Endothelial Vasamotor Function In The Framingham Study View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

1998-2003

FUNDING AMOUNT

843224.0 USD

ABSTRACT

Current research suggests that loss of the vasodilator, anti-thrombotic, and anti-inflammatory properties of the vascular endothelium plays a dynamic role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Impaired endothelial function, including impaired nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation is associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Further, there is growing evidence that endothelial function can be improved by risk modification. However, the available studies have not definitively resolved the issue of the cross-sectional correlates of endothelial dysfunction because they have been limited to small samples of highly selected patients. For example, it remains unclear whether hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, or elevated glucose levels are independent determinants of endothelial dysfunction. Most importantly, no study has shown a relation between endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Such a demonstration would increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and aid clinicians in identifying high risk individuals who would benefit most from intervention. Completion of such a study will require assessment of endothelial function in a large, well-characterized population. Recently, a rapid, non-invasive method for assessment of endothelial function was developed using brachial artery ultrasound. Using this method, endothelial function will be examined in about 3,800 men and women of the Framingham Heart Study. The specific objects of this proposal are to: 1. Examine the cross-sectional correlates of endothelial function with known coronary risk factors, 2. Perform cross- sectional analyses on the relation of endothelial function to prevalent cardiovascular disease, 3. Observe the adjusted relation of endothelial function to incident and recurrent cardiovascular events. Our central hypothesis is that the presence of endothelial dysfunction is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease events. The Framingham Study is uniquely suited for this proposal by virtue of the single site population-based design, the broad age range of subjects, the availability of extensive antecedent and contemporary risk factor data, expertise in non-invasive imaging and quality control procedures, and the availability of long-term, longitudinal follow-up. The proposed study provides a unique opportunity to assess the prognostic importance of endothelial function and is likely to yield new information that will directly improve the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. More... »

URL

http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6476833

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/32", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "USD", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": 843224.0
    }, 
    "description": "Current research suggests that loss of the vasodilator, anti-thrombotic, and anti-inflammatory properties of the vascular endothelium plays a dynamic role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Impaired endothelial function, including impaired nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation is associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Further, there is growing evidence that endothelial function can be improved by risk modification. However, the available studies have not definitively resolved the issue of the cross-sectional correlates of endothelial dysfunction because they have been limited to small samples of highly selected patients. For example, it remains unclear whether hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, or elevated glucose levels are independent determinants of endothelial dysfunction. Most importantly, no study has shown a relation between endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Such a demonstration would increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and aid clinicians in identifying high risk individuals who would benefit most from intervention. Completion of such a study will require assessment of endothelial function in a large, well-characterized population. Recently, a rapid, non-invasive method for assessment of endothelial function was developed using brachial artery ultrasound. Using this method, endothelial function will be examined in about 3,800 men and women of the Framingham Heart Study. The specific objects of this proposal are to: 1. Examine the cross-sectional correlates of endothelial function with known coronary risk factors, 2. Perform cross- sectional analyses on the relation of endothelial function to prevalent cardiovascular disease, 3. Observe the adjusted relation of endothelial function to incident and recurrent cardiovascular events. Our central hypothesis is that the presence of endothelial dysfunction is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease events. The Framingham Study is uniquely suited for this proposal by virtue of the single site population-based design, the broad age range of subjects, the availability of extensive antecedent and contemporary risk factor data, expertise in non-invasive imaging and quality control procedures, and the availability of long-term, longitudinal follow-up. The proposed study provides a unique opportunity to assess the prognostic importance of endothelial function and is likely to yield new information that will directly improve the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease.", 
    "endDate": "2003-11-30", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.279885.9", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.2536290", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "grant.2536290"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nih_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "R01HL060040"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "endothelial function", 
      "endothelial dysfunction", 
      "cardiovascular disease", 
      "cross-sectional correlates", 
      "risk factors", 
      "Framingham Study", 
      "nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation", 
      "cardiovascular disease risk factors", 
      "coronary risk factors", 
      "impaired endothelial function", 
      "recurrent cardiovascular events", 
      "independent risk factor", 
      "cardiovascular disease events", 
      "brachial artery ultrasound", 
      "disease risk factors", 
      "prevalent cardiovascular disease", 
      "anti-inflammatory properties", 
      "risk factor data", 
      "high-risk individuals", 
      "elevated glucose levels", 
      "Framingham Heart Study", 
      "cross-sectional analysis", 
      "cardiovascular events", 
      "cardiovascular risk", 
      "independent determinants", 
      "non-invasive imaging", 
      "prognostic importance", 
      "risk modification", 
      "non-invasive method", 
      "population-based design", 
      "glucose levels", 
      "broad age range", 
      "disease events", 
      "Heart Study", 
      "vascular endothelium", 
      "risk individuals", 
      "aid clinicians", 
      "dysfunction", 
      "disease", 
      "age range", 
      "available studies", 
      "pathogenesis", 
      "factor data", 
      "correlates", 
      "hypertension", 
      "vasodilators", 
      "vasodilation", 
      "hypercholesterolemia", 
      "patients", 
      "study", 
      "clinicians", 
      "factors", 
      "endothelium", 
      "prevention", 
      "women", 
      "assessment", 
      "ultrasound", 
      "intervention", 
      "men", 
      "risk", 
      "subjects", 
      "events", 
      "function", 
      "imaging", 
      "unique opportunity", 
      "population", 
      "dynamic role", 
      "individuals", 
      "control procedures", 
      "evidence", 
      "new information", 
      "determinants", 
      "completion", 
      "management", 
      "small samples", 
      "levels", 
      "role", 
      "central hypothesis", 
      "quality control procedures", 
      "loss", 
      "procedure", 
      "current research", 
      "hypothesis", 
      "presence", 
      "availability", 
      "relation", 
      "samples", 
      "data", 
      "demonstration", 
      "expertise", 
      "incidents", 
      "method", 
      "importance", 
      "analysis", 
      "understanding", 
      "modification", 
      "information", 
      "research", 
      "opportunities", 
      "issues", 
      "range", 
      "design", 
      "antecedents", 
      "virtue", 
      "proposal", 
      "properties", 
      "specific objects", 
      "example", 
      "objects"
    ], 
    "name": "ENDOTHELIAL VASAMOTOR FUNCTION IN THE FRAMINGHAM STUDY", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.189504.1", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/None", 
          "name": "BOSTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CAMPUS", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "BENJAMIN", 
        "givenName": "EMELIA J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01153350506.35", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.01153350506.35", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2536290"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-12-01T06:57", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221201/entities/gbq_results/grant/grant_26.jsonl", 
    "startDate": "1998-12-15", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6476833"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2536290'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2536290'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2536290'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2536290'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

153 TRIPLES      18 PREDICATES      130 URIs      122 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.2536290 schema:about anzsrc-for:32
2 schema:amount N832dc7c400a144e49d67ec115fa15d5e
3 schema:description Current research suggests that loss of the vasodilator, anti-thrombotic, and anti-inflammatory properties of the vascular endothelium plays a dynamic role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Impaired endothelial function, including impaired nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation is associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Further, there is growing evidence that endothelial function can be improved by risk modification. However, the available studies have not definitively resolved the issue of the cross-sectional correlates of endothelial dysfunction because they have been limited to small samples of highly selected patients. For example, it remains unclear whether hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, or elevated glucose levels are independent determinants of endothelial dysfunction. Most importantly, no study has shown a relation between endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Such a demonstration would increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and aid clinicians in identifying high risk individuals who would benefit most from intervention. Completion of such a study will require assessment of endothelial function in a large, well-characterized population. Recently, a rapid, non-invasive method for assessment of endothelial function was developed using brachial artery ultrasound. Using this method, endothelial function will be examined in about 3,800 men and women of the Framingham Heart Study. The specific objects of this proposal are to: 1. Examine the cross-sectional correlates of endothelial function with known coronary risk factors, 2. Perform cross- sectional analyses on the relation of endothelial function to prevalent cardiovascular disease, 3. Observe the adjusted relation of endothelial function to incident and recurrent cardiovascular events. Our central hypothesis is that the presence of endothelial dysfunction is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease events. The Framingham Study is uniquely suited for this proposal by virtue of the single site population-based design, the broad age range of subjects, the availability of extensive antecedent and contemporary risk factor data, expertise in non-invasive imaging and quality control procedures, and the availability of long-term, longitudinal follow-up. The proposed study provides a unique opportunity to assess the prognostic importance of endothelial function and is likely to yield new information that will directly improve the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease.
4 schema:endDate 2003-11-30
5 schema:funder grid-institutes:grid.279885.9
6 schema:identifier N123b540348594503b631df27169c70d6
7 N5a1a315648304dc393e2b38709a62a48
8 schema:keywords Framingham Heart Study
9 Framingham Study
10 Heart Study
11 age range
12 aid clinicians
13 analysis
14 antecedents
15 anti-inflammatory properties
16 assessment
17 availability
18 available studies
19 brachial artery ultrasound
20 broad age range
21 cardiovascular disease
22 cardiovascular disease events
23 cardiovascular disease risk factors
24 cardiovascular events
25 cardiovascular risk
26 central hypothesis
27 clinicians
28 completion
29 control procedures
30 coronary risk factors
31 correlates
32 cross-sectional analysis
33 cross-sectional correlates
34 current research
35 data
36 demonstration
37 design
38 determinants
39 disease
40 disease events
41 disease risk factors
42 dynamic role
43 dysfunction
44 elevated glucose levels
45 endothelial dysfunction
46 endothelial function
47 endothelium
48 events
49 evidence
50 example
51 expertise
52 factor data
53 factors
54 function
55 glucose levels
56 high-risk individuals
57 hypercholesterolemia
58 hypertension
59 hypothesis
60 imaging
61 impaired endothelial function
62 importance
63 incidents
64 independent determinants
65 independent risk factor
66 individuals
67 information
68 intervention
69 issues
70 levels
71 loss
72 management
73 men
74 method
75 modification
76 new information
77 nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation
78 non-invasive imaging
79 non-invasive method
80 objects
81 opportunities
82 pathogenesis
83 patients
84 population
85 population-based design
86 presence
87 prevalent cardiovascular disease
88 prevention
89 procedure
90 prognostic importance
91 properties
92 proposal
93 quality control procedures
94 range
95 recurrent cardiovascular events
96 relation
97 research
98 risk
99 risk factor data
100 risk factors
101 risk individuals
102 risk modification
103 role
104 samples
105 small samples
106 specific objects
107 study
108 subjects
109 ultrasound
110 understanding
111 unique opportunity
112 vascular endothelium
113 vasodilation
114 vasodilators
115 virtue
116 women
117 schema:name ENDOTHELIAL VASAMOTOR FUNCTION IN THE FRAMINGHAM STUDY
118 schema:recipient N49859361897d476b993bdb26e65eb73a
119 sg:person.01153350506.35
120 grid-institutes:grid.189504.1
121 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2536290
122 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-12-01T06:57
123 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
124 schema:sdPublisher N9b468bff0c474f10b9793c1a57ec68f9
125 schema:startDate 1998-12-15
126 schema:url http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6476833
127 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
128 sgo:sdDataset grants
129 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
130 N123b540348594503b631df27169c70d6 schema:name nih_id
131 schema:value R01HL060040
132 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
133 N49859361897d476b993bdb26e65eb73a schema:member sg:person.01153350506.35
134 schema:roleName PI
135 rdf:type schema:Role
136 N5a1a315648304dc393e2b38709a62a48 schema:name dimensions_id
137 schema:value grant.2536290
138 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
139 N832dc7c400a144e49d67ec115fa15d5e schema:currency USD
140 schema:value 843224.0
141 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
142 N9b468bff0c474f10b9793c1a57ec68f9 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
143 rdf:type schema:Organization
144 anzsrc-for:32 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
145 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
146 sg:person.01153350506.35 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:None
147 schema:familyName BENJAMIN
148 schema:givenName EMELIA J.
149 rdf:type schema:Person
150 grid-institutes:None schema:name BOSTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CAMPUS
151 rdf:type schema:Organization
152 grid-institutes:grid.189504.1 schema:Organization
153 grid-institutes:grid.279885.9 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...