The Dissolution of the Japanese Empire and the Struggle for Legitimacy in Postwar East Asia, 1945-1965 View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2013-2019

FUNDING AMOUNT

1463924 EUR

ABSTRACT

This five-year project aims to understand how political rule and legal authority were redrafted in postwar East Asia after the Japanese surrender in 1945. The research will shed light on the social and political transformations that continue to have deep resonance in our world in the form of East Asia’s regional alliances and Japan’s relations with its closest neighbors – China, North and South Korea, and Taiwan. The renovation of East Asia after the fall of the Japanese empire has mainly been written from a western perspective, owing to the preponderance of postwar American scholarship and its political dominance, but also the systematic declassification and easy access to government and private archival papers. Even with the economic rise and growing importance of contemporary China, the region’s understanding of its own past and its internal dynamics remain deeply rooted to the contours of the manner in which World War II ended. This narrative is linked to the process of how Japanese imperial rule was judged at the local level through war crimes trials and the pursuit of justice against imperial supporters. The search for war criminals, collaborators or suspected traitors offered a means to resolve the upturned former imperial hierarchies, dealing with grudges and finding justice for committed atrocities. Such moves demonstrated that the new authorities were “just,” a crucial element to bolster domestic and international mobilization campaigns for support. This new research makes clear that Japan’s sudden surrender in no way signified that the country would immediately disavow its extensive imperial ideology; such a move would require a long time to inculcate. More... »

URL

http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/105650_en.html

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