Investigating The Relationship Between Climate Change And Social Organization In A Small Scale Society View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2015-2017

FUNDING AMOUNT

103058 USD

ABSTRACT

One of the most pressing issues in modern times is the effect that climate change will have on populations. Archaeological studies are critical for understanding these issues, as they offer important time depth to understand how societies respond and adapt to environmental stress. This study examines the relationship between "collapse", including the breakdown of political systems and the abandonment of urban centers, with climate change in the Maya Lowlands. Previous research has documented climatic drying from AD 660-1100, with intervals of severe multi-decadal drought identified in the ninth through eleventh centuries. This timeframe generally correlates with the "Classic Maya collapse" between AD 750-1000. It is thought that extended episodes of low precipitation caused crop failures that undermined economic and political systems throughout the region. However, current archaeological studies are based on ceramic chronologies that often span hundreds of years and hinder clear identification of temporal relationships. The researchers will develop a high-resolution radiocarbon chronology to identify chronological correlations between periods of collapse and drought or lack thereof. Within the broader context, this project will help to understand the interactions between demography, the disintegration of political systems in the Maya lowlands, and climate change. The research will contribute to training undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers, in addition to offering educational opportunities for local Maya communities in Belize. This project will help to answer several important questions. Does political collapse and abandonment at the end of the Classic period correlate with extended drought episodes? Did some centers persist longer during droughts than others? What environmental or cultural adaptations may have helped populations to adapt to increasing aridity? Excavations at two archaeological sites in the central Maya Lowlands will focus on expanding the existing sample of burial and animal bone samples for dating. Results from the radiocarbon dates will be compared with a precisely dated speleothem record from southern Belize to test for temporal relationships between drought and collapse. Osteological data from burials will also be compared with these patterns to identify increased nutritional deficiencies that may have been caused by famine from agricultural shortages. Together, this interdisciplinary scientific work will examine whether multi-decadal droughts contributed to agricultural failure, the breakdown of political systems, and the abandonment of Classic Maya urban centers. More... »

URL

http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1460369&HistoricalAwards=false

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2221", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "USD", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": "103058"
    }, 
    "description": "One of the most pressing issues in modern times is the effect that climate change will have on populations. Archaeological studies are critical for understanding these issues, as they offer important time depth to understand how societies respond and adapt to environmental stress. This study examines the relationship between \"collapse\", including the breakdown of political systems and the abandonment of urban centers, with climate change in the Maya Lowlands. Previous research has documented climatic drying from AD 660-1100, with intervals of severe multi-decadal drought identified in the ninth through eleventh centuries. This timeframe generally correlates with the \"Classic Maya collapse\" between AD 750-1000. It is thought that extended episodes of low precipitation caused crop failures that undermined economic and political systems throughout the region. However, current archaeological studies are based on ceramic chronologies that often span hundreds of years and hinder clear identification of temporal relationships. The researchers will develop a high-resolution radiocarbon chronology to identify chronological correlations between periods of collapse and drought or lack thereof. Within the broader context, this project will help to understand the interactions between demography, the disintegration of political systems in the Maya lowlands, and climate change. The research will contribute to training undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers, in addition to offering educational opportunities for local Maya communities in Belize. This project will help to answer several important questions. Does political collapse and abandonment at the end of the Classic period correlate with extended drought episodes? Did some centers persist longer during droughts than others? What environmental or cultural adaptations may have helped populations to adapt to increasing aridity? Excavations at two archaeological sites in the central Maya Lowlands will focus on expanding the existing sample of burial and animal bone samples for dating. Results from the radiocarbon dates will be compared with a precisely dated speleothem record from southern Belize to test for temporal relationships between drought and collapse. Osteological data from burials will also be compared with these patterns to identify increased nutritional deficiencies that may have been caused by famine from agricultural shortages. Together, this interdisciplinary scientific work will examine whether multi-decadal droughts contributed to agricultural failure, the breakdown of political systems, and the abandonment of Classic Maya urban centers.", 
    "endDate": "2017-02-28T00:00:00Z", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.457916.8", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.3934895", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "3934895"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nsf_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "1460369"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "center", 
      "collapse", 
      "drought", 
      "environmental stress", 
      "abandonment", 
      "addition", 
      "burial", 
      "osteological data", 
      "interval", 
      "clear identification", 
      "breakdown", 
      "climate change", 
      "important time depth", 
      "climatic drying", 
      "current archaeological studies", 
      "crop failure", 
      "Classic Maya urban centers", 
      "results", 
      "demography", 
      "Classic period", 
      "AD 660", 
      "broader context", 
      "study", 
      "archaeological studies", 
      "animal bone samples", 
      "high-resolution radiocarbon chronology", 
      "archaeological sites", 
      "southern Belize", 
      "eleventh century", 
      "training undergraduates", 
      "modern times", 
      "episodes", 
      "extended drought episodes", 
      "political system", 
      "previous research", 
      "chronological correlation", 
      "ceramic chronology", 
      "severe multi-decadal drought", 
      "timeframe", 
      "researchers", 
      "issues", 
      "social organization", 
      "aridity", 
      "region", 
      "low precipitation", 
      "temporal relationship", 
      "postdoctoral researchers", 
      "population", 
      "Maya Lowlands", 
      "pattern", 
      "samples", 
      "hundreds", 
      "project", 
      "urban centers", 
      "small scale societies", 
      "research", 
      "AD 750", 
      "graduate students", 
      "educational opportunities", 
      "agricultural shortages", 
      "end", 
      "effect", 
      "society", 
      "speleothem records", 
      "excavation", 
      "local Maya communities", 
      "agricultural failure", 
      "period", 
      "disintegration", 
      "Maya lowlands", 
      "political collapse", 
      "interdisciplinary scientific work", 
      "Belize", 
      "interaction", 
      "famine", 
      "cultural adaptation", 
      "multi-decadal drought", 
      "others", 
      "Central Maya Lowlands", 
      "radiocarbon dates", 
      "nutritional deficiencies", 
      "Classic Maya", 
      "years", 
      "relationship", 
      "pressing issues", 
      "several important questions", 
      "lack"
    ], 
    "name": "Investigating The Relationship Between Climate Change And Social Organization In A Small Scale Society", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31", 
          "name": "Pennsylvania State Univ University Park", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Kennett", 
        "givenName": "Douglas", 
        "id": "sg:person.0742021107.13", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.0742021107.13", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31", 
          "name": "Pennsylvania State Univ University Park", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Hoggarth", 
        "givenName": "Julie", 
        "id": "sg:person.010445755643.92", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.010445755643.92", 
        "roleName": "Co-PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31", 
          "name": "Pennsylvania State Univ University Park", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Culleton", 
        "givenName": "Brendan", 
        "id": "sg:person.0656355062.36", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.0656355062.36", 
        "roleName": "Co-PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.3934895"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T12:37", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/nsf_projects_7.xml.gz", 
    "startDate": "2015-03-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1460369&HistoricalAwards=false"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3934895'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3934895'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3934895'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3934895'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

149 TRIPLES      19 PREDICATES      113 URIs      103 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.3934895 schema:about anzsrc-for:2221
2 schema:amount N073bdb1629fd4aa69a193869f3121869
3 schema:description One of the most pressing issues in modern times is the effect that climate change will have on populations. Archaeological studies are critical for understanding these issues, as they offer important time depth to understand how societies respond and adapt to environmental stress. This study examines the relationship between "collapse", including the breakdown of political systems and the abandonment of urban centers, with climate change in the Maya Lowlands. Previous research has documented climatic drying from AD 660-1100, with intervals of severe multi-decadal drought identified in the ninth through eleventh centuries. This timeframe generally correlates with the "Classic Maya collapse" between AD 750-1000. It is thought that extended episodes of low precipitation caused crop failures that undermined economic and political systems throughout the region. However, current archaeological studies are based on ceramic chronologies that often span hundreds of years and hinder clear identification of temporal relationships. The researchers will develop a high-resolution radiocarbon chronology to identify chronological correlations between periods of collapse and drought or lack thereof. Within the broader context, this project will help to understand the interactions between demography, the disintegration of political systems in the Maya lowlands, and climate change. The research will contribute to training undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers, in addition to offering educational opportunities for local Maya communities in Belize. This project will help to answer several important questions. Does political collapse and abandonment at the end of the Classic period correlate with extended drought episodes? Did some centers persist longer during droughts than others? What environmental or cultural adaptations may have helped populations to adapt to increasing aridity? Excavations at two archaeological sites in the central Maya Lowlands will focus on expanding the existing sample of burial and animal bone samples for dating. Results from the radiocarbon dates will be compared with a precisely dated speleothem record from southern Belize to test for temporal relationships between drought and collapse. Osteological data from burials will also be compared with these patterns to identify increased nutritional deficiencies that may have been caused by famine from agricultural shortages. Together, this interdisciplinary scientific work will examine whether multi-decadal droughts contributed to agricultural failure, the breakdown of political systems, and the abandonment of Classic Maya urban centers.
4 schema:endDate 2017-02-28T00:00:00Z
5 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.457916.8
6 schema:identifier Ncf5bab4b844f427cb975e1bd687f4c28
7 Nd4842f90d3654da1ba45ecd899742b61
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:keywords AD 660
10 AD 750
11 Belize
12 Central Maya Lowlands
13 Classic Maya
14 Classic Maya urban centers
15 Classic period
16 Maya Lowlands
17 Maya lowlands
18 abandonment
19 addition
20 agricultural failure
21 agricultural shortages
22 animal bone samples
23 archaeological sites
24 archaeological studies
25 aridity
26 breakdown
27 broader context
28 burial
29 center
30 ceramic chronology
31 chronological correlation
32 clear identification
33 climate change
34 climatic drying
35 collapse
36 crop failure
37 cultural adaptation
38 current archaeological studies
39 demography
40 disintegration
41 drought
42 educational opportunities
43 effect
44 eleventh century
45 end
46 environmental stress
47 episodes
48 excavation
49 extended drought episodes
50 famine
51 graduate students
52 high-resolution radiocarbon chronology
53 hundreds
54 important time depth
55 interaction
56 interdisciplinary scientific work
57 interval
58 issues
59 lack
60 local Maya communities
61 low precipitation
62 modern times
63 multi-decadal drought
64 nutritional deficiencies
65 osteological data
66 others
67 pattern
68 period
69 political collapse
70 political system
71 population
72 postdoctoral researchers
73 pressing issues
74 previous research
75 project
76 radiocarbon dates
77 region
78 relationship
79 research
80 researchers
81 results
82 samples
83 several important questions
84 severe multi-decadal drought
85 small scale societies
86 social organization
87 society
88 southern Belize
89 speleothem records
90 study
91 temporal relationship
92 timeframe
93 training undergraduates
94 urban centers
95 years
96 schema:name Investigating The Relationship Between Climate Change And Social Organization In A Small Scale Society
97 schema:recipient N4ce1e1cc06b04dc3bf93ea5c020b9d3e
98 N6778583699c541d0be74f0c4ac2ca2e9
99 Nbd73bb175a5f465da729051d98b7f4bf
100 sg:person.010445755643.92
101 sg:person.0656355062.36
102 sg:person.0742021107.13
103 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31
104 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.3934895
105 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T12:37
106 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
107 schema:sdPublisher N452373875e20438e8e8910ce84d99e28
108 schema:startDate 2015-03-01T00:00:00Z
109 schema:url http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1460369&HistoricalAwards=false
110 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
111 sgo:sdDataset grants
112 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
113 N073bdb1629fd4aa69a193869f3121869 schema:currency USD
114 schema:value 103058
115 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
116 N452373875e20438e8e8910ce84d99e28 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
117 rdf:type schema:Organization
118 N4ce1e1cc06b04dc3bf93ea5c020b9d3e schema:member sg:person.0656355062.36
119 schema:roleName Co-PI
120 rdf:type schema:Role
121 N6778583699c541d0be74f0c4ac2ca2e9 schema:member sg:person.0742021107.13
122 schema:roleName PI
123 rdf:type schema:Role
124 Nbd73bb175a5f465da729051d98b7f4bf schema:member sg:person.010445755643.92
125 schema:roleName Co-PI
126 rdf:type schema:Role
127 Ncf5bab4b844f427cb975e1bd687f4c28 schema:name dimensions_id
128 schema:value 3934895
129 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
130 Nd4842f90d3654da1ba45ecd899742b61 schema:name nsf_id
131 schema:value 1460369
132 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
133 anzsrc-for:2221 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
134 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
135 sg:person.010445755643.92 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31
136 schema:familyName Hoggarth
137 schema:givenName Julie
138 rdf:type schema:Person
139 sg:person.0656355062.36 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31
140 schema:familyName Culleton
141 schema:givenName Brendan
142 rdf:type schema:Person
143 sg:person.0742021107.13 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31
144 schema:familyName Kennett
145 schema:givenName Douglas
146 rdf:type schema:Person
147 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.29857.31 schema:name Pennsylvania State Univ University Park
148 rdf:type schema:Organization
149 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.457916.8 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...