Mechanisms of sylvatic dengue emergence View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MonetaryGrant     


Grant Info

YEARS

2008-2013

FUNDING AMOUNT

2503416 USD

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A central goal of our research is to understand the mechanisms that enable arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) to emerge from sylvatic, zoonotic cycles into circulation among humans, thereby causing endemic or epidemic disease. In this project, we will investigate the mechanisms by which 2 arboviruses with important public health impacts, dengue (DENV) and chikungunya viruses (CHIKV), emerge from sylvatic cycles in non-human primates in Senegal to circulate among humans. The results will be critical for assessing the feasibility of strategies to control or eradicate these pathogens when vaccines become available. DENV and CHIKV are ideal viruses to study in tandem in this region because they share vectors and reservoir hosts, their history of emergence has been investigated through extensive genetic studies, and they have been under continuous surveillance in Senegal by the Institut Pasteur since 1972. Endemic/epidemic DENV infects 100 million people per year in over 100 countries, causing classical dengue fever as well as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, while CHIKV has caused recent epidemics involving over 2 million persons with severe arthritic disease. Our previous studies indicate that DENV-1, -2 and -4 evolved independently from ancestral, sylvatic DENV strains that circulate in West Africa and Malaysia, where they are transmitted among nonhuman primate reservoir hosts by arboreal Aedes spp. mosquitoes. Moreover, we have generated phylogenetic evidence that CHIKV originated in Africa, where it persists in a sylvatic cycle, and subsequently spread to Asia where it circulates among humans in urban settings. However the mechanisms involved in generating the endemic/epidemic cycles of each of these viruses are unknown. In the proposed research, we will investigate prospectively the degree and nature of contact between humans and the sylvatic transmission cycles of DENV and CHIKV, and the potential for this contact to lead to emergence. We hypothesize that 3 factors determine the probability of emergence of a sylvatic arbovirus: (i) the temporal and spatial dynamics of the virus in its sylvatic cycle, (ii) the degree of contact between humans and the sylvatic cycle, and (iii) the magnitude of genetic change required for the sylvatic strains to circulate among humans. We will integrate modeling and field studies to generate tools that can be used to predict the risk of human infection and emergence. The results of this multidisciplinary project will improve our understanding of emergence mechanisms of DENV, CHIKV and other zoonotic, sylvatic arboviral pathogens including Zika virus, another arbovirus enzootic in eastern Senegal that recently emerged in Micronesia to cause a DEN-like epidemic. Other major benefits include (i) characterization of a wide variety of arboviral febrile disease etiologies in West Africa, where there is little known about their disease burden;(ii) improved clinical diagnostics in eastern Senegal, (iii) identification of risk factors for arboviral infections, and (iv) training of young American and Senegalese scientists in both field and laboratory approaches to studying emerging arboviral diseases. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: We will investigate the mechanisms by which 2 arboviruses with important public health impacts, dengue (DENV) and chikungunya viruses (CHIKV), emerge from a sylvatic cycle in non-human primates in Senegal to circulate among humans. We will investigate prospectively the degree and nature of contact between humans and their sylvatic transmission cycles, and the potential for this contact to lead to emergence. The results will improve our understanding of emergence mechanisms of DENV, CHIKV and other zoonotic, sylvatic arboviral pathogens including Zika virus, another arbovirus enzootic in eastern Senegal that recently emerged in Micronesia to cause a DEN-like epidemic. More... »

URL

http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8134774

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2211", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "amount": {
      "currency": "USD", 
      "type": "MonetaryAmount", 
      "value": "2503416"
    }, 
    "description": "DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A central goal of our research is to understand the mechanisms that enable arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) to emerge from sylvatic, zoonotic cycles into circulation among humans, thereby causing endemic or epidemic disease. In this project, we will investigate the mechanisms by which 2 arboviruses with important public health impacts, dengue (DENV) and chikungunya viruses (CHIKV), emerge from sylvatic cycles in non-human primates in Senegal to circulate among humans. The results will be critical for assessing the feasibility of strategies to control or eradicate these pathogens when vaccines become available. DENV and CHIKV are ideal viruses to study in tandem in this region because they share vectors and reservoir hosts, their history of emergence has been investigated through extensive genetic studies, and they have been under continuous surveillance in Senegal by the Institut Pasteur since 1972. Endemic/epidemic DENV infects 100 million people per year in over 100 countries, causing classical dengue fever as well as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, while CHIKV has caused recent epidemics involving over 2 million persons with severe arthritic disease. Our previous studies indicate that DENV-1, -2 and -4 evolved independently from ancestral, sylvatic DENV strains that circulate in West Africa and Malaysia, where they are transmitted among nonhuman primate reservoir hosts by arboreal Aedes spp. mosquitoes. Moreover, we have generated phylogenetic evidence that CHIKV originated in Africa, where it persists in a sylvatic cycle, and subsequently spread to Asia where it circulates among humans in urban settings. However the mechanisms involved in generating the endemic/epidemic cycles of each of these viruses are unknown. In the proposed research, we will investigate prospectively the degree and nature of contact between humans and the sylvatic transmission cycles of DENV and CHIKV, and the potential for this contact to lead to emergence. We hypothesize that 3 factors determine the probability of emergence of a sylvatic arbovirus: (i) the temporal and spatial dynamics of the virus in its sylvatic cycle, (ii) the degree of contact between humans and the sylvatic cycle, and (iii) the magnitude of genetic change required for the sylvatic strains to circulate among humans. We will integrate modeling and field studies to generate tools that can be used to predict the risk of human infection and emergence. The results of this multidisciplinary project will improve our understanding of emergence mechanisms of DENV, CHIKV and other zoonotic, sylvatic arboviral pathogens including Zika virus, another arbovirus enzootic in eastern Senegal that recently emerged in Micronesia to cause a DEN-like epidemic. Other major benefits include (i) characterization of a wide variety of arboviral febrile disease etiologies in West Africa, where there is little known about their disease burden;(ii) improved clinical diagnostics in eastern Senegal, (iii) identification of risk factors for arboviral infections, and (iv) training of young American and Senegalese scientists in both field and laboratory approaches to studying emerging arboviral diseases. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: We will investigate the mechanisms by which 2 arboviruses with important public health impacts, dengue (DENV) and chikungunya viruses (CHIKV), emerge from a sylvatic cycle in non-human primates in Senegal to circulate among humans. We will investigate prospectively the degree and nature of contact between humans and their sylvatic transmission cycles, and the potential for this contact to lead to emergence. The results will improve our understanding of emergence mechanisms of DENV, CHIKV and other zoonotic, sylvatic arboviral pathogens including Zika virus, another arbovirus enzootic in eastern Senegal that recently emerged in Micronesia to cause a DEN-like epidemic.", 
    "endDate": "2013-08-31T00:00:00Z", 
    "funder": {
      "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.419681.3", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "id": "sg:grant.2457549", 
    "identifier": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "2457549"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nih_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "R01AI069145"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "sylvatic dengue emergence", 
      "emergence", 
      "ideal virus", 
      "sylvatic cycle", 
      "results", 
      "potential", 
      "sylvatic transmission cycle", 
      "laboratory approach", 
      "characterization", 
      "Senegalese scientists", 
      "history", 
      "modeling", 
      "non-human primates", 
      "dengue hemorrhagic fever", 
      "other zoonotic", 
      "West Africa", 
      "sylvatic arbovirus", 
      "degree", 
      "nature", 
      "epidemic cycle", 
      "probability", 
      "multidisciplinary project", 
      "risk factors", 
      "field study", 
      "Chikungunya virus", 
      "vector", 
      "humans", 
      "eastern Senegal", 
      "factors", 
      "understanding", 
      "region", 
      "mosquitoes", 
      "pathogens", 
      "zoonotic cycle", 
      "arboreal Aedes spp", 
      "description", 
      "central goal", 
      "genetic changes", 
      "applicants", 
      "DEN-like epidemic", 
      "sylvatic arboviral pathogens", 
      "sylvatic", 
      "vaccine", 
      "mechanism", 
      "spatial dynamics", 
      "sylvatic DENV strains", 
      "persons", 
      "emergence mechanism", 
      "reservoir hosts", 
      "arboviral infections", 
      "urban settings", 
      "field", 
      "people", 
      "Micronesia", 
      "recent epidemic", 
      "arthropods", 
      "Asia", 
      "tool", 
      "magnitude", 
      "DENV", 
      "human infection", 
      "other major benefits", 
      "epidemic disease", 
      "Endemic/epidemic DENV", 
      "Zika virus", 
      "virus", 
      "project", 
      "tandem", 
      "Africa", 
      "arboviral febrile disease etiologies", 
      "identification", 
      "phylogenetic evidence", 
      "improved clinical diagnostics", 
      "Malaysia", 
      "extensive genetic studies", 
      "DENV-1", 
      "nonhuman primate reservoir hosts", 
      "training", 
      "strategies", 
      "young American", 
      "years", 
      "feasibility", 
      "Mechanisms", 
      "Senegal", 
      "research", 
      "continuous surveillance", 
      "public health relevance", 
      "disease burden;(ii", 
      "sylvatic strains", 
      "countries", 
      "dengue", 
      "circulation", 
      "risk", 
      "wide variety", 
      "classical dengue fever", 
      "important public health impact", 
      "arboviruses", 
      "previous studies", 
      "arboviral diseases", 
      "dengue shock syndrome", 
      "contact", 
      "severe arthritic disease", 
      "Institut Pasteur"
    ], 
    "name": "Mechanisms of sylvatic dengue emergence", 
    "recipient": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.176731.5", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.176731.5", 
          "name": "UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BR GALVESTON", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "WEAVER", 
        "givenName": "SCOTT C", 
        "id": "sg:person.014460173337.17", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "member": "sg:person.014460173337.17", 
        "roleName": "PI", 
        "type": "Role"
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2457549"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "grants", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T12:13", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com.uberresearch.data.processor/core_data/20181219_192338/projects/base/nih_projects_5.xml.gz", 
    "startDate": "2008-09-22T00:00:00Z", 
    "type": "MonetaryGrant", 
    "url": "http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8134774"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2457549'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2457549'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2457549'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/grant.2457549'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

147 TRIPLES      19 PREDICATES      125 URIs      117 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:grant.2457549 schema:about anzsrc-for:2211
2 schema:amount Nd6208c9b78044091ad9ad456d9a1a70e
3 schema:description DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A central goal of our research is to understand the mechanisms that enable arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) to emerge from sylvatic, zoonotic cycles into circulation among humans, thereby causing endemic or epidemic disease. In this project, we will investigate the mechanisms by which 2 arboviruses with important public health impacts, dengue (DENV) and chikungunya viruses (CHIKV), emerge from sylvatic cycles in non-human primates in Senegal to circulate among humans. The results will be critical for assessing the feasibility of strategies to control or eradicate these pathogens when vaccines become available. DENV and CHIKV are ideal viruses to study in tandem in this region because they share vectors and reservoir hosts, their history of emergence has been investigated through extensive genetic studies, and they have been under continuous surveillance in Senegal by the Institut Pasteur since 1972. Endemic/epidemic DENV infects 100 million people per year in over 100 countries, causing classical dengue fever as well as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, while CHIKV has caused recent epidemics involving over 2 million persons with severe arthritic disease. Our previous studies indicate that DENV-1, -2 and -4 evolved independently from ancestral, sylvatic DENV strains that circulate in West Africa and Malaysia, where they are transmitted among nonhuman primate reservoir hosts by arboreal Aedes spp. mosquitoes. Moreover, we have generated phylogenetic evidence that CHIKV originated in Africa, where it persists in a sylvatic cycle, and subsequently spread to Asia where it circulates among humans in urban settings. However the mechanisms involved in generating the endemic/epidemic cycles of each of these viruses are unknown. In the proposed research, we will investigate prospectively the degree and nature of contact between humans and the sylvatic transmission cycles of DENV and CHIKV, and the potential for this contact to lead to emergence. We hypothesize that 3 factors determine the probability of emergence of a sylvatic arbovirus: (i) the temporal and spatial dynamics of the virus in its sylvatic cycle, (ii) the degree of contact between humans and the sylvatic cycle, and (iii) the magnitude of genetic change required for the sylvatic strains to circulate among humans. We will integrate modeling and field studies to generate tools that can be used to predict the risk of human infection and emergence. The results of this multidisciplinary project will improve our understanding of emergence mechanisms of DENV, CHIKV and other zoonotic, sylvatic arboviral pathogens including Zika virus, another arbovirus enzootic in eastern Senegal that recently emerged in Micronesia to cause a DEN-like epidemic. Other major benefits include (i) characterization of a wide variety of arboviral febrile disease etiologies in West Africa, where there is little known about their disease burden;(ii) improved clinical diagnostics in eastern Senegal, (iii) identification of risk factors for arboviral infections, and (iv) training of young American and Senegalese scientists in both field and laboratory approaches to studying emerging arboviral diseases. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: We will investigate the mechanisms by which 2 arboviruses with important public health impacts, dengue (DENV) and chikungunya viruses (CHIKV), emerge from a sylvatic cycle in non-human primates in Senegal to circulate among humans. We will investigate prospectively the degree and nature of contact between humans and their sylvatic transmission cycles, and the potential for this contact to lead to emergence. The results will improve our understanding of emergence mechanisms of DENV, CHIKV and other zoonotic, sylvatic arboviral pathogens including Zika virus, another arbovirus enzootic in eastern Senegal that recently emerged in Micronesia to cause a DEN-like epidemic.
4 schema:endDate 2013-08-31T00:00:00Z
5 schema:funder https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.419681.3
6 schema:identifier N67852822c910453b95c10adf418e08e4
7 Naedabe19c8db471b913523f13f8dffd2
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:keywords Africa
10 Asia
11 Chikungunya virus
12 DEN-like epidemic
13 DENV
14 DENV-1
15 Endemic/epidemic DENV
16 Institut Pasteur
17 Malaysia
18 Mechanisms
19 Micronesia
20 Senegal
21 Senegalese scientists
22 West Africa
23 Zika virus
24 applicants
25 arboreal Aedes spp
26 arboviral diseases
27 arboviral febrile disease etiologies
28 arboviral infections
29 arboviruses
30 arthropods
31 central goal
32 characterization
33 circulation
34 classical dengue fever
35 contact
36 continuous surveillance
37 countries
38 degree
39 dengue
40 dengue hemorrhagic fever
41 dengue shock syndrome
42 description
43 disease burden;(ii
44 eastern Senegal
45 emergence
46 emergence mechanism
47 epidemic cycle
48 epidemic disease
49 extensive genetic studies
50 factors
51 feasibility
52 field
53 field study
54 genetic changes
55 history
56 human infection
57 humans
58 ideal virus
59 identification
60 important public health impact
61 improved clinical diagnostics
62 laboratory approach
63 magnitude
64 mechanism
65 modeling
66 mosquitoes
67 multidisciplinary project
68 nature
69 non-human primates
70 nonhuman primate reservoir hosts
71 other major benefits
72 other zoonotic
73 pathogens
74 people
75 persons
76 phylogenetic evidence
77 potential
78 previous studies
79 probability
80 project
81 public health relevance
82 recent epidemic
83 region
84 research
85 reservoir hosts
86 results
87 risk
88 risk factors
89 severe arthritic disease
90 spatial dynamics
91 strategies
92 sylvatic
93 sylvatic DENV strains
94 sylvatic arboviral pathogens
95 sylvatic arbovirus
96 sylvatic cycle
97 sylvatic dengue emergence
98 sylvatic strains
99 sylvatic transmission cycle
100 tandem
101 tool
102 training
103 understanding
104 urban settings
105 vaccine
106 vector
107 virus
108 wide variety
109 years
110 young American
111 zoonotic cycle
112 schema:name Mechanisms of sylvatic dengue emergence
113 schema:recipient N991fdc9b2f1d4df7a3bbf28065946ba2
114 sg:person.014460173337.17
115 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.176731.5
116 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/grant/grant.2457549
117 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T12:13
118 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
119 schema:sdPublisher Nae1c42b5d92549f08c0456fe2191b636
120 schema:startDate 2008-09-22T00:00:00Z
121 schema:url http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8134774
122 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
123 sgo:sdDataset grants
124 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
125 N67852822c910453b95c10adf418e08e4 schema:name dimensions_id
126 schema:value 2457549
127 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
128 N991fdc9b2f1d4df7a3bbf28065946ba2 schema:member sg:person.014460173337.17
129 schema:roleName PI
130 rdf:type schema:Role
131 Nae1c42b5d92549f08c0456fe2191b636 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
132 rdf:type schema:Organization
133 Naedabe19c8db471b913523f13f8dffd2 schema:name nih_id
134 schema:value R01AI069145
135 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
136 Nd6208c9b78044091ad9ad456d9a1a70e schema:currency USD
137 schema:value 2503416
138 rdf:type schema:MonetaryAmount
139 anzsrc-for:2211 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
140 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
141 sg:person.014460173337.17 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.176731.5
142 schema:familyName WEAVER
143 schema:givenName SCOTT C
144 rdf:type schema:Person
145 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.176731.5 schema:name UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BR GALVESTON
146 rdf:type schema:Organization
147 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.419681.3 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...