Functional Analysis of Biofilms in Premise Plumbing View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2009-2013

FUNDING AMOUNT

169031 USD

ABSTRACT

0854332 He Biofilm in premise plumbing could pose both direct and indirect public health risks by impairing water quality integrity and serving as a reservoir of harmful microorganisms. Practical and effective strategies to minimize biofilm occurrence and reduce public health risks, however, remain to be developed, due to the lack of adequate understanding of the microbial processes underlying biofilm occurrence, particularly in premise plumbing which represents over 85% of the total distribution system but has not received adequate research attention. The research objective of the proposed project is to identify the processes responsible for the survival and adaptation of biofilm microbial communities in premise plumbing. The research will be conducted by using community-level characterization of biofilm functional processes. This research will use a community-level approach combining high-throughput DNA microarray-based functional analysis and 16S rRNA gene-based molecular microbial ecology tools for the characterization of biofilm microbial communities in premise plumbing systems of distinct characteristics. This research will provide much needed insight into fundamental processes controlling biofilm persistence which would enable the development of effective strategies for the minimization of biofilms in premise plumbing by targeting key processes that facilitate biofilm occurrence. Results from this work will also enable improved risk assessment, design guidelines and regulations for premise plumbing by providing much needed data regarding the impact of plumbing material, water use pattern, environmental factors, and water quality characteristics on microbial contamination in premise plumbing. Improved understanding of the microbial processes controlling the development of biofilm in water distribution systems, particularly premise plumbing, will lead to more effective strategies to minimize microbial contamination of drinking water and enhanced safety of drinking water. This will lead further to minimized occurrence of waterborne diseases, increased use of public water supply, and reduced use of additional purification devices and bottled water. Our society will benefit through reduced heath care costs and more sustainable uses of energy and resources. In addition, the proposed research provides an excellent example of the application of genomics and microbiology in environmental engineering. Thus the infusion of research results from the proposed work into classroom teaching will better prepare students for learning and working in the increasingly interdisciplinary filed of environmental engineering. More importantly, the participation of minority students from a local urban high school in the proposed project will ensure that underrepresented students have the educational exposure crucial to their success in learning and working in the engineering profession. More... »

URL

http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=0854332&HistoricalAwards=false

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2206", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "USD", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": "169031"
    }, 
    "description": "0854332 He Biofilm in premise plumbing could pose both direct and indirect public health risks by impairing water quality integrity and serving as a reservoir of harmful microorganisms. Practical and effective strategies to minimize biofilm occurrence and reduce public health risks, however, remain to be developed, due to the lack of adequate understanding of the microbial processes underlying biofilm occurrence, particularly in premise plumbing which represents over 85% of the total distribution system but has not received adequate research attention. The research objective of the proposed project is to identify the processes responsible for the survival and adaptation of biofilm microbial communities in premise plumbing. The research will be conducted by using community-level characterization of biofilm functional processes. This research will use a community-level approach combining high-throughput DNA microarray-based functional analysis and 16S rRNA gene-based molecular microbial ecology tools for the characterization of biofilm microbial communities in premise plumbing systems of distinct characteristics. This research will provide much needed insight into fundamental processes controlling biofilm persistence which would enable the development of effective strategies for the minimization of biofilms in premise plumbing by targeting key processes that facilitate biofilm occurrence. Results from this work will also enable improved risk assessment, design guidelines and regulations for premise plumbing by providing much needed data regarding the impact of plumbing material, water use pattern, environmental factors, and water quality characteristics on microbial contamination in premise plumbing. Improved understanding of the microbial processes controlling the development of biofilm in water distribution systems, particularly premise plumbing, will lead to more effective strategies to minimize microbial contamination of drinking water and enhanced safety of drinking water. This will lead further to minimized occurrence of waterborne diseases, increased use of public water supply, and reduced use of additional purification devices and bottled water. Our society will benefit through reduced heath care costs and more sustainable uses of energy and resources. In addition, the proposed research provides an excellent example of the application of genomics and microbiology in environmental engineering. Thus the infusion of research results from the proposed work into classroom teaching will better prepare students for learning and working in the increasingly interdisciplinary filed of environmental engineering. More importantly, the participation of minority students from a local urban high school in the proposed project will ensure that underrepresented students have the educational exposure crucial to their success in learning and working in the engineering profession.", 
    "endDate": "2013-02-28T00:00:00Z", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.457810.f", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.3097862", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "3097862"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nsf_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "0854332"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "public health risk", 
      "more effective strategies", 
      "enhanced safety", 
      "adaptation", 
      "underrepresented students", 
      "occurrence", 
      "reservoir", 
      "use", 
      "rRNA gene", 
      "data", 
      "genomics", 
      "excellent example", 
      "society", 
      "high-throughput DNA microarrays", 
      "total distribution system", 
      "community-level characterization", 
      "public water supply", 
      "water distribution systems", 
      "key processes", 
      "regulation", 
      "adequate research attention", 
      "energy", 
      "indirect public health risks", 
      "biofilm microbial communities", 
      "improved understanding", 
      "Environmental Engineering", 
      "harmful microorganisms", 
      "students", 
      "minority students", 
      "additional purification devices", 
      "minimization", 
      "plumbing materials", 
      "participation", 
      "drinking water", 
      "heath care costs", 
      "sustainable uses", 
      "addition", 
      "engineering profession", 
      "premise plumbing systems", 
      "functional analysis", 
      "development", 
      "research", 
      "environmental factors", 
      "water quality integrity", 
      "classroom teaching", 
      "molecular microbial ecology tools", 
      "biofilm", 
      "application", 
      "fundamental processes", 
      "research objectives", 
      "distinct characteristics", 
      "community-level approach", 
      "improved risk assessment", 
      "educational exposure", 
      "biofilms", 
      "design guidelines", 
      "infusion", 
      "microbial processes", 
      "water quality characteristics", 
      "microbial contamination", 
      "survival", 
      "work", 
      "effective strategy", 
      "biofilm persistence", 
      "characterization", 
      "insight", 
      "premise plumbing", 
      "results", 
      "success", 
      "microbiology", 
      "waterborne diseases", 
      "resources", 
      "water use patterns", 
      "project", 
      "impact", 
      "process", 
      "functional processes", 
      "biofilm occurrence", 
      "bottled water", 
      "adequate understanding", 
      "lack", 
      "local urban high school", 
      "research results"
    ], 
    "name": "Functional Analysis of Biofilms in Premise Plumbing", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411461.7", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411461.7", 
          "name": "University of Tennessee Knoxville", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "He", 
        "givenName": "Qiang", 
        "id": "sg:person.01263541603.07", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.01263541603.07", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.3097862"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T12:33", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/nsf_projects_3.xml.gz", 
    "startDate": "2009-05-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=0854332&HistoricalAwards=false"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3097862'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3097862'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3097862'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.3097862'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

127 TRIPLES      19 PREDICATES      105 URIs      97 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.3097862 schema:about anzsrc-for:2206
2 schema:amount Nc7b3b71b99d14e12ac0199e541e5dc61
3 schema:description 0854332 He Biofilm in premise plumbing could pose both direct and indirect public health risks by impairing water quality integrity and serving as a reservoir of harmful microorganisms. Practical and effective strategies to minimize biofilm occurrence and reduce public health risks, however, remain to be developed, due to the lack of adequate understanding of the microbial processes underlying biofilm occurrence, particularly in premise plumbing which represents over 85% of the total distribution system but has not received adequate research attention. The research objective of the proposed project is to identify the processes responsible for the survival and adaptation of biofilm microbial communities in premise plumbing. The research will be conducted by using community-level characterization of biofilm functional processes. This research will use a community-level approach combining high-throughput DNA microarray-based functional analysis and 16S rRNA gene-based molecular microbial ecology tools for the characterization of biofilm microbial communities in premise plumbing systems of distinct characteristics. This research will provide much needed insight into fundamental processes controlling biofilm persistence which would enable the development of effective strategies for the minimization of biofilms in premise plumbing by targeting key processes that facilitate biofilm occurrence. Results from this work will also enable improved risk assessment, design guidelines and regulations for premise plumbing by providing much needed data regarding the impact of plumbing material, water use pattern, environmental factors, and water quality characteristics on microbial contamination in premise plumbing. Improved understanding of the microbial processes controlling the development of biofilm in water distribution systems, particularly premise plumbing, will lead to more effective strategies to minimize microbial contamination of drinking water and enhanced safety of drinking water. This will lead further to minimized occurrence of waterborne diseases, increased use of public water supply, and reduced use of additional purification devices and bottled water. Our society will benefit through reduced heath care costs and more sustainable uses of energy and resources. In addition, the proposed research provides an excellent example of the application of genomics and microbiology in environmental engineering. Thus the infusion of research results from the proposed work into classroom teaching will better prepare students for learning and working in the increasingly interdisciplinary filed of environmental engineering. More importantly, the participation of minority students from a local urban high school in the proposed project will ensure that underrepresented students have the educational exposure crucial to their success in learning and working in the engineering profession.
4 schema:endDate 2013-02-28T00:00:00Z
5 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.457810.f
6 schema:identifier N4201e805859d417495c5fc7f5355030b
7 N4a92ef89fa6e4e8b90f784e017157397
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:keywords Environmental Engineering
10 adaptation
11 addition
12 additional purification devices
13 adequate research attention
14 adequate understanding
15 application
16 biofilm
17 biofilm microbial communities
18 biofilm occurrence
19 biofilm persistence
20 biofilms
21 bottled water
22 characterization
23 classroom teaching
24 community-level approach
25 community-level characterization
26 data
27 design guidelines
28 development
29 distinct characteristics
30 drinking water
31 educational exposure
32 effective strategy
33 energy
34 engineering profession
35 enhanced safety
36 environmental factors
37 excellent example
38 functional analysis
39 functional processes
40 fundamental processes
41 genomics
42 harmful microorganisms
43 heath care costs
44 high-throughput DNA microarrays
45 impact
46 improved risk assessment
47 improved understanding
48 indirect public health risks
49 infusion
50 insight
51 key processes
52 lack
53 local urban high school
54 microbial contamination
55 microbial processes
56 microbiology
57 minimization
58 minority students
59 molecular microbial ecology tools
60 more effective strategies
61 occurrence
62 participation
63 plumbing materials
64 premise plumbing
65 premise plumbing systems
66 process
67 project
68 public health risk
69 public water supply
70 rRNA gene
71 regulation
72 research
73 research objectives
74 research results
75 reservoir
76 resources
77 results
78 society
79 students
80 success
81 survival
82 sustainable uses
83 total distribution system
84 underrepresented students
85 use
86 water distribution systems
87 water quality characteristics
88 water quality integrity
89 water use patterns
90 waterborne diseases
91 work
92 schema:name Functional Analysis of Biofilms in Premise Plumbing
93 schema:recipient Ncc42d5a275da4707a5f2fcf58d0a5ab8
94 sg:person.01263541603.07
95 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411461.7
96 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.3097862
97 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T12:33
98 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
99 schema:sdPublisher N2b69170383f746e58d8fc60520b63604
100 schema:startDate 2009-05-01T00:00:00Z
101 schema:url http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=0854332&HistoricalAwards=false
102 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
103 sgo:sdDataset grants
104 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
105 N2b69170383f746e58d8fc60520b63604 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
106 rdf:type schema:Organization
107 N4201e805859d417495c5fc7f5355030b schema:name dimensions_id
108 schema:value 3097862
109 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
110 N4a92ef89fa6e4e8b90f784e017157397 schema:name nsf_id
111 schema:value 0854332
112 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
113 Nc7b3b71b99d14e12ac0199e541e5dc61 schema:currency USD
114 schema:value 169031
115 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
116 Ncc42d5a275da4707a5f2fcf58d0a5ab8 schema:member sg:person.01263541603.07
117 schema:roleName PI
118 rdf:type schema:Role
119 anzsrc-for:2206 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
120 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
121 sg:person.01263541603.07 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411461.7
122 schema:familyName He
123 schema:givenName Qiang
124 rdf:type schema:Person
125 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411461.7 schema:name University of Tennessee Knoxville
126 rdf:type schema:Organization
127 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.457810.f schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...