The Nuclear Pore Complex: Interphase and Mitotic Function View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2000-2014

FUNDING AMOUNT

3617275 USD

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Accurate inheritance of genomic content during cell division is dependent on synchronized changes in cellular organization and chromosome dynamics. In higher eukaryotes, once chromosomes have undergone condensation, the nuclear membranes, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear lamina are disassembled in concert. The long-term goal of this project is to elucidate how events of mitosis are orchestrated. The interface between nuclear pore protein function and the cell cycle is an emerging and critical piece of this puzzle. Here, recently identified roles of the nucleoporin Nup153 at mitosis will be pursued. Mechanisms that integrate events of mitotic disassembly will also be investigated, as well as how disassembly is connected with nuclear reassembly at the end of mitosis. Specifically, in Aim 1, knockdown of Nup153 in mammalian cells in combination with a structure-function rescue analysis will be employed to decipher the functions of Nup153 in both early and late mitosis. In order to track which specific hallmarks of mitosis are altered, events of cell division will be monitored by live imaging. Identification of relevant protein partners, through both candidate and unbiased approaches, will be used to further hone in on the contributions of Nup153. The second Aim is focused on characterizing the role of sumoylation in regulating Nup153 function. The site(s) of sumoylation will be mapped and the functional consequence of interfering with this modification will be tested, both in knockdown-rescue experiments as well as with respect to specific features of pore architecture. Finally, in the third Aim, nuclei reconstituted in the cell-free Xenopus egg extract system will be used as a tool to investigate the role of the small GTPase Arf and its ability to stimulate phospholipase D as a node that provides an integrative signal for lamina and membrane disassembly. A role for COPI in organizing membrane populations at mitosis and how this affects the consequent participation of membranes in reassembly of the nuclear envelope will be tested. This research will yield new insight into the events of cell division and how they are coordinated. In turn, this information will impact our understanding of how abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA content arise, which is an imperative step in deciphering the molecular events that lead to cancerous cell proliferation. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The goals of this research are to better understand how the events of cell division are orchestrated. When this coordination is disrupted, the cell nucleus does not reform properly. Such defects in morphology and DNA content are hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells, and the research proposed here will contribute to a better understanding of how these alterations arise. More... »

URL

http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8286293

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2206", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "USD", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": "3617275"
    }, 
    "description": "DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Accurate inheritance of genomic content during cell division is dependent on synchronized changes in cellular organization and chromosome dynamics. In higher eukaryotes, once chromosomes have undergone condensation, the nuclear membranes, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear lamina are disassembled in concert. The long-term goal of this project is to elucidate how events of mitosis are orchestrated. The interface between nuclear pore protein function and the cell cycle is an emerging and critical piece of this puzzle. Here, recently identified roles of the nucleoporin Nup153 at mitosis will be pursued. Mechanisms that integrate events of mitotic disassembly will also be investigated, as well as how disassembly is connected with nuclear reassembly at the end of mitosis. Specifically, in Aim 1, knockdown of Nup153 in mammalian cells in combination with a structure-function rescue analysis will be employed to decipher the functions of Nup153 in both early and late mitosis. In order to track which specific hallmarks of mitosis are altered, events of cell division will be monitored by live imaging. Identification of relevant protein partners, through both candidate and unbiased approaches, will be used to further hone in on the contributions of Nup153. The second Aim is focused on characterizing the role of sumoylation in regulating Nup153 function. The site(s) of sumoylation will be mapped and the functional consequence of interfering with this modification will be tested, both in knockdown-rescue experiments as well as with respect to specific features of pore architecture. Finally, in the third Aim, nuclei reconstituted in the cell-free Xenopus egg extract system will be used as a tool to investigate the role of the small GTPase Arf and its ability to stimulate phospholipase D as a node that provides an integrative signal for lamina and membrane disassembly. A role for COPI in organizing membrane populations at mitosis and how this affects the consequent participation of membranes in reassembly of the nuclear envelope will be tested. This research will yield new insight into the events of cell division and how they are coordinated. In turn, this information will impact our understanding of how abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA content arise, which is an imperative step in deciphering the molecular events that lead to cancerous cell proliferation. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The goals of this research are to better understand how the events of cell division are orchestrated. When this coordination is disrupted, the cell nucleus does not reform properly. Such defects in morphology and DNA content are hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells, and the research proposed here will contribute to a better understanding of how these alterations arise.", 
    "endDate": "2014-06-30T00:00:00Z", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.280785.0", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.2516610", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "2516610"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nih_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "R01GM061275"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "reassembly", 
      "knockdown-rescue experiments", 
      "relevant protein partners", 
      "modification", 
      "nucleoporin Nup153", 
      "long-term goal", 
      "aggressive cancer cells", 
      "cell cycle", 
      "membrane", 
      "alterations", 
      "functional consequences", 
      "research", 
      "cell nucleus", 
      "function", 
      "nuclear lamina", 
      "cellular organization", 
      "end", 
      "project", 
      "nuclear pore complex", 
      "specific features", 
      "molecular events", 
      "turn", 
      "imperative step", 
      "chromosome dynamics", 
      "DNA content", 
      "role", 
      "understanding", 
      "mechanism", 
      "identification", 
      "late mitosis", 
      "cancerous cell proliferation", 
      "cell division", 
      "second aim", 
      "interphase", 
      "cell-free Xenopus egg extract system", 
      "puzzle", 
      "nuclear reassembly", 
      "tool", 
      "small GTPase ARF", 
      "nuclei", 
      "concert", 
      "phospholipase D", 
      "public health relevance", 
      "morphology", 
      "critical piece", 
      "such defects", 
      "consequent participation", 
      "accurate inheritance", 
      "knockdown", 
      "unbiased approach", 
      "mitotic disassembly", 
      "DNA content arise", 
      "applicants", 
      "description", 
      "mammalian cells", 
      "genomic content", 
      "mitotic functions", 
      "changes", 
      "site(s", 
      "Aim 1", 
      "abnormal nuclear morphology", 
      "hallmark", 
      "order", 
      "events", 
      "nodes", 
      "better understanding", 
      "integrative signal", 
      "Nup153", 
      "lamina", 
      "goal", 
      "higher eukaryotes", 
      "condensation", 
      "structure-function rescue analysis", 
      "coordination", 
      "mitosis", 
      "nuclear pore protein function", 
      "combination", 
      "live imaging", 
      "chromosomes", 
      "membrane populations", 
      "respect", 
      "third aim", 
      "pore architecture", 
      "COPI", 
      "nuclear envelope", 
      "Nup153 function", 
      "specific hallmarks", 
      "interface", 
      "contribution", 
      "candidates", 
      "SUMOylation", 
      "information", 
      "ability", 
      "nuclear membrane", 
      "new insights"
    ], 
    "name": "The Nuclear Pore Complex: Interphase and Mitotic Function", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.223827.e", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.223827.e", 
          "name": "UNIVERSITY OF UTAH", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "ULLMAN", 
        "givenName": "KATHARINE S", 
        "id": "sg:person.0614240562.68", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.0614240562.68", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2516610"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T12:17", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/nih_projects_9.xml.gz", 
    "startDate": "2000-07-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8286293"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2516610'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2516610'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2516610'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2516610'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

139 TRIPLES      19 PREDICATES      117 URIs      109 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.2516610 schema:about anzsrc-for:2206
2 schema:amount Nd117f58460b84b15ae365467ca83d475
3 schema:description DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Accurate inheritance of genomic content during cell division is dependent on synchronized changes in cellular organization and chromosome dynamics. In higher eukaryotes, once chromosomes have undergone condensation, the nuclear membranes, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear lamina are disassembled in concert. The long-term goal of this project is to elucidate how events of mitosis are orchestrated. The interface between nuclear pore protein function and the cell cycle is an emerging and critical piece of this puzzle. Here, recently identified roles of the nucleoporin Nup153 at mitosis will be pursued. Mechanisms that integrate events of mitotic disassembly will also be investigated, as well as how disassembly is connected with nuclear reassembly at the end of mitosis. Specifically, in Aim 1, knockdown of Nup153 in mammalian cells in combination with a structure-function rescue analysis will be employed to decipher the functions of Nup153 in both early and late mitosis. In order to track which specific hallmarks of mitosis are altered, events of cell division will be monitored by live imaging. Identification of relevant protein partners, through both candidate and unbiased approaches, will be used to further hone in on the contributions of Nup153. The second Aim is focused on characterizing the role of sumoylation in regulating Nup153 function. The site(s) of sumoylation will be mapped and the functional consequence of interfering with this modification will be tested, both in knockdown-rescue experiments as well as with respect to specific features of pore architecture. Finally, in the third Aim, nuclei reconstituted in the cell-free Xenopus egg extract system will be used as a tool to investigate the role of the small GTPase Arf and its ability to stimulate phospholipase D as a node that provides an integrative signal for lamina and membrane disassembly. A role for COPI in organizing membrane populations at mitosis and how this affects the consequent participation of membranes in reassembly of the nuclear envelope will be tested. This research will yield new insight into the events of cell division and how they are coordinated. In turn, this information will impact our understanding of how abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA content arise, which is an imperative step in deciphering the molecular events that lead to cancerous cell proliferation. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The goals of this research are to better understand how the events of cell division are orchestrated. When this coordination is disrupted, the cell nucleus does not reform properly. Such defects in morphology and DNA content are hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells, and the research proposed here will contribute to a better understanding of how these alterations arise.
4 schema:endDate 2014-06-30T00:00:00Z
5 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.280785.0
6 schema:identifier N5102733845ff4934b462feb019e31e24
7 Ncd8ab605304c4c59bcb2c3bb847c8075
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:keywords Aim 1
10 COPI
11 DNA content
12 DNA content arise
13 Nup153
14 Nup153 function
15 SUMOylation
16 ability
17 abnormal nuclear morphology
18 accurate inheritance
19 aggressive cancer cells
20 alterations
21 applicants
22 better understanding
23 cancerous cell proliferation
24 candidates
25 cell cycle
26 cell division
27 cell nucleus
28 cell-free Xenopus egg extract system
29 cellular organization
30 changes
31 chromosome dynamics
32 chromosomes
33 combination
34 concert
35 condensation
36 consequent participation
37 contribution
38 coordination
39 critical piece
40 description
41 end
42 events
43 function
44 functional consequences
45 genomic content
46 goal
47 hallmark
48 higher eukaryotes
49 identification
50 imperative step
51 information
52 integrative signal
53 interface
54 interphase
55 knockdown
56 knockdown-rescue experiments
57 lamina
58 late mitosis
59 live imaging
60 long-term goal
61 mammalian cells
62 mechanism
63 membrane
64 membrane populations
65 mitosis
66 mitotic disassembly
67 mitotic functions
68 modification
69 molecular events
70 morphology
71 new insights
72 nodes
73 nuclear envelope
74 nuclear lamina
75 nuclear membrane
76 nuclear pore complex
77 nuclear pore protein function
78 nuclear reassembly
79 nuclei
80 nucleoporin Nup153
81 order
82 phospholipase D
83 pore architecture
84 project
85 public health relevance
86 puzzle
87 reassembly
88 relevant protein partners
89 research
90 respect
91 role
92 second aim
93 site(s
94 small GTPase ARF
95 specific features
96 specific hallmarks
97 structure-function rescue analysis
98 such defects
99 third aim
100 tool
101 turn
102 unbiased approach
103 understanding
104 schema:name The Nuclear Pore Complex: Interphase and Mitotic Function
105 schema:recipient N57b58b23398f4e219a0a8689f63d5046
106 sg:person.0614240562.68
107 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.223827.e
108 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2516610
109 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T12:17
110 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
111 schema:sdPublisher N94b60a73ba3041168c4d4fbfca4e5c65
112 schema:startDate 2000-07-01T00:00:00Z
113 schema:url http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8286293
114 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
115 sgo:sdDataset grants
116 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
117 N5102733845ff4934b462feb019e31e24 schema:name nih_id
118 schema:value R01GM061275
119 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
120 N57b58b23398f4e219a0a8689f63d5046 schema:member sg:person.0614240562.68
121 schema:roleName PI
122 rdf:type schema:Role
123 N94b60a73ba3041168c4d4fbfca4e5c65 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
124 rdf:type schema:Organization
125 Ncd8ab605304c4c59bcb2c3bb847c8075 schema:name dimensions_id
126 schema:value 2516610
127 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
128 Nd117f58460b84b15ae365467ca83d475 schema:currency USD
129 schema:value 3617275
130 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
131 anzsrc-for:2206 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
132 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
133 sg:person.0614240562.68 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.223827.e
134 schema:familyName ULLMAN
135 schema:givenName KATHARINE S
136 rdf:type schema:Person
137 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.223827.e schema:name UNIVERSITY OF UTAH
138 rdf:type schema:Organization
139 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.280785.0 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...