Intercellular Communication in Retinal Development View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

1994-2023

FUNDING AMOUNT

9151443.0 USD

ABSTRACT

Summary Neuronal information is immensely enhanced by the diversification of signals at synaptic connections. Postsynaptic cells can display very different outputs despite being connected to the same presynaptic neuron or neuronal cell type. Many pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms can give rise to signal diversification at synapses. In this proposal, we explore the synaptic wiring strategies that can lead to different signal transforms within circuits of known functions. We will determine the synaptic output arrangements of cone bipolar interneurons in the vertebrate retina. Cone bipolar cells are essential for daylight vision, and transfer information to ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina, at synaptic specializations called dyads. Information may be modified at dyads by a variety of mechanisms, including inhibition from amacrine cells. Preliminary data and previous work show that ganglion cells connected to the same bipolar cell type exhibit very different output properties. Furthermore, ganglion cell types that exhibit distinct outputs receive input from bipolar cells that are morphologically separate but respond similarly to light. Here, we will test the broad hypothesis that there is wiring specificity at synaptic dyads between different types of bipolar cells, amacrine cells and ganglion cells (Aim 1). To do so, we will use a combination of correlative fluorescence imaging and serial block face scanning electron microscopy together with confocal imaging, and transgenic approaches to reconstruct synaptic motifs between specific types of cone bipolar cells and ganglion cells. Because cone bipolar cell dyads are key to synaptic transmission in the retina, we will increase our understanding of how they are assembled properly during development using the same toolset (Aim 2a). Moreover, we still lack a clear understanding of the capacity and constraints of reconnecting neurons appropriately during retinal repair. Using a model of ganglion cell injury and recovery, we will determine how well cone bipolar cell synaptic connections are reassembled when ganglion cells regrow dendrites that had retracted after axotomy (Aim 2b). Together, our studies will significantly advance knowledge of the matrix of synaptic wiring patterns in retinal microcircuits in which visual signals diversify greatly. We will also gain a deeper understanding of how these key synaptic patterns are established during development and potentially regained during circuit regeneration. More... »

URL

http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=10238060

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "USD", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": 9151443.0
    }, 
    "description": "Summary Neuronal information is immensely enhanced by the diversification of signals at synaptic connections. Postsynaptic cells can display very different outputs despite being connected to the same presynaptic neuron or neuronal cell type. Many pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms can give rise to signal diversification at synapses. In this proposal, we explore the synaptic wiring strategies that can lead to different signal transforms within circuits of known functions. We will determine the synaptic output arrangements of cone bipolar interneurons in the vertebrate retina. Cone bipolar cells are essential for daylight vision, and transfer information to ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina, at synaptic specializations called dyads. Information may be modified at dyads by a variety of mechanisms, including inhibition from amacrine cells. Preliminary data and previous work show that ganglion cells connected to the same bipolar cell type exhibit very different output properties. Furthermore, ganglion cell types that exhibit distinct outputs receive input from bipolar cells that are morphologically separate but respond similarly to light. Here, we will test the broad hypothesis that there is wiring specificity at synaptic dyads between different types of bipolar cells, amacrine cells and ganglion cells (Aim 1). To do so, we will use a combination of correlative fluorescence imaging and serial block face scanning electron microscopy together with confocal imaging, and transgenic approaches to reconstruct synaptic motifs between specific types of cone bipolar cells and ganglion cells. Because cone bipolar cell dyads are key to synaptic transmission in the retina, we will increase our understanding of how they are assembled properly during development using the same toolset (Aim 2a). Moreover, we still lack a clear understanding of the capacity and constraints of reconnecting neurons appropriately during retinal repair. Using a model of ganglion cell injury and recovery, we will determine how well cone bipolar cell synaptic connections are reassembled when ganglion cells regrow dendrites that had retracted after axotomy (Aim 2b). Together, our studies will significantly advance knowledge of the matrix of synaptic wiring patterns in retinal microcircuits in which visual signals diversify greatly. We will also gain a deeper understanding of how these key synaptic patterns are established during development and potentially regained during circuit regeneration.", 
    "endDate": "2023-08-31", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.280030.9", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.2506237", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "grant.2506237"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nih_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "R01EY010699"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "cone bipolar cells", 
      "ganglion cells", 
      "bipolar cells", 
      "amacrine cells", 
      "synaptic connections", 
      "same presynaptic neuron", 
      "bipolar cell dyads", 
      "ganglion cell injury", 
      "ganglion cell types", 
      "neuronal cell types", 
      "cell types", 
      "postsynaptic mechanisms", 
      "synaptic specializations", 
      "synaptic transmission", 
      "presynaptic neurons", 
      "cell injury", 
      "bipolar interneurons", 
      "postsynaptic cell", 
      "retinal repair", 
      "retinal microcircuits", 
      "synaptic patterns", 
      "wiring specificity", 
      "retinal development", 
      "neuronal information", 
      "daylight vision", 
      "retina", 
      "neurons", 
      "preliminary data", 
      "vertebrate retina", 
      "variety of mechanisms", 
      "output neurons", 
      "intercellular communication", 
      "cells", 
      "confocal imaging", 
      "wiring strategies", 
      "imaging", 
      "axotomy", 
      "interneurons", 
      "injury", 
      "visual signals", 
      "wiring patterns", 
      "synapses", 
      "fluorescence imaging", 
      "inhibition", 
      "specific types", 
      "repair", 
      "dyads", 
      "dendrites", 
      "clear understanding", 
      "specificity", 
      "mechanism", 
      "microcircuits", 
      "development", 
      "types", 
      "patterns", 
      "recovery", 
      "study", 
      "transgenic approaches", 
      "serial block face", 
      "regeneration", 
      "understanding", 
      "different types", 
      "transmission", 
      "hypothesis", 
      "information", 
      "broad hypotheses", 
      "combination", 
      "diversification of signals", 
      "function", 
      "data", 
      "strategies", 
      "signal diversification", 
      "knowledge", 
      "distinct outputs", 
      "vision", 
      "variety", 
      "capacity", 
      "deeper understanding", 
      "face", 
      "output", 
      "block face", 
      "connection", 
      "signals", 
      "electron microscopy", 
      "type exhibit", 
      "output properties", 
      "specialization", 
      "exhibit", 
      "model", 
      "microscopy", 
      "approach", 
      "communication", 
      "previous work", 
      "motif", 
      "circuit", 
      "input", 
      "work", 
      "properties", 
      "arrangement", 
      "proposal", 
      "matrix", 
      "different outputs", 
      "diversification", 
      "constraints", 
      "toolset", 
      "transform", 
      "signal transforms"
    ], 
    "name": "Intercellular Communication in Retinal Development", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.34477.33", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/None", 
          "name": "UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "WONG", 
        "givenName": "RACHEL O", 
        "id": "sg:person.012033226162.55", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.012033226162.55", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2506237"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-08-04T17:24", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220804/entities/gbq_results/grant/grant_30.jsonl", 
    "startDate": "1994-07-01", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=10238060"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2506237'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2506237'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2506237'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2506237'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

151 TRIPLES      18 PREDICATES      128 URIs      120 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.2506237 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 schema:amount N75349cb0d65146b4a63f8dcbe7ff3ebf
3 schema:description Summary Neuronal information is immensely enhanced by the diversification of signals at synaptic connections. Postsynaptic cells can display very different outputs despite being connected to the same presynaptic neuron or neuronal cell type. Many pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms can give rise to signal diversification at synapses. In this proposal, we explore the synaptic wiring strategies that can lead to different signal transforms within circuits of known functions. We will determine the synaptic output arrangements of cone bipolar interneurons in the vertebrate retina. Cone bipolar cells are essential for daylight vision, and transfer information to ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina, at synaptic specializations called dyads. Information may be modified at dyads by a variety of mechanisms, including inhibition from amacrine cells. Preliminary data and previous work show that ganglion cells connected to the same bipolar cell type exhibit very different output properties. Furthermore, ganglion cell types that exhibit distinct outputs receive input from bipolar cells that are morphologically separate but respond similarly to light. Here, we will test the broad hypothesis that there is wiring specificity at synaptic dyads between different types of bipolar cells, amacrine cells and ganglion cells (Aim 1). To do so, we will use a combination of correlative fluorescence imaging and serial block face scanning electron microscopy together with confocal imaging, and transgenic approaches to reconstruct synaptic motifs between specific types of cone bipolar cells and ganglion cells. Because cone bipolar cell dyads are key to synaptic transmission in the retina, we will increase our understanding of how they are assembled properly during development using the same toolset (Aim 2a). Moreover, we still lack a clear understanding of the capacity and constraints of reconnecting neurons appropriately during retinal repair. Using a model of ganglion cell injury and recovery, we will determine how well cone bipolar cell synaptic connections are reassembled when ganglion cells regrow dendrites that had retracted after axotomy (Aim 2b). Together, our studies will significantly advance knowledge of the matrix of synaptic wiring patterns in retinal microcircuits in which visual signals diversify greatly. We will also gain a deeper understanding of how these key synaptic patterns are established during development and potentially regained during circuit regeneration.
4 schema:endDate 2023-08-31
5 schema:funder grid-institutes:grid.280030.9
6 schema:identifier Nb0437e36bbd3424c92b20c8f28f5cbac
7 Neab715f2c9d2408e8183d59dbf67b722
8 schema:keywords amacrine cells
9 approach
10 arrangement
11 axotomy
12 bipolar cell dyads
13 bipolar cells
14 bipolar interneurons
15 block face
16 broad hypotheses
17 capacity
18 cell injury
19 cell types
20 cells
21 circuit
22 clear understanding
23 combination
24 communication
25 cone bipolar cells
26 confocal imaging
27 connection
28 constraints
29 data
30 daylight vision
31 deeper understanding
32 dendrites
33 development
34 different outputs
35 different types
36 distinct outputs
37 diversification
38 diversification of signals
39 dyads
40 electron microscopy
41 exhibit
42 face
43 fluorescence imaging
44 function
45 ganglion cell injury
46 ganglion cell types
47 ganglion cells
48 hypothesis
49 imaging
50 information
51 inhibition
52 injury
53 input
54 intercellular communication
55 interneurons
56 knowledge
57 matrix
58 mechanism
59 microcircuits
60 microscopy
61 model
62 motif
63 neuronal cell types
64 neuronal information
65 neurons
66 output
67 output neurons
68 output properties
69 patterns
70 postsynaptic cell
71 postsynaptic mechanisms
72 preliminary data
73 presynaptic neurons
74 previous work
75 properties
76 proposal
77 recovery
78 regeneration
79 repair
80 retina
81 retinal development
82 retinal microcircuits
83 retinal repair
84 same presynaptic neuron
85 serial block face
86 signal diversification
87 signal transforms
88 signals
89 specialization
90 specific types
91 specificity
92 strategies
93 study
94 synapses
95 synaptic connections
96 synaptic patterns
97 synaptic specializations
98 synaptic transmission
99 toolset
100 transform
101 transgenic approaches
102 transmission
103 type exhibit
104 types
105 understanding
106 variety
107 variety of mechanisms
108 vertebrate retina
109 vision
110 visual signals
111 wiring patterns
112 wiring specificity
113 wiring strategies
114 work
115 schema:name Intercellular Communication in Retinal Development
116 schema:recipient N77d68f60f34d4ba4a9c7f910abb997b5
117 sg:person.012033226162.55
118 grid-institutes:grid.34477.33
119 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2506237
120 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-08-04T17:24
121 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
122 schema:sdPublisher N6f3e810fa80a4be1b08c3bd2d991593a
123 schema:startDate 1994-07-01
124 schema:url http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=10238060
125 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
126 sgo:sdDataset grants
127 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
128 N6f3e810fa80a4be1b08c3bd2d991593a schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
129 rdf:type schema:Organization
130 N75349cb0d65146b4a63f8dcbe7ff3ebf schema:currency USD
131 schema:value 9151443.0
132 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
133 N77d68f60f34d4ba4a9c7f910abb997b5 schema:member sg:person.012033226162.55
134 schema:roleName PI
135 rdf:type schema:Role
136 Nb0437e36bbd3424c92b20c8f28f5cbac schema:name nih_id
137 schema:value R01EY010699
138 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
139 Neab715f2c9d2408e8183d59dbf67b722 schema:name dimensions_id
140 schema:value grant.2506237
141 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
142 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
143 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
144 sg:person.012033226162.55 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:None
145 schema:familyName WONG
146 schema:givenName RACHEL O
147 rdf:type schema:Person
148 grid-institutes:None schema:name UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
149 rdf:type schema:Organization
150 grid-institutes:grid.280030.9 schema:Organization
151 grid-institutes:grid.34477.33 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...