MRC Centre for Transplantation View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2012-2018

FUNDING AMOUNT

2042049 GBP

ABSTRACT

Organ transplantation has saved the lives of many thousands of people, but transplants still don't last as long as they should. In addition, to prevent rejection, high doses of toxic drugs are used to dampen the immune response. These can not only harm the transplant, but can have lethal side effects on the recipient. Since it started in October 2007, the Centre has made significant progress towards improving the health of people who need transplants. We have devised ways to make their transplanted organ survive longer. This includes the development of engineered proteins which, when planted in donor kidneys, reduce inflammation and blood clot formation after transplantation. In addition, we have pioneered less harmful, more natural methods to coax the immune system into accepting the transplant, using cells taken from the patient. Remarkably, as a result of monitoring the immune system, we are close to being able to judge which patients can stop taking conventional therapy without rejecting the graft. At the same time, we are developing advanced scanning techniques that will enable physicians to diagnose whether a transplant is inflamed and to offer appropriate treatment. As we approach the next five years of development, we shall conduct clinical trials to establish whether these innovations can benefit healthcare as the basic research has promised. Potential benefits include extending the life of the transplant and offering transplantation to more of those in need. We are also supporting new branches of science that make success more likely. Advances of this complexity are made possible by bringing together a large workforce of scientists, clinicians and technologists under the same roof. The MRC Centre for Transplantation has created this capability within the UK. It collaborates with the Centre for Medical Law and Ethics at King's College to ensure a high standard of communication and public engagement regarding the regulation and ethics of transplant research. A programme of special events and media coverage will help keep the public and patients informed during innovation. Health economists are also to be part of the Centre to provide the opportunity to make more accurate forecasts about the costs and potential benefits of our research. Future success will depend on recruiting and training the brightest minds to deliver this work through the next 5-10 years of development and ensure the research is translated into social and economic benefit. Technical Summary In 2007, the Centre set out to convert its extensive knowledge of inflammation, immunity and tolerance into new treatment, diagnostic and prognostic technologies for the benefit of patients. Our priorities were to overcome the initial barriers to transplantation presented by the immune system and to induce tolerance in patients with guidance from immune prediction and monitoring, so reducing some of the major limitations of modern transplantation. To do this, we created links with protein and cell therapeutics, imaging sciences and genetics, and between clinical specialities responsible for the treatment of patients with diabetes, liver, kidney, bone marrow and dental diseases. As a result, the first membrane-targeted therapeutic regulators are about to enter a multicentre efficacy trial; the cell therapy strategy has progressed to become part of several investigational protocols designed to induce tolerance; markers of tolerance are undergoing extensive evaluation in man; and new imaging ligands that detect activated complement fragments and migratory T cells have emerged. A teaching framework built around these goals is equipping trainees to engage in multidisciplinary research. A programme of patient and public involvement promotes awareness of the importance of science in transplant medicine and ensures we are responsive to their expectations. Our plan is to regroup the expanded number of basic and clinical research programmes into fewer themes which reflect areas of strategic value. This includes islet and hepatocyte transplantation, where inadequate long-term outcomes are likely to benefit from the specific expertise of the Centre. In support, an expanded training scheme will develop leadership skills in the distinct areas defined by the new themes, i.e. protein and cell engineering, immune monitoring, imaging and informatics. A parallel theme to improve methods of health economic assessment for early research is designed to support these goals. More... »

URL

http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk/project/5C9020B5-5161-48B8-BD61-E87E2A3C904C

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