
      "central nervous system sites", 
      "nervous system sites", 
      "excess radiation dose", 
      "radiation therapy techniques", 
      "proton therapy", 
      "treatment of tumors", 
      "primary disease", 
      "optic nerve", 
      "plaque brachytherapy", 
      "primary indication", 
      "ocular irradiation", 
      "ocular melanoma", 
      "lacrimal gland", 
      "ocular tumors", 
      "threshold doses", 
      "reirradiation", 
      "high doses", 
      "radiation oncologists", 
      "eye tumors", 
      "periorbital area", 
      "radiation treatment", 
      "rare occurrence", 
      "tumors", 
      "dose conformality", 
      "radiation dose", 
      "therapy techniques", 
      "eyes", 
      "treatment", 
      "therapy", 
      "system sites", 
      "primary target", 
      "dose", 
      "doses", 
      "complications", 
      "nerve", 
      "macula", 
      "oncologists", 
      "melanoma", 
      "disease", 
      "retina", 
      "brachytherapy", 
      "neck", 
      "eyelid", 
      "gland", 
      "indications", 
      "intrinsic sensitivity", 
      "cells", 
      "head", 
      "technological advances", 
      "target", 
      "recommendations", 
      "occurrence", 
      "sensitivity", 
      "advisability", 
      "tolerance", 
      "need", 
      "advances", 
      "part", 
      "literature", 
      "sites", 
      "irradiation", 
      "significant efforts", 
      "conformality", 
      "area", 
      "lens", 
      "efforts", 
      "radiation", 
      "technique", 
      "chapter", 
      "advantages", 
      "orbit", 
      "structure", 
      "minimization"
    ], 
    "name": "Eye Tumors", 
    "pagination": "143-149", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1028660358"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/174_2016_33"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_33", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028660358"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-11-24T21:13", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221124/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_21.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_33"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_33'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_33'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_33'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/174_2016_33'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

157 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      98 URIs      91 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/174_2016_33 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1113
3 schema:author N3da88a4d47d64897af85f4aecd36cf34
4 schema:datePublished 2016-04-13
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2016-04-13
6 schema:description Reirradiating the eye after ocular irradiation is a relatively rare occurrence since the eye is irradiated infrequently as a primary target. Because of the intrinsic sensitivity of the structures in the eye to radiation, significant efforts are made to minimize the dose received incidentally by the eye during treatment of tumors of the orbit or periorbital areas or of other head and neck or central nervous system sites. Capitalizing upon technological advances that enable increased radiation dose conformality to the primary disease with minimization of excess radiation dose to the nontargeted parts of the eye permits for safer radiation treatment, both at primary indication and at reirradiation. This chapter will discuss the need for radiation oncologists to be aware of the differing threshold doses for complications involving various parts of the eye, specifically the lens, optic nerve, macula, and retina, as well as the tolerance of the lacrimal gland and the tear-producing cells in the eyelids. Recommendations are provided for determining the advisability of attempting reirradiation of the eye after primary treatment with low, intermediate, or high doses. Advantages of focused radiation therapy techniques, specifically external beam proton therapy and episcleral radionuclide plaque brachytherapy for primary treatment or for reirradiation of discrete ocular tumors, are discussed. Finally, the existing literature on proton therapy used in reirradiation of ocular melanomas is described.
7 schema:editor Ne9bc5e1ad90d4bec95a2dbf092a2ce24
8 schema:genre chapter
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
10 schema:isPartOf Nea28482c9f004d788eacf37af6a77ae3
11 schema:keywords advances
12 advantages
13 advisability
14 area
15 brachytherapy
16 cells
17 central nervous system sites
18 chapter
19 complications
20 conformality
21 disease
22 dose
23 dose conformality
24 doses
25 efforts
26 excess radiation dose
27 external beam proton therapy
28 eye tumors
29 eyelid
30 eyes
31 gland
32 head
33 high doses
34 indications
35 intrinsic sensitivity
36 irradiation
37 lacrimal gland
38 lens
39 literature
40 macula
41 melanoma
42 minimization
43 neck
44 need
45 nerve
46 nervous system sites
47 occurrence
48 ocular irradiation
49 ocular melanoma
50 ocular tumors
51 oncologists
52 optic nerve
53 orbit
54 part
55 periorbital area
56 plaque brachytherapy
57 primary disease
58 primary indication
59 primary target
60 primary treatment
61 proton therapy
62 radiation
63 radiation dose
64 radiation oncologists
65 radiation therapy techniques
66 radiation treatment
67 rare occurrence
68 recommendations
69 reirradiation
70 retina
71 sensitivity
72 significant efforts
73 sites
74 structure
75 system sites
76 target
77 technique
78 technological advances
79 therapy
80 therapy techniques
81 threshold doses
82 tolerance
83 treatment
84 treatment of tumors
85 tumors
86 schema:name Eye Tumors
87 schema:pagination 143-149
88 schema:productId N277b61ee822f494099ac4d492f10a3e4
89 N7f8826f7053f40b4b23fa9303d3e969a
90 schema:publisher N7ddd30e1030b4016a8d4fdb163c85869
91 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028660358
92 https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_33
93 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-11-24T21:13
94 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
95 schema:sdPublisher N8d8230806d834510b2be71aafda7b586
96 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/174_2016_33
97 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
98 sgo:sdDataset chapters
99 rdf:type schema:Chapter
100 N277b61ee822f494099ac4d492f10a3e4 schema:name dimensions_id
101 schema:value pub.1028660358
102 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
103 N3da88a4d47d64897af85f4aecd36cf34 rdf:first sg:person.01361116472.46
104 rdf:rest Nbb5c2f586688449ca1ea97ff751e5a9c
105 N5867bf3e5245412599169c856442ce40 schema:familyName Nieder
106 schema:givenName Carsten
107 rdf:type schema:Person
108 N6ec6e6acd847498d91e331a14f9b1d20 schema:familyName Langendijk
109 schema:givenName Johannes
110 rdf:type schema:Person
111 N7ddd30e1030b4016a8d4fdb163c85869 schema:name Springer Nature
112 rdf:type schema:Organisation
113 N7f8826f7053f40b4b23fa9303d3e969a schema:name doi
114 schema:value 10.1007/174_2016_33
115 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
116 N89ca76cc85aa4bc9bdc8b16e6ebf13fe rdf:first N6ec6e6acd847498d91e331a14f9b1d20
117 rdf:rest rdf:nil
118 N8d8230806d834510b2be71aafda7b586 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
119 rdf:type schema:Organization
120 N8f1e42b000c64807aa7684300cd82cb0 rdf:first sg:person.0637022555.52
121 rdf:rest rdf:nil
122 Nbb5c2f586688449ca1ea97ff751e5a9c rdf:first sg:person.0752647141.13
123 rdf:rest N8f1e42b000c64807aa7684300cd82cb0
124 Ne9bc5e1ad90d4bec95a2dbf092a2ce24 rdf:first N5867bf3e5245412599169c856442ce40
125 rdf:rest N89ca76cc85aa4bc9bdc8b16e6ebf13fe
126 Nea28482c9f004d788eacf37af6a77ae3 schema:isbn 978-3-319-41823-0
127 978-3-319-41825-4
128 schema:name Re-Irradiation: New Frontiers
129 rdf:type schema:Book
130 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
131 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
132 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
133 anzsrc-for:1113 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
134 schema:name Ophthalmology and Optometry
135 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
136 sg:person.01361116472.46 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.32224.35
137 schema:familyName Shih
138 schema:givenName Helen A.
139 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01361116472.46
140 rdf:type schema:Person
141 sg:person.0637022555.52 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.32224.35
142 schema:familyName Munzenrider
143 schema:givenName John E.
144 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0637022555.52
145 rdf:type schema:Person
146 sg:person.0752647141.13 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.32224.35
147 schema:familyName Trofimov
148 schema:givenName Alexei V.
149 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0752647141.13
150 rdf:type schema:Person
151 grid-institutes:grid.32224.35 schema:alternateName Central Nervous System and Eye Services, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA
152 Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA
153 Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA
154 schema:name Central Nervous System and Eye Services, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA
155 Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA
156 Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, 02114, Boston, MA, USA
157 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...