Feeding biology of oribatid mites in high alpine regions View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2010-2013

FUNDING AMOUNT

N/A

ABSTRACT

Oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) are among the most abundant und species rich taxa of the soil living mesofauna.Presumably they play an important role in decomposition and are significantly engaged in nutrient cycles anddispersal of fungal spores. With densities reaching up to several hundred thousand individuals oribatid mitesdominate mesofauna-communities. The colonization success is multifactorial, and primarily resource availability,reproduction mode and mobility, and secondarily habitat characteristics have to be considered. According to thepresent state of knowledge oribatid mites feed mainly on fungi or detritus, but with noteworthy feedingspecializations on animal tissue or lichen. Oribatid mites display both sexual and parthenogenetic reproduction; thequestion why most species reproduce sexually is still an unresolved problem. Potential explanations areevolutionary constraints, e.g. interactions between food source and animal, or limitation of food resources. Speciescomposition in oribatid mite communities has been investigated frequently and is mainly influenced by habitattype. But the mechanisms for habitat specific colonization success of oribatid mite species are largely unknown.The main objective of this project is understanding mechanisms which lead to spatial distribution patterns oforibatid mites. We hypothesize that species composition in oribatid mite communities are primarily caused bybiotic interactions, mainly availability of resources, which seems to be the strongest factor determining the growthof populations. Furthermore we assume that the percentage of sexual reproducing species increases with altitudesince in higher altitudes food resources are increasingly limited (e.g. fungi), hardly palatable (e.g. lichens) or hardlyaccessible (nematodes as prey) Sexual reproduction should therefore dominate in higher altitudes, where resourcesbecome scarce.We investigate the feeding biology of oribatid mite species along an altitudinal gradient in the Central Alps. Thefeeding biology of oribatid mites will be analyzed with dual stable isotope analysis (13C, 15N). To investigate theresource spectrum of oribatid mites and trophic shifts, food choice experiments will be carried out. Analysis of thegathered data on community structure, reproduction mode and feeding biology of oribatid mites will enhance theknowledge about mechanisms leading to spatial distribution patterns of oribatid mites and their ecologicalrequirements in alpine habitats.This combination of classical and modern methods allows a more detailed insight into the feeding biology, trophicniche differentiation and reproductive mode of oribatid mites than ever, and will substantially contribute to thebasic knowledge in soil zoology and soil ecology in general, and particularly in the field of soil food webs anddistribution patterns of oribatid mite species. More... »

URL

http://pf.fwf.ac.at/en/research-in-practice/project-finder/22259

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2206", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2205", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "description": "Oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) are among the most abundant und species rich taxa of the soil living mesofauna.Presumably they play an important role in decomposition and are significantly engaged in nutrient cycles anddispersal of fungal spores. With densities reaching up to several hundred thousand individuals oribatid mitesdominate mesofauna-communities. The colonization success is multifactorial, and primarily resource availability,reproduction mode and mobility, and secondarily habitat characteristics have to be considered. According to thepresent state of knowledge oribatid mites feed mainly on fungi or detritus, but with noteworthy feedingspecializations on animal tissue or lichen. Oribatid mites display both sexual and parthenogenetic reproduction; thequestion why most species reproduce sexually is still an unresolved problem. Potential explanations areevolutionary constraints, e.g. interactions between food source and animal, or limitation of food resources. Speciescomposition in oribatid mite communities has been investigated frequently and is mainly influenced by habitattype. But the mechanisms for habitat specific colonization success of oribatid mite species are largely unknown.The main objective of this project is understanding mechanisms which lead to spatial distribution patterns oforibatid mites. We hypothesize that species composition in oribatid mite communities are primarily caused bybiotic interactions, mainly availability of resources, which seems to be the strongest factor determining the growthof populations. Furthermore we assume that the percentage of sexual reproducing species increases with altitudesince in higher altitudes food resources are increasingly limited (e.g. fungi), hardly palatable (e.g. lichens) or hardlyaccessible (nematodes as prey) Sexual reproduction should therefore dominate in higher altitudes, where resourcesbecome scarce.We investigate the feeding biology of oribatid mite species along an altitudinal gradient in the Central Alps. Thefeeding biology of oribatid mites will be analyzed with dual stable isotope analysis (13C, 15N). To investigate theresource spectrum of oribatid mites and trophic shifts, food choice experiments will be carried out. Analysis of thegathered data on community structure, reproduction mode and feeding biology of oribatid mites will enhance theknowledge about mechanisms leading to spatial distribution patterns of oribatid mites and their ecologicalrequirements in alpine habitats.This combination of classical and modern methods allows a more detailed insight into the feeding biology, trophicniche differentiation and reproductive mode of oribatid mites than ever, and will substantially contribute to thebasic knowledge in soil zoology and soil ecology in general, and particularly in the field of soil food webs anddistribution patterns of oribatid mite species.", 
    "endDate": "2013-02-28T00:00:00Z", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.25111.36", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.6194656", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "6194656"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "fwf_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "P 22537"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "food choice experiments", 
      "soil zoology", 
      "density", 
      "prey", 
      "high altitude", 
      "growthof populations", 
      "potential explanation", 
      "theknowledge", 
      "bybiotic interactions", 
      "high alpine regions", 
      "trophicniche differentiation", 
      "main objective", 
      "reproduction mode", 
      "availability", 
      "Oribatida", 
      "mesofauna", 
      "Central Alps", 
      "spatial distribution patterns", 
      "knowledge oribatid mites", 
      "decomposition", 
      "data", 
      "food resources", 
      "altitudesince", 
      "higher altitudes food resources", 
      "resources", 
      "limitations", 
      "detritus", 
      "areevolutionary constraints", 
      "parthenogenetic reproduction", 
      "interaction", 
      "mechanism", 
      "field", 
      "soil ecology", 
      "oribatid mite communities", 
      "lichens", 
      "detailed insight", 
      "reproductive mode", 
      "soil food webs anddistribution patterns", 
      "fungi", 
      "Speciescomposition", 
      "individuals", 
      "most species", 
      "habitattype", 
      "species composition", 
      "community structure", 
      "biology", 
      "spectrum", 
      "nutrient cycles anddispersal", 
      "animals", 
      "food sources", 
      "oforibatid mites", 
      "colonization success", 
      "specific colonization success", 
      "soil", 
      "resourcesbecome scarce", 
      "thebasic knowledge", 
      "Acari", 
      "nematodes", 
      "project", 
      "fungal spores", 
      "trophic shift", 
      "strongest factor", 
      "thepresent state", 
      "dual stable isotope analysis", 
      "mobility", 
      "oribatid mitesdominate mesofauna-communities", 
      "feeding biology", 
      "habitat", 
      "ecologicalrequirements", 
      "altitudinal gradient", 
      "alpine habitats", 
      "resource availability", 
      "hardlyaccessible", 
      "oribatid mite species", 
      "rich taxa", 
      "13C", 
      "unresolved problems", 
      "abundant und species", 
      "animal tissues", 
      "sexual reproducing species increases", 
      "percentage", 
      "analysis", 
      "habitat characteristics", 
      "oribatid mites", 
      "important role", 
      "thequestion", 
      "modern methods", 
      "noteworthy feedingspecializations", 
      "sexual reproduction", 
      "combination"
    ], 
    "name": "Feeding biology of oribatid mites in high alpine regions", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5771.4", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5771.4", 
          "name": "Universit\u00e4t Innsbruck", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "MEYER", 
        "givenName": "Erwin", 
        "id": "sg:person.01260205233.50", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.01260205233.50", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.6194656"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T11:31", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/fwf_projects.xml.gz", 
    "startDate": "2010-06-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://pf.fwf.ac.at/en/research-in-practice/project-finder/22259"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.6194656'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.6194656'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.6194656'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.6194656'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

133 TRIPLES      18 PREDICATES      112 URIs      103 LITERALS      4 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.6194656 schema:about anzsrc-for:2205
2 anzsrc-for:2206
3 schema:description Oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) are among the most abundant und species rich taxa of the soil living mesofauna.Presumably they play an important role in decomposition and are significantly engaged in nutrient cycles anddispersal of fungal spores. With densities reaching up to several hundred thousand individuals oribatid mitesdominate mesofauna-communities. The colonization success is multifactorial, and primarily resource availability,reproduction mode and mobility, and secondarily habitat characteristics have to be considered. According to thepresent state of knowledge oribatid mites feed mainly on fungi or detritus, but with noteworthy feedingspecializations on animal tissue or lichen. Oribatid mites display both sexual and parthenogenetic reproduction; thequestion why most species reproduce sexually is still an unresolved problem. Potential explanations areevolutionary constraints, e.g. interactions between food source and animal, or limitation of food resources. Speciescomposition in oribatid mite communities has been investigated frequently and is mainly influenced by habitattype. But the mechanisms for habitat specific colonization success of oribatid mite species are largely unknown.The main objective of this project is understanding mechanisms which lead to spatial distribution patterns oforibatid mites. We hypothesize that species composition in oribatid mite communities are primarily caused bybiotic interactions, mainly availability of resources, which seems to be the strongest factor determining the growthof populations. Furthermore we assume that the percentage of sexual reproducing species increases with altitudesince in higher altitudes food resources are increasingly limited (e.g. fungi), hardly palatable (e.g. lichens) or hardlyaccessible (nematodes as prey) Sexual reproduction should therefore dominate in higher altitudes, where resourcesbecome scarce.We investigate the feeding biology of oribatid mite species along an altitudinal gradient in the Central Alps. Thefeeding biology of oribatid mites will be analyzed with dual stable isotope analysis (13C, 15N). To investigate theresource spectrum of oribatid mites and trophic shifts, food choice experiments will be carried out. Analysis of thegathered data on community structure, reproduction mode and feeding biology of oribatid mites will enhance theknowledge about mechanisms leading to spatial distribution patterns of oribatid mites and their ecologicalrequirements in alpine habitats.This combination of classical and modern methods allows a more detailed insight into the feeding biology, trophicniche differentiation and reproductive mode of oribatid mites than ever, and will substantially contribute to thebasic knowledge in soil zoology and soil ecology in general, and particularly in the field of soil food webs anddistribution patterns of oribatid mite species.
4 schema:endDate 2013-02-28T00:00:00Z
5 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.25111.36
6 schema:identifier N2dfb9cbd976343219cb266f47ea2e674
7 N3126e920c66d42a986c37a227a693e6a
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:keywords 13C
10 Acari
11 Central Alps
12 Oribatida
13 Speciescomposition
14 abundant und species
15 alpine habitats
16 altitudesince
17 altitudinal gradient
18 analysis
19 animal tissues
20 animals
21 areevolutionary constraints
22 availability
23 biology
24 bybiotic interactions
25 colonization success
26 combination
27 community structure
28 data
29 decomposition
30 density
31 detailed insight
32 detritus
33 dual stable isotope analysis
34 ecologicalrequirements
35 feeding biology
36 field
37 food choice experiments
38 food resources
39 food sources
40 fungal spores
41 fungi
42 growthof populations
43 habitat
44 habitat characteristics
45 habitattype
46 hardlyaccessible
47 high alpine regions
48 high altitude
49 higher altitudes food resources
50 important role
51 individuals
52 interaction
53 knowledge oribatid mites
54 lichens
55 limitations
56 main objective
57 mechanism
58 mesofauna
59 mobility
60 modern methods
61 most species
62 nematodes
63 noteworthy feedingspecializations
64 nutrient cycles anddispersal
65 oforibatid mites
66 oribatid mite communities
67 oribatid mite species
68 oribatid mites
69 oribatid mitesdominate mesofauna-communities
70 parthenogenetic reproduction
71 percentage
72 potential explanation
73 prey
74 project
75 reproduction mode
76 reproductive mode
77 resource availability
78 resources
79 resourcesbecome scarce
80 rich taxa
81 sexual reproducing species increases
82 sexual reproduction
83 soil
84 soil ecology
85 soil food webs anddistribution patterns
86 soil zoology
87 spatial distribution patterns
88 species composition
89 specific colonization success
90 spectrum
91 strongest factor
92 thebasic knowledge
93 theknowledge
94 thepresent state
95 thequestion
96 trophic shift
97 trophicniche differentiation
98 unresolved problems
99 schema:name Feeding biology of oribatid mites in high alpine regions
100 schema:recipient Nce496ed8deef4ce995c488bc071f8aac
101 sg:person.01260205233.50
102 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5771.4
103 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.6194656
104 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T11:31
105 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
106 schema:sdPublisher N400985c6c3d04f9cae534d0aa75f1f33
107 schema:startDate 2010-06-01T00:00:00Z
108 schema:url http://pf.fwf.ac.at/en/research-in-practice/project-finder/22259
109 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
110 sgo:sdDataset grants
111 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
112 N2dfb9cbd976343219cb266f47ea2e674 schema:name fwf_id
113 schema:value P 22537
114 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
115 N3126e920c66d42a986c37a227a693e6a schema:name dimensions_id
116 schema:value 6194656
117 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
118 N400985c6c3d04f9cae534d0aa75f1f33 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
119 rdf:type schema:Organization
120 Nce496ed8deef4ce995c488bc071f8aac schema:member sg:person.01260205233.50
121 schema:roleName PI
122 rdf:type schema:Role
123 anzsrc-for:2205 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
124 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
125 anzsrc-for:2206 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
126 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
127 sg:person.01260205233.50 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5771.4
128 schema:familyName MEYER
129 schema:givenName Erwin
130 rdf:type schema:Person
131 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.25111.36 schema:Organization
132 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5771.4 schema:name Universität Innsbruck
133 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...