Thermosyphon Solar Energy Water Heating For A Group Of Three Dwellings View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

1984-1987

FUNDING AMOUNT

57759 EUR

ABSTRACT

To demonstrate on three inhabited houses; - the contribution that a thermosyphon solar-energy water heater can make to satisfy typical domestic hot-water requirements; - the effect of different hot-water consumption patterns on the long-term solar-energy contribution to the domestic hot-water requirement; - the reliability and effectiveness of three different methods of protecting the system from damage due to freezing of the circulating liquid. To provide a realistic data base upon which a detailed economic analysis can be undertaken, and criteria for selecting heating systems established according to locality. Total energy production was 0.2 TOE/year; payback 48 years. INSTALLATION PROCEDURE The total installation time of one system was approximately 2 man days. But considerable time was additionally lost due to bad weather conditions, insufficient material delivery and waiting time of the arrival of tradespersons with particular skills. A further substantial reduction of these 2 man days seems unrealistic. Skilled and interested workmen are of highest importance for a solar installation. INSTALLATION EXPERIENCE The collectors weight was 63 kg, which is very heavy and therefore difficult to handle. The glass reinforced plastic collector box was prone to cracking at the mounting points. The piping connection to the collector was too short. Hence the collector employed did not ensure a simple and efficient installation. The collectors were left empty on the roof during three weeks. Laying stagnant under levels of high insulation, the selective coating (MAXORB) did not withstand the high temperature of 150 C, it began to wrinkle and to peel. FROSTPROTECTION Only the glycol filled installation withstood the frost periods during winter time. The drain down system as well as the electric heating system failed and these two solar system were seriously damaged. USER RESPONSE The handling of a third tap for solar heated water proved to be not practical. The user had to wait when using this tap, and was never sure if the solar heated water was at an acceptable temperature level. A remote temperature indication is necessary for such kind of installation. A preheating mode yields higher solar fractions. THERMAL RESULTS The overall solar fraction was expected to be 40%. After thirteen months of monitoring the average of the glycol filled third tap installation was 17% with a maximum of 37% in July 1986. The highest daily solar fractions recorded for the different houses were 92%; 57%; and 68%. The third tap installation was not successful due to the negative user response. The overall efficiency of all system has to be considered aspoor, but could be improved by optimizing the different componants e.g. by a better thermal isolation of the total installation in the loft. The monitoring results of the solar plants yielded a payback time between 35 and 48 years. Three basically identical thermosyphonic solar-energy water-heating systems have been installed on three adjacent dwellings. These houses are owned by the Cranfield Institute of Technology and are normally occupied by married students and their families. During the three year monitoring period the three houses were occupied by five different families, thus the effect of up to five different patterns of hot-water consumption on the system's performance could be demonstrated. These houses are typical of many in rural areas of Europe in that they are some distance away from a mains gas-supply. All three houses employed originally coal-fired back-boilers for water heating with an additional electric immersion element water-heating : both these systems being manually controlled. One of the dwellings has since been converted to oil-fired to radiator central and water heating. Each of the three systems installed provide 1.8-2.0 GJ per annum which constitutes approximately 20% of the annual energy requirement for hot-water production of each dwelling. In two of the houses the solar-heated water is provided directly to the points of use by means of a third-tap on the bath and the basins. The occupants of the houses receive instructions to try the third tap first when hot water is required, running it for a short while to draw off any cool water in the supply pipe, and then (if the water temperature is hot enough) continue to use it until the temperature falls below that desired. Each system comprises the following elements : A 4m2 flat-plate solar-energy collector single-glazed with a selectively coated surface. Each unit is mounted "on-tile" with fixing bolts through the rafters. The roof is properly sealed and weather-proofed. A 200 litre hot-water store and vent, insulated on all surfaces by a 5 cm thick layer of fibrous insulant. A 12 litre independent unpressurized cold-water header tank. A hot water supply pipe to provide solar-heated water to three additional taps located above the kitchen sink, the bathroom hand-basin and the bath respectively in two of the dwellings. All thermosyphon flow circuits are manufactured from light gauge 22 mm diameter copper to reduce flow resistance. There are no acute pipe bends and all pipe-work is approximately inclined to prevent air locks. A drain facility is provided in the lowest point in the thermosyphon flow circuit. The systems installed also differ in their respective methods of preventing damage due to freezing. In one unit, an electrical heating element taped to the lower header of the collector, heats the water in the collector when the temperature falls below zero. The second system is of the automatic "drain-down" type. The third system contains antifreeze and heats DHW via a heat exchanger. More... »

URL

http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/18640_en.html

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2209", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "EUR", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": "57759"
    }, 
    "description": "To demonstrate on three inhabited houses;\n- the contribution that a thermosyphon solar-energy water heater can make to satisfy typical domestic hot-water requirements;\n- the effect of different hot-water consumption patterns on the long-term solar-energy contribution to the domestic hot-water requirement;\n- the reliability and effectiveness of three different methods of protecting the system from damage due to freezing of the circulating liquid.\nTo provide a realistic data base upon which a detailed economic analysis can be undertaken, and criteria for selecting heating systems established according to locality.\nTotal energy production was 0.2 TOE/year; payback 48 years.\nINSTALLATION PROCEDURE\nThe total installation time of one system was approximately 2 man days. But considerable time was additionally lost due to bad weather conditions, insufficient material delivery and waiting time of the arrival of tradespersons with particular skills. A further substantial reduction of these 2 man days seems unrealistic. Skilled and interested workmen are of highest importance for a solar installation.\nINSTALLATION EXPERIENCE\nThe collectors weight was 63 kg, which is very heavy and therefore difficult to handle. The glass reinforced plastic collector box was prone to cracking at the mounting points. The piping connection to the collector was too short. Hence the collector employed did not ensure a simple and efficient installation. The collectors were left empty on the roof during three weeks. Laying stagnant under levels of high insulation, the selective coating (MAXORB) did not withstand the high temperature of 150 C, it began to wrinkle and to peel.\nFROSTPROTECTION\nOnly the glycol filled installation withstood the frost periods during winter time. The drain down system as well as the electric heating system failed and these two solar system were seriously damaged.\nUSER RESPONSE\nThe handling of a third tap for solar heated water proved to be not practical. The user had to wait when using this tap, and was never sure if the solar heated water was at an acceptable temperature level. A remote temperature indication is necessary for such kind of installation. A preheating mode yields higher solar fractions.\nTHERMAL RESULTS\nThe overall solar fraction was expected to be 40%. After thirteen months of monitoring the average of the glycol filled third tap installation was 17% with a maximum of 37% in July 1986. The highest daily solar fractions recorded for the different houses were 92%; 57%; and 68%. The third tap installation was not successful due to the negative user response. The overall efficiency of all system has to be considered aspoor, but could be improved by optimizing the different componants e.g. by a better thermal isolation of the total installation in the loft. The monitoring results of the solar plants yielded a payback time between 35 and 48 years.\nThree basically identical thermosyphonic solar-energy water-heating systems have been installed on three adjacent dwellings. These houses are owned by the Cranfield Institute of Technology and are normally occupied by married students and their families. During the three year monitoring period the three houses were occupied by five different families, thus the effect of up to five different patterns of hot-water consumption on the system's performance could be demonstrated. These houses are typical of many in rural areas of Europe in that they are some distance away from a mains gas-supply. All three houses employed originally coal-fired back-boilers for water heating with an additional electric immersion element water-heating : both these systems being manually controlled. One of the dwellings has since been converted to oil-fired to radiator central and water heating. Each of the three systems installed provide 1.8-2.0 GJ per annum which constitutes approximately 20% of the annual energy requirement for hot-water production of each dwelling.\nIn two of the houses the solar-heated water is provided directly to the points of use by means of a third-tap on the bath and the basins. The occupants of the houses receive instructions to try the third tap first when hot water is required, running it for a short while to draw off any cool water in the supply pipe, and then (if the water temperature is hot enough) continue to use it until the temperature falls below that desired.\nEach system comprises the following elements :\nA 4m2 flat-plate solar-energy collector single-glazed with a selectively coated surface. Each unit is mounted \"on-tile\" with fixing bolts through the rafters. The roof is properly sealed and weather-proofed.\nA 200 litre hot-water store and vent, insulated on all surfaces by a 5 cm thick layer of fibrous insulant.\nA 12 litre independent unpressurized cold-water header tank.\nA hot water supply pipe to provide solar-heated water to three additional taps located above the kitchen sink, the bathroom hand-basin and the bath respectively in two of the dwellings.\nAll thermosyphon flow circuits are manufactured from light gauge 22 mm diameter copper to reduce flow resistance. There are no acute pipe bends and all pipe-work is approximately inclined to prevent air locks. A drain facility is provided in the lowest point in the thermosyphon flow circuit. The systems installed also differ in their respective methods of preventing damage due to freezing. In one unit, an electrical heating element taped to the lower header of the collector, heats the water in the collector when the temperature falls below zero. The second system is of the automatic \"drain-down\" type. The third system contains antifreeze and heats DHW via a heat exchanger.\n", 
    "endDate": "1987-12-31T00:00:00Z", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.270680.b", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.3711804", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "3711804"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "cordis_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "18640"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "inhabited houses", 
      "interested workmen", 
      "following elements", 
      "boiler", 
      "years", 
      "mode yields", 
      "selective coatings", 
      "acceptable temperature level", 
      "thermosyphon flow circuit", 
      "July 1986", 
      "mains gas-supply", 
      "distance", 
      "identical thermosyphonic solar-energy water-heating systems", 
      "radiator", 
      "adjacent dwellings", 
      "overall efficiency", 
      "man days", 
      "collectors weight", 
      "toe/year", 
      "system", 
      "annum", 
      "high solar fraction", 
      "hot-water consumption", 
      "third system", 
      "MAXORB", 
      "rafters", 
      "payback 48 years", 
      "instruction", 
      "acute pipe bends", 
      "light gauge 22 mm diameter copper", 
      "different hot-water consumption patterns", 
      "additional taps", 
      "drain", 
      "typical domestic hot-water requirements", 
      "dwellings", 
      "bathroom hand-basin", 
      "independent unpressurized cold-water header tank", 
      "hot-water store", 
      "married students", 
      "aspoor", 
      "installation", 
      "FROSTPROTECTION", 
      "type", 
      "third tap", 
      "additional electric immersion element water-heating", 
      "average", 
      "freezing", 
      "basin", 
      "tiles", 
      "GJ", 
      "oil", 
      "water heating", 
      "bath", 
      "liter", 
      "insufficient material delivery", 
      "total energy production", 
      "cm thick layer", 
      "overall solar fraction", 
      "electric heating system", 
      "vent", 
      "effect", 
      "rural areas", 
      "particular skills", 
      "cool water", 
      "total installation time", 
      "coal", 
      "total installation", 
      "year monitoring period", 
      "system performance", 
      "fibrous insulant", 
      "frost period", 
      "negative user response", 
      "efficient installation", 
      "hot-water production", 
      "electrical heating elements", 
      "thermosyphon solar-energy water heater", 
      "solar-heated water", 
      "respective methods", 
      "high importance", 
      "glass", 
      "localities", 
      "time", 
      "contribution", 
      "Europe", 
      "air lock", 
      "surface", 
      "use", 
      "installation experience", 
      "users", 
      "heats DHW", 
      "substantial reduction", 
      "bolts", 
      "hot water supply pipe", 
      "realistic data base", 
      "high insulation", 
      "domestic hot-water requirement", 
      "THERMAL RESULTS", 
      "such kind", 
      "drain facility", 
      "user responses", 
      "effectiveness", 
      "long-term solar-energy contribution", 
      "levels", 
      "remote temperature indication", 
      "solar installation", 
      "liquid", 
      "THERMOSYPHON SOLAR ENERGY WATER", 
      "family", 
      "different componants", 
      "reliability", 
      "flow resistance", 
      "kitchen", 
      "lowest point", 
      "annual energy requirements", 
      "months", 
      "heating system", 
      "house", 
      "heat exchanger", 
      "different houses", 
      "good thermal isolation", 
      "hot water", 
      "supply pipes", 
      "bad weather conditions", 
      "water", 
      "loft", 
      "handling", 
      "solar system", 
      "piping connections", 
      "installation procedure", 
      "short while", 
      "collector", 
      "different patterns", 
      "different methods", 
      "plastic collector box", 
      "arrival", 
      "units", 
      "considerable time", 
      "roof", 
      "water temperature", 
      "third tap installation", 
      "Cranfield Institute", 
      "point", 
      "solar plant", 
      "criteria", 
      "groups", 
      "monitoring results", 
      "maximum", 
      "high temperature", 
      "detailed economic analysis", 
      "different families", 
      "THREE DWELLINGS", 
      "antifreeze", 
      "kg", 
      "weather-proofed", 
      "flat-plate solar-energy collector", 
      "winter time", 
      "lower header", 
      "TAP", 
      "payback time", 
      "weeks", 
      "damage", 
      "tradespersons", 
      "technology", 
      "means", 
      "pipe-work", 
      "occupants", 
      "temperature", 
      "glycol", 
      "solar heated water", 
      "second system", 
      "highest daily solar fractions"
    ], 
    "name": "THERMOSYPHON SOLAR ENERGY WATER HEATING FOR A GROUP OF THREE DWELLINGS", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.12026.37", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.3711804"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T11:20", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/cordis_projects.xml.gz", 
    "startDate": "1984-07-30T00:00:00Z", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/18640_en.html"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3711804'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3711804'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3711804'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3711804'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

205 TRIPLES      19 PREDICATES      191 URIs      184 LITERALS      4 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.3711804 schema:about anzsrc-for:2209
2 schema:amount Necb0e3b2ea5d4f8ab4615c86cdc12174
3 schema:description To demonstrate on three inhabited houses; - the contribution that a thermosyphon solar-energy water heater can make to satisfy typical domestic hot-water requirements; - the effect of different hot-water consumption patterns on the long-term solar-energy contribution to the domestic hot-water requirement; - the reliability and effectiveness of three different methods of protecting the system from damage due to freezing of the circulating liquid. To provide a realistic data base upon which a detailed economic analysis can be undertaken, and criteria for selecting heating systems established according to locality. Total energy production was 0.2 TOE/year; payback 48 years. INSTALLATION PROCEDURE The total installation time of one system was approximately 2 man days. But considerable time was additionally lost due to bad weather conditions, insufficient material delivery and waiting time of the arrival of tradespersons with particular skills. A further substantial reduction of these 2 man days seems unrealistic. Skilled and interested workmen are of highest importance for a solar installation. INSTALLATION EXPERIENCE The collectors weight was 63 kg, which is very heavy and therefore difficult to handle. The glass reinforced plastic collector box was prone to cracking at the mounting points. The piping connection to the collector was too short. Hence the collector employed did not ensure a simple and efficient installation. The collectors were left empty on the roof during three weeks. Laying stagnant under levels of high insulation, the selective coating (MAXORB) did not withstand the high temperature of 150 C, it began to wrinkle and to peel. FROSTPROTECTION Only the glycol filled installation withstood the frost periods during winter time. The drain down system as well as the electric heating system failed and these two solar system were seriously damaged. USER RESPONSE The handling of a third tap for solar heated water proved to be not practical. The user had to wait when using this tap, and was never sure if the solar heated water was at an acceptable temperature level. A remote temperature indication is necessary for such kind of installation. A preheating mode yields higher solar fractions. THERMAL RESULTS The overall solar fraction was expected to be 40%. After thirteen months of monitoring the average of the glycol filled third tap installation was 17% with a maximum of 37% in July 1986. The highest daily solar fractions recorded for the different houses were 92%; 57%; and 68%. The third tap installation was not successful due to the negative user response. The overall efficiency of all system has to be considered aspoor, but could be improved by optimizing the different componants e.g. by a better thermal isolation of the total installation in the loft. The monitoring results of the solar plants yielded a payback time between 35 and 48 years. Three basically identical thermosyphonic solar-energy water-heating systems have been installed on three adjacent dwellings. These houses are owned by the Cranfield Institute of Technology and are normally occupied by married students and their families. During the three year monitoring period the three houses were occupied by five different families, thus the effect of up to five different patterns of hot-water consumption on the system's performance could be demonstrated. These houses are typical of many in rural areas of Europe in that they are some distance away from a mains gas-supply. All three houses employed originally coal-fired back-boilers for water heating with an additional electric immersion element water-heating : both these systems being manually controlled. One of the dwellings has since been converted to oil-fired to radiator central and water heating. Each of the three systems installed provide 1.8-2.0 GJ per annum which constitutes approximately 20% of the annual energy requirement for hot-water production of each dwelling. In two of the houses the solar-heated water is provided directly to the points of use by means of a third-tap on the bath and the basins. The occupants of the houses receive instructions to try the third tap first when hot water is required, running it for a short while to draw off any cool water in the supply pipe, and then (if the water temperature is hot enough) continue to use it until the temperature falls below that desired. Each system comprises the following elements : A 4m2 flat-plate solar-energy collector single-glazed with a selectively coated surface. Each unit is mounted "on-tile" with fixing bolts through the rafters. The roof is properly sealed and weather-proofed. A 200 litre hot-water store and vent, insulated on all surfaces by a 5 cm thick layer of fibrous insulant. A 12 litre independent unpressurized cold-water header tank. A hot water supply pipe to provide solar-heated water to three additional taps located above the kitchen sink, the bathroom hand-basin and the bath respectively in two of the dwellings. All thermosyphon flow circuits are manufactured from light gauge 22 mm diameter copper to reduce flow resistance. There are no acute pipe bends and all pipe-work is approximately inclined to prevent air locks. A drain facility is provided in the lowest point in the thermosyphon flow circuit. The systems installed also differ in their respective methods of preventing damage due to freezing. In one unit, an electrical heating element taped to the lower header of the collector, heats the water in the collector when the temperature falls below zero. The second system is of the automatic "drain-down" type. The third system contains antifreeze and heats DHW via a heat exchanger.
4 schema:endDate 1987-12-31T00:00:00Z
5 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.270680.b
6 schema:identifier N8bb6b9683ab9467095fc4d6a6008690a
7 Nae3bdd76080e4239880b3bca617141e8
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:keywords Cranfield Institute
10 Europe
11 FROSTPROTECTION
12 GJ
13 July 1986
14 MAXORB
15 TAP
16 THERMAL RESULTS
17 THERMOSYPHON SOLAR ENERGY WATER
18 THREE DWELLINGS
19 acceptable temperature level
20 acute pipe bends
21 additional electric immersion element water-heating
22 additional taps
23 adjacent dwellings
24 air lock
25 annual energy requirements
26 annum
27 antifreeze
28 arrival
29 aspoor
30 average
31 bad weather conditions
32 basin
33 bath
34 bathroom hand-basin
35 boiler
36 bolts
37 cm thick layer
38 coal
39 collector
40 collectors weight
41 considerable time
42 contribution
43 cool water
44 criteria
45 damage
46 detailed economic analysis
47 different componants
48 different families
49 different hot-water consumption patterns
50 different houses
51 different methods
52 different patterns
53 distance
54 domestic hot-water requirement
55 drain
56 drain facility
57 dwellings
58 effect
59 effectiveness
60 efficient installation
61 electric heating system
62 electrical heating elements
63 family
64 fibrous insulant
65 flat-plate solar-energy collector
66 flow resistance
67 following elements
68 freezing
69 frost period
70 glass
71 glycol
72 good thermal isolation
73 groups
74 handling
75 heat exchanger
76 heating system
77 heats DHW
78 high importance
79 high insulation
80 high solar fraction
81 high temperature
82 highest daily solar fractions
83 hot water
84 hot water supply pipe
85 hot-water consumption
86 hot-water production
87 hot-water store
88 house
89 identical thermosyphonic solar-energy water-heating systems
90 independent unpressurized cold-water header tank
91 inhabited houses
92 installation
93 installation experience
94 installation procedure
95 instruction
96 insufficient material delivery
97 interested workmen
98 kg
99 kitchen
100 levels
101 light gauge 22 mm diameter copper
102 liquid
103 liter
104 localities
105 loft
106 long-term solar-energy contribution
107 lower header
108 lowest point
109 mains gas-supply
110 man days
111 married students
112 maximum
113 means
114 mode yields
115 monitoring results
116 months
117 negative user response
118 occupants
119 oil
120 overall efficiency
121 overall solar fraction
122 particular skills
123 payback 48 years
124 payback time
125 pipe-work
126 piping connections
127 plastic collector box
128 point
129 radiator
130 rafters
131 realistic data base
132 reliability
133 remote temperature indication
134 respective methods
135 roof
136 rural areas
137 second system
138 selective coatings
139 short while
140 solar heated water
141 solar installation
142 solar plant
143 solar system
144 solar-heated water
145 substantial reduction
146 such kind
147 supply pipes
148 surface
149 system
150 system performance
151 technology
152 temperature
153 thermosyphon flow circuit
154 thermosyphon solar-energy water heater
155 third system
156 third tap
157 third tap installation
158 tiles
159 time
160 toe/year
161 total energy production
162 total installation
163 total installation time
164 tradespersons
165 type
166 typical domestic hot-water requirements
167 units
168 use
169 user responses
170 users
171 vent
172 water
173 water heating
174 water temperature
175 weather-proofed
176 weeks
177 winter time
178 year monitoring period
179 years
180 schema:name THERMOSYPHON SOLAR ENERGY WATER HEATING FOR A GROUP OF THREE DWELLINGS
181 schema:recipient https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.12026.37
182 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.3711804
183 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T11:20
184 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
185 schema:sdPublisher Nf6967acb142941d48a91e64eae116ca9
186 schema:startDate 1984-07-30T00:00:00Z
187 schema:url http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/18640_en.html
188 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
189 sgo:sdDataset grants
190 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
191 N8bb6b9683ab9467095fc4d6a6008690a schema:name cordis_id
192 schema:value 18640
193 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
194 Nae3bdd76080e4239880b3bca617141e8 schema:name dimensions_id
195 schema:value 3711804
196 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
197 Necb0e3b2ea5d4f8ab4615c86cdc12174 schema:currency EUR
198 schema:value 57759
199 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
200 Nf6967acb142941d48a91e64eae116ca9 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
201 rdf:type schema:Organization
202 anzsrc-for:2209 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
203 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
204 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.12026.37 schema:Organization
205 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.270680.b schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...