Central and Peripheral Venous Catheters Associated Blood Stream Infection in the Critically Ill Patients in Assiut University Hospital View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2018-2020

ABSTRACT

Catheter related infections (CRIs) were found to be associated with several risk factors, including patient related risk factors such as age, gender, clinical status and catheter related risk factors such as the vascular access location, dwelling time, catheter type and number of lumens. In addition to the inserted solution type and the experience of the professional who performs the procedure ,These factors constitute important strategic points for actions to compare the infectious complications of peripheral versus central venous catheters in critically ill patients. Detailed Description Nosocomial (hospital-acquired) bloodstream infections (BSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality, with an estimated 250,000 cases occurring each year in the United States.BSIs may be either primary or secondary. Secondary infections are related to infections at other sites, such as the urinary tract, lung, postoperative wounds, and skin. Most nosocomial BSIs are primary, as illustrated by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system, in which 64 percent of the nosocomial BSIs reported were primary BSIs. While some primary BSIs have no identifiable source, most are associated with intravascular catheters, and central venous catheters (CVCs) in particular.Critically ill patients require intravenous administration of fluids and drugs.This can be achieved via peripheral or central catheters. Each device is associated with both mechanical and infectious complications. Complications associated with central lines are judged to be more severe. Some patients actually require the insertion of a central line due to the venous toxicity of the drugs or to the necessity of making sure that the infusion is regularly administered (example: high dose catecholamine infusion). Some physicians believe that most Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients should have a central venous line inserted, whereas others feel that some patients may receive active drugs via a peripheral line in selected instances.Endpoints are the rate of mechanical complications (difficulty in inserting the line, need for repeat insertion attempts, occurrence of arterial puncture, occurrence of pneumothorax) and of infectious complications (local catheter infection or catheter-related bloodstream infection). More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT03379948

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