Isolation and characterization of new adult stem cells from sweat glands. View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2011-2014

FUNDING AMOUNT

239075 USD

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Adult stem cells appear to be remarkably flexible in their ability to reconstitute different tissue lineages raising great interest in assessing the therapeutic potential of those stem cells. For example in skin in vivo both inter-follicular epidermis and hair follicle stem cells can actively participate in wound-healing. Even though hair follicle stem cells are one of the best-characterized adult stem cells system still very little is known about the other stem cells in different skin appendages like sweat glands. It is very likely that these separate skin appendages have their own stem cells which probably could share common molecular features to maintain their stem cells characteristics as well as they presumably are regulated by distinct environmental signals which control their local specification or fate. Thus the main aspect of the proposed research is to test the hypothesis if in adult skin alternative stem cells exist in the areas where hair follicle stem cells are missing. Therefore we will utilize the H2B-GFP system for in vivo detection of infrequently dividing cells to check whether there are different skin stem cells which reside outside of hair follicle niche. This system will allow us not only to localize and isolate those cells but as well for the first time characterize the live stem cells from sweat glands and compare common and unique features of these stem cells to the well- characterized hair follicle stem cells. The comparison between different adult skin stem cells might be highly instructive to study the mechanisms that underlie stem cells niche homeostasis. These data would be also very helpful to understand how different microenvironmental signals in the niche determine the mechanism of stem cell plasticity or tissue-specific regeneration. In long term this knowledge would be useful to translate these basic discoveries to novel form of stem cell therapy with application in human for example in regenerative skin healing and different genetic skin disorders. Overall goal is to understand very basic processes that are important for different skin stem cell niches regulation. More... »

URL

http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8454545

Related SciGraph Publications

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2206", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2206", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "USD", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": "239075"
    }, 
    "description": "DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Adult stem cells appear to be remarkably flexible in their ability to reconstitute different tissue lineages raising great interest in assessing the therapeutic potential of those stem cells. For example in skin in vivo both inter-follicular epidermis and hair follicle stem cells can actively participate in wound-healing. Even though hair follicle stem cells are one of the best-characterized adult stem cells system still very little is known about the other stem cells in different skin appendages like sweat glands. It is very likely that these separate skin appendages have their own stem cells which probably could share common molecular features to maintain their stem cells characteristics as well as they presumably are regulated by distinct environmental signals which control their local specification or fate. Thus the main aspect of the proposed research is to test the hypothesis if in adult skin alternative stem cells exist in the areas where hair follicle stem cells are missing. Therefore we will utilize the H2B-GFP system for in vivo detection of infrequently dividing cells to check whether there are different skin stem cells which reside outside of hair follicle niche. This system will allow us not only to localize and isolate those cells but as well for the first time characterize the live stem cells from sweat glands and compare common and unique features of these stem cells to the well- characterized hair follicle stem cells. The comparison between different adult skin stem cells might be highly instructive to study the mechanisms that underlie stem cells niche homeostasis. These data would be also very helpful to understand how different microenvironmental signals in the niche determine the mechanism of stem cell plasticity or tissue-specific regeneration. In long term this knowledge would be useful to translate these basic discoveries to novel form of stem cell therapy with application in human for example in regenerative skin healing and different genetic skin disorders. Overall goal is to understand very basic processes that are important for different skin stem cell niches regulation.", 
    "endDate": "2014-03-31T00:00:00Z", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420086.8", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.2567913", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "2567913"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nih_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "R03AR061028"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "vivo detection", 
      "description", 
      "applicants", 
      "research", 
      "overall goal", 
      "adult stem cell systems", 
      "local specifications", 
      "knowledge", 
      "H2B-GFP system", 
      "adult stem cells", 
      "basic processes", 
      "skin", 
      "ability", 
      "stem cell niche homeostasis", 
      "cells", 
      "different microenvironmental signals", 
      "therapeutic potential", 
      "hypothesis", 
      "main aspects", 
      "area", 
      "stem cell therapy", 
      "long term", 
      "different skin stem cell niches regulation", 
      "unique features", 
      "wound-healing", 
      "adult skin", 
      "example", 
      "inter-follicular epidermis", 
      "data", 
      "characterization", 
      "mechanism", 
      "hair follicle stem cells", 
      "hair follicle niche", 
      "well-", 
      "fate", 
      "own stem cells", 
      "vivo", 
      "great interest", 
      "separate skin appendages", 
      "common molecular features", 
      "first time", 
      "distinct environmental signals", 
      "regenerative skin healing", 
      "system", 
      "stem cell characteristics", 
      "different skin appendages", 
      "live stem cells", 
      "basic discoveries", 
      "different genetic skin disorders", 
      "niche", 
      "sweat glands", 
      "alternative stem cell", 
      "other stem cells", 
      "humans", 
      "tissue-specific regeneration", 
      "stem cells", 
      "stem cell plasticity", 
      "new adult stem cells", 
      "different tissue lineages", 
      "different adult skin stem cells", 
      "form", 
      "application", 
      "different skin stem cells", 
      "comparison", 
      "isolation"
    ], 
    "name": "Isolation and characterization of new adult stem cells from sweat glands.", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.42505.36", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.42505.36", 
          "name": "UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "KOBIELAK", 
        "givenName": "KRZYSZTOF", 
        "id": "sg:person.01135067473.08", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.01135067473.08", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2567913"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T12:01", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/nih_projects_12.xml.gz", 
    "startDate": "2011-04-15T00:00:00Z", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8454545"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2567913'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2567913'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2567913'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2567913'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

109 TRIPLES      19 PREDICATES      87 URIs      79 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.2567913 schema:about anzsrc-for:2206
2 schema:amount N8e0d54c3e98741a1b5f91b01e6d73b4f
3 schema:description DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Adult stem cells appear to be remarkably flexible in their ability to reconstitute different tissue lineages raising great interest in assessing the therapeutic potential of those stem cells. For example in skin in vivo both inter-follicular epidermis and hair follicle stem cells can actively participate in wound-healing. Even though hair follicle stem cells are one of the best-characterized adult stem cells system still very little is known about the other stem cells in different skin appendages like sweat glands. It is very likely that these separate skin appendages have their own stem cells which probably could share common molecular features to maintain their stem cells characteristics as well as they presumably are regulated by distinct environmental signals which control their local specification or fate. Thus the main aspect of the proposed research is to test the hypothesis if in adult skin alternative stem cells exist in the areas where hair follicle stem cells are missing. Therefore we will utilize the H2B-GFP system for in vivo detection of infrequently dividing cells to check whether there are different skin stem cells which reside outside of hair follicle niche. This system will allow us not only to localize and isolate those cells but as well for the first time characterize the live stem cells from sweat glands and compare common and unique features of these stem cells to the well- characterized hair follicle stem cells. The comparison between different adult skin stem cells might be highly instructive to study the mechanisms that underlie stem cells niche homeostasis. These data would be also very helpful to understand how different microenvironmental signals in the niche determine the mechanism of stem cell plasticity or tissue-specific regeneration. In long term this knowledge would be useful to translate these basic discoveries to novel form of stem cell therapy with application in human for example in regenerative skin healing and different genetic skin disorders. Overall goal is to understand very basic processes that are important for different skin stem cell niches regulation.
4 schema:endDate 2014-03-31T00:00:00Z
5 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420086.8
6 schema:identifier N73b4761a2a3f4ada8fb4e33ac37d5bc6
7 Nbf5adfa8fbf64985a960f931e9681ab5
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:keywords H2B-GFP system
10 ability
11 adult skin
12 adult stem cell systems
13 adult stem cells
14 alternative stem cell
15 applicants
16 application
17 area
18 basic discoveries
19 basic processes
20 cells
21 characterization
22 common molecular features
23 comparison
24 data
25 description
26 different adult skin stem cells
27 different genetic skin disorders
28 different microenvironmental signals
29 different skin appendages
30 different skin stem cell niches regulation
31 different skin stem cells
32 different tissue lineages
33 distinct environmental signals
34 example
35 fate
36 first time
37 form
38 great interest
39 hair follicle niche
40 hair follicle stem cells
41 humans
42 hypothesis
43 inter-follicular epidermis
44 isolation
45 knowledge
46 live stem cells
47 local specifications
48 long term
49 main aspects
50 mechanism
51 new adult stem cells
52 niche
53 other stem cells
54 overall goal
55 own stem cells
56 regenerative skin healing
57 research
58 separate skin appendages
59 skin
60 stem cell characteristics
61 stem cell niche homeostasis
62 stem cell plasticity
63 stem cell therapy
64 stem cells
65 sweat glands
66 system
67 therapeutic potential
68 tissue-specific regeneration
69 unique features
70 vivo
71 vivo detection
72 well-
73 wound-healing
74 schema:name Isolation and characterization of new adult stem cells from sweat glands.
75 schema:recipient N0c3d3dc1cf81408690fdbacd7fc33b2b
76 sg:person.01135067473.08
77 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.42505.36
78 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2567913
79 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T12:01
80 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
81 schema:sdPublisher N4d3b54f6d413480eabbc3d9c50e3696c
82 schema:startDate 2011-04-15T00:00:00Z
83 schema:url http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8454545
84 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
85 sgo:sdDataset grants
86 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
87 N0c3d3dc1cf81408690fdbacd7fc33b2b schema:member sg:person.01135067473.08
88 schema:roleName PI
89 rdf:type schema:Role
90 N4d3b54f6d413480eabbc3d9c50e3696c schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
91 rdf:type schema:Organization
92 N73b4761a2a3f4ada8fb4e33ac37d5bc6 schema:name dimensions_id
93 schema:value 2567913
94 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
95 N8e0d54c3e98741a1b5f91b01e6d73b4f schema:currency USD
96 schema:value 239075
97 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
98 Nbf5adfa8fbf64985a960f931e9681ab5 schema:name nih_id
99 schema:value R03AR061028
100 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
101 anzsrc-for:2206 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
102 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
103 sg:person.01135067473.08 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.42505.36
104 schema:familyName KOBIELAK
105 schema:givenName KRZYSZTOF
106 rdf:type schema:Person
107 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420086.8 schema:Organization
108 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.42505.36 schema:name UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
109 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...