Discovery of Matter Anti-matter Asymmerty in the Charm Sector View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2012-2017

FUNDING AMOUNT

424205 GBP

ABSTRACT

Symmetries play an essential role in our understanding of the universe. Nature exhibits a stunning level of symmetry across all scales, from the bilateral symmetry of many animal's bodies to the mathematical symmetry of the fundamental physical laws. But only the imperfections of symmetries reveal the full picture. In astrophysics for example, the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation has given insight into the structure of the universe roughly 300,000 years after the big bang. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) we study the type of physics which governed the processes just a fraction of a second after the big bang. The LHC, located 100m underground just outside Geneva, collides protons at energies that have never previously been reached in a laboratory on earth. The smallest of the four large experiments at the LHC is known as LHCb, and is specifically designed to discover asymmetries in the behaviour of matter and antimatter. In our current understanding, matter consists of twelve fundamental particles: the six quarks (u, d, s, c, b, t ordered by increasing mass), and an electron with its heavier partners muon and tau and their three associated neutrinos. These interact by the exchange of so-called bosons, which are fundamental force carrying particles. The standard model of particle physics (SM) explains these matter interactions and has so far held up to all experimental tests. However, it fails to give explanations to basic questions like the reason why the t-quark is over 50,000 times heavier than the u-quark. Another is the puzzle that perfect symmetry would lead to equal amounts of matter and antimatter and the annihilation of the universe shortly after the big-bang. Questions like these tell us that the SM does not cover all aspects of fundamental interactions and therefore has to be extended. Nature has given us three special laboratories to study matter and antimatter interaction: neutral mesons (called K, B and D-meson), particles consisting of one quark (matter) and one antiquark (antimatter). These mesons periodically change into their antiparticle and back, a process called mixing. The studies of two of these systems (K and B mesons) have led to Nobel-prize winning breakthroughs. I will study the mixing phenomenon in the third system, known as the D-meson system. Particularly, I will be looking for a tiny asymmetry in this process, an asymmetry between the behaviour of matter and antimatter. Such an asymmetry has been observed in the K and B-meson systems but remains to be detected in D-mesons. The LHCb experiment is the best apparatus for measuring D-mesons for at least the next decade. The asymmetry in D-mesons I am looking for is predicted to be tiny in the SM. The precision we can achieve allows the observation of this effect if it is enhanced beyond the SM level. Detailed analyses of several processes involving D-mesons cannot only give evidence for new physics phenomena but also allow to identify the type of new physics by comparison with existing models. Particle physics research continues to lead to technological benefits to society, from the World Wide Web to medical imaging, but its true purpose will always be the search for fundamental understanding of our universe. My goal is to further this understanding, using the matter-antimatter asymmetry to reveal nature's beauty. And true beauty lies in imperfections. More... »

URL

http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk/project/6349F8F4-41B4-4753-B020-0F9AE510F25C

Related SciGraph Publications

  • 2018-02. Measurement of branching fractions of charmless four-body Λb0 and Ξb0 decays in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2018-01. First observation of B+ → Ds+K+K− decays and a search for B+ → Ds+ϕ decays in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2018-01. Search for excited Bc+ states in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-12. Bose-Einstein correlations of same-sign charged pions in the forward region in pp collisions at s=7 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-12. Averages of b-hadron, c-hadron, and τ-lepton properties as of summer 2016 in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2017-12. Measurement of the B± production cross-section in pp collisions at s=7 and 13 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-12. Measurement of the Y(nS) polarizations in pp collisions at s=7 and 8 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-12. Updated search for long-lived particles decaying to jet pairs in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2017-11. Study of bb¯ correlations in high energy proton-proton collisions in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-11. Updated branching fraction measurements of B( s)0 → KS0h+h′ − decays in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-11. Measurement of CP observables in B± → DK*± decays using two- and four-body D final states in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-11. Measurement of CP violation in B0 → J/ψKS0 and B0 → ψ(2S)KS0 decays in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-10. Study of prompt D0 meson production in pPb collisions at sNN=5 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-10. Improved limit on the branching fraction of the rare decay KS0→μ+μ- in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2017-10. Erratum to: Measurement of the J/ψ pair production cross-section in pp collisions at s=13 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-09. Study of charmonium production in b-hadron decays and first evidence for the decay Bs0→ϕϕϕ in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2017-08. Test of lepton universality with B0 → K*0ℓ+ℓ− decays in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-08. Resonances and CP violation in Bs0 and B¯s0→J/ψK+K− decays in the mass region above the ϕ(1020) in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-07. Observation of the decay Bs0 → ηcϕ and evidence for Bs0 → ηcπ+π− in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-06. Observation of the decay Λb0 → pK−μ+μ− and a search for CP violation in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-06. Measurement of the J/ψ pair production cross-section in pp collisions at s=13 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-06. Measurements of prompt charm production cross-sections in pp collisions at s=5 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-05. Erratum to: Measurement of forward J/ψ production cross-sections in pp collisions at s=13 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-05. Study of the D0p amplitude in Λb0 → D0pπ− decays in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-05. Search for the Bs0 → η′ϕ decay in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-04. Evidence for the two-body charmless baryonic decay B+→pΛ¯ in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-04. New algorithms for identifying the flavour of B0 mesons using pions and protons in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2017-04. Observation of the suppressed decay Λb0 → pπ−μ+μ− in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-04. Erratum to: Measurements of the S-wave fraction in B0 → K+π−μ+μ− decays and the B0 → K∗(892)0μ+μ− differential branching fraction in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-04. Search for massive long-lived particles decaying semileptonically in the LHCb detector in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2017-03. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions and difference in CP asymmetries of the decays B+ → J/ψπ+ and B+ → J/ψK+ in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-03. Search for decays of neutral beauty mesons into four muons in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2017-03. Measurement of the phase difference between short- and long-distance amplitudes in the B+→K+μ+μ- decay in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2017-02. Observation of B+→J/ψ3π+2π- and B+→ψ(2S)π+π+π- decays in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2016-12. Search for Higgs-like bosons decaying into long-lived exotic particles in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2016-12. Measurement of the CKM angle γ from a combination of LHCb results in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-12. Differential branching fraction and angular moments analysis of the decay B0 → K+π−μ+μ− in the K0,2∗(1430)0 region in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-11. Measurements of the S-wave fraction in B0 → K+π−μ+μ− decays and the B0 → K∗(892)0μ+μ− differential branching fraction in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-10. Measurement of forward W → eν production in pp collisions at s=8 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-09. Erratum to: Measurements of prompt charm production cross-sections in pp collisions at s=13 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-09. Measurement of the forward Z boson production cross-section in pp collisions at s=13 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-09. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions ℬBc+→J/ψK+/ℬBc+→J/ψπ+ in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-08. Measurement of the CKM angle γ using B0 → DK*0 with D → KS0π+π− decays in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-07. Production of associated Y and open charm hadrons in pp collisions at s=7 and 8 TeV via double parton scattering in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-07. A precise measurement of the B0 meson oscillation frequency in THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C
  • 2016-06. Model-independent measurement of the CKM angle γ using B0 → DK∗0 decays with D → KS0π+π− and KS0K+K− in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-05. Measurement of forward W and Z boson production in association with jets in proton-proton collisions at s=8 TeV in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-05. Observations of Λb0 → ΛK+π− and Λb0 → ΛK+K− decays and searches for other Λb0 and Ξb0 decays to Λh+h′− final states in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-05. Measurement of the properties of the Ξb∗ 0 baryon in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
  • 2016-05. Observation of Λb0 → ψ(2S)pK− and Λb0 → J/ψπ+π−pK− decays and a measurement of the Λb0 baryon mass in JOURNAL OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS
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