Lexical Segmentation And Access In Aphasia View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

1998-2005

FUNDING AMOUNT

353556 USD

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (Adapted from the Investigator's Abstract): The long-term goal of this project is to examine lexical segmentation in aphasia, and to use the resulting data to help understand how humans accomplish the difficult task of recognizing individual words in connected speech. The strategy behind the research is to identify patients with specific impairments in targeted aspects of language processing including lexical access, and the discrimination of putative acoustic-phonetic word boundary cues, and examine how they interpret speech sequences known as oronyms in which positing different word boundaries leads to recognizing different words (e.g., kidnap/kid nap). It will address four issues: (1) whether lexical segmentation is the results of a discrete process, or a byproduct of lexical access, (2) how the acoustic form of word onsets affects lexical segmentation, (3) what the timecourse of segmentation disambiguation is, and (4) what factors modulate interword competition in lexical access and/or segmentation. These issues will be examined through a series of offline discrimination tasks and online paradigms including cross-modal lexical priming and word monitoring that provide implicit measures of aphasic and unimpaired listeners' interpretation of oronyms. This research will provide both individual and group studies of lexical access and segmentation and their impairment. At present there are no published studies examining lexical segmentation in aphasia. As segmentation is one of the central problems of spoken word recognition in connected speech processing, this work addresses a critical gap in our understanding of aphasic disturbances of spoken language comprehension. In addition to characterizing the nature of segmentation processes in aphasia, this work will provide a new source of converging evidence to understand the organization of spoken word recognition processes in normal listeners. It is expected that the understanding gained will ultimately be useful to clinicians, therapists and theorists. More... »

URL

http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6497126

Related SciGraph Publications

  • 2003-05. Feature parsing: Feature cue mapping in spoken word recognition in ATTENTION, PERCEPTION, & PSYCHOPHYSICS
  • JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

    TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

    [
      {
        "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
        "about": [
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2220", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2217", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2217", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }
        ], 
        "amount": {
          "currency": "USD", 
          "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
          "value": "353556"
        }, 
        "description": "DESCRIPTION (Adapted from the Investigator's Abstract): The long-term goal of this project is to examine lexical segmentation in aphasia, and to use the resulting data to help understand how humans accomplish the difficult task of recognizing individual words in connected speech. The strategy behind the research is to identify patients with specific impairments in targeted aspects of language processing including lexical access, and the discrimination of putative acoustic-phonetic word boundary cues, and examine how they interpret speech sequences known as oronyms in which positing different word boundaries leads to recognizing different words (e.g., kidnap/kid nap). It will address four issues: (1) whether lexical segmentation is the results of a discrete process, or a byproduct of lexical access, (2) how the acoustic form of word onsets affects lexical segmentation, (3) what the timecourse of segmentation disambiguation is, and (4) what factors modulate interword competition in lexical access and/or segmentation. These issues will be examined through a series of offline discrimination tasks and online paradigms including cross-modal lexical priming and word monitoring that provide implicit measures of aphasic and unimpaired listeners' interpretation of oronyms. This research will provide both individual and group studies of lexical access and segmentation and their impairment. At present there are no published studies examining lexical segmentation in aphasia. As segmentation is one of the central problems of spoken word recognition in connected speech processing, this work addresses a critical gap in our understanding of aphasic disturbances of spoken language comprehension. In addition to characterizing the nature of segmentation processes in aphasia, this work will provide a new source of converging evidence to understand the organization of spoken word recognition processes in normal listeners. It is expected that the understanding gained will ultimately be useful to clinicians, therapists and theorists.", 
        "endDate": "2005-01-31T00:00:00Z", 
        "funder": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.214431.1", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "id": "sg:grant.2627178", 
        "identifier": [
          {
            "name": "dimensions_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "2627178"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "nih_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "R29DC003108"
            ]
          }
        ], 
        "inLanguage": [
          "en"
        ], 
        "keywords": [
          "segmentation disambiguation", 
          "humans", 
          "present", 
          "putative acoustic-phonetic word boundary cues", 
          "speech", 
          "byproduct", 
          "impairment", 
          "long-term goal", 
          "segmentation process", 
          "implicit measures", 
          "connected speech processing", 
          "word onset", 
          "different words", 
          "addition", 
          "critical gap", 
          "specific impairment", 
          "strategies", 
          "description", 
          "lexical priming", 
          "series", 
          "individual words", 
          "language comprehension", 
          "normal listeners", 
          "Investigator's Abstract", 
          "research", 
          "speech sequences", 
          "issues", 
          "spoken word recognition", 
          "different word boundaries", 
          "aphasic disturbances", 
          "cross-modal", 
          "aphasics", 
          "online paradigms", 
          "aspects", 
          "offline discrimination tasks", 
          "understanding", 
          "word monitoring", 
          "difficult task", 
          "acoustic form", 
          "new source", 
          "language processing", 
          "group studies", 
          "theorists", 
          "results", 
          "lexical segmentation", 
          "work", 
          "data", 
          "clinicians", 
          "therapists", 
          "access", 
          "timecourse", 
          "word recognition", 
          "discrete processes", 
          "aphasia", 
          "central problem", 
          "project", 
          "patients", 
          "interword competition", 
          "segmentation", 
          "organization", 
          "factors", 
          "discrimination", 
          "nature", 
          "unimpaired listeners' interpretation", 
          "lexical access", 
          "oronyms", 
          "kid nap", 
          "evidence", 
          "study"
        ], 
        "name": "LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND ACCESS IN APHASIA", 
        "recipient": [
          {
            "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35", 
            "type": "Organization"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35", 
              "name": "MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL", 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "GOW", 
            "givenName": "DAVID W", 
            "id": "sg:person.0643643143.30", 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "member": "sg:person.0643643143.30", 
            "roleName": "PI", 
            "type": "Role"
          }
        ], 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2627178"
        ], 
        "sdDataset": "grants", 
        "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T12:04", 
        "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
        "sdPublisher": {
          "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/nih_projects_16.xml.gz", 
        "startDate": "1998-02-01T00:00:00Z", 
        "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
        "url": "http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6497126"
      }
    ]
     

    Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2627178'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2627178'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2627178'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2627178'


     

    This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

    116 TRIPLES      19 PREDICATES      92 URIs      83 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 sg:grant.2627178 schema:about anzsrc-for:2217
    2 anzsrc-for:2220
    3 schema:amount Nf392e77efd0a44988e5d2de34e30d3a2
    4 schema:description DESCRIPTION (Adapted from the Investigator's Abstract): The long-term goal of this project is to examine lexical segmentation in aphasia, and to use the resulting data to help understand how humans accomplish the difficult task of recognizing individual words in connected speech. The strategy behind the research is to identify patients with specific impairments in targeted aspects of language processing including lexical access, and the discrimination of putative acoustic-phonetic word boundary cues, and examine how they interpret speech sequences known as oronyms in which positing different word boundaries leads to recognizing different words (e.g., kidnap/kid nap). It will address four issues: (1) whether lexical segmentation is the results of a discrete process, or a byproduct of lexical access, (2) how the acoustic form of word onsets affects lexical segmentation, (3) what the timecourse of segmentation disambiguation is, and (4) what factors modulate interword competition in lexical access and/or segmentation. These issues will be examined through a series of offline discrimination tasks and online paradigms including cross-modal lexical priming and word monitoring that provide implicit measures of aphasic and unimpaired listeners' interpretation of oronyms. This research will provide both individual and group studies of lexical access and segmentation and their impairment. At present there are no published studies examining lexical segmentation in aphasia. As segmentation is one of the central problems of spoken word recognition in connected speech processing, this work addresses a critical gap in our understanding of aphasic disturbances of spoken language comprehension. In addition to characterizing the nature of segmentation processes in aphasia, this work will provide a new source of converging evidence to understand the organization of spoken word recognition processes in normal listeners. It is expected that the understanding gained will ultimately be useful to clinicians, therapists and theorists.
    5 schema:endDate 2005-01-31T00:00:00Z
    6 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.214431.1
    7 schema:identifier N5941499fd5e543f2a4c0e01cf638ad9c
    8 Ne1dff6edf3f24b08bb9df58dde970a85
    9 schema:inLanguage en
    10 schema:keywords Investigator's Abstract
    11 access
    12 acoustic form
    13 addition
    14 aphasia
    15 aphasic disturbances
    16 aphasics
    17 aspects
    18 byproduct
    19 central problem
    20 clinicians
    21 connected speech processing
    22 critical gap
    23 cross-modal
    24 data
    25 description
    26 different word boundaries
    27 different words
    28 difficult task
    29 discrete processes
    30 discrimination
    31 evidence
    32 factors
    33 group studies
    34 humans
    35 impairment
    36 implicit measures
    37 individual words
    38 interword competition
    39 issues
    40 kid nap
    41 language comprehension
    42 language processing
    43 lexical access
    44 lexical priming
    45 lexical segmentation
    46 long-term goal
    47 nature
    48 new source
    49 normal listeners
    50 offline discrimination tasks
    51 online paradigms
    52 organization
    53 oronyms
    54 patients
    55 present
    56 project
    57 putative acoustic-phonetic word boundary cues
    58 research
    59 results
    60 segmentation
    61 segmentation disambiguation
    62 segmentation process
    63 series
    64 specific impairment
    65 speech
    66 speech sequences
    67 spoken word recognition
    68 strategies
    69 study
    70 theorists
    71 therapists
    72 timecourse
    73 understanding
    74 unimpaired listeners' interpretation
    75 word monitoring
    76 word onset
    77 word recognition
    78 work
    79 schema:name LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND ACCESS IN APHASIA
    80 schema:recipient N5734b15435f0411ab9b1b56cb7e53373
    81 sg:person.0643643143.30
    82 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35
    83 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2627178
    84 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T12:04
    85 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    86 schema:sdPublisher N2796ab126fb94b06a72b775228964dd6
    87 schema:startDate 1998-02-01T00:00:00Z
    88 schema:url http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6497126
    89 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
    90 sgo:sdDataset grants
    91 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
    92 N2796ab126fb94b06a72b775228964dd6 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
    93 rdf:type schema:Organization
    94 N5734b15435f0411ab9b1b56cb7e53373 schema:member sg:person.0643643143.30
    95 schema:roleName PI
    96 rdf:type schema:Role
    97 N5941499fd5e543f2a4c0e01cf638ad9c schema:name nih_id
    98 schema:value R29DC003108
    99 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    100 Ne1dff6edf3f24b08bb9df58dde970a85 schema:name dimensions_id
    101 schema:value 2627178
    102 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    103 Nf392e77efd0a44988e5d2de34e30d3a2 schema:currency USD
    104 schema:value 353556
    105 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
    106 anzsrc-for:2217 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    107 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    108 anzsrc-for:2220 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    109 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    110 sg:person.0643643143.30 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35
    111 schema:familyName GOW
    112 schema:givenName DAVID W
    113 rdf:type schema:Person
    114 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.214431.1 schema:Organization
    115 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.32224.35 schema:name MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL
    116 rdf:type schema:Organization
     




    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...