Supplementation of Vitamin B12 in Pregnancy and Postpartum on Growth and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled ... View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2017-2021

ABSTRACT

Scientific basis: Globally, vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies. The only relevant source of vitamin B12 is animal-source foods and poor gut function may decrease absorption. Vitamin B12 is crucial for normal cell division and differentiation, and necessary for the development and myelination of the central nervous system. Deficiency is also associated with impaired fetal and infant growth. In the proposed study we will measure the effect of daily oral vitamin B12 supplementation to pregnant women on neurodevelopment and growth of their children. We also aim to measure the impact of B12 supplementation on several other outcomes. Study design: Individually randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial in pregnant South Asian women at risk of poor vitamin B12 status. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio. Study participants and site: 600 pregnant women from early pregnancy. Women will be enrolled as early as possible, but no later than in week 15 of pregnancy. Intervention: Daily administration of 50 µg of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy until 6 months after birth. Comparator: Placebo, identical to the vitamin B12 supplements. Outcomes: Primary: (i) neurodevelopment in children measured at 6 and 12 months of age (ii) growth in children measured by weight and length at 12 months. Secondary: (i) neurodevelopment and cognitive functioning in children at 24 months (ii) gestational age at birth, (iii) fetal and infant growth measured by weight and length at birth, after 1 month and then at 3, 6, 9, and 24 months, (iv) hemoglobin concentration in children and mothers. Relevance for programs and public health: The results from this study can suggest new dietary guidelines for South Asian women that again can lead to improved pregnancy outcomes and neurodevelopment and cognitive functioning in South Asian children. Detailed Description Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) deficiency is common in many low- and middle-income countries. This is not surprising as the main source of vitamin B12 is animal source foods, which are expensive and for cultural and religious reasons often not eaten at all. We have in several studies in women and children demonstrated that poor vitamin B12 status is common in South Asia. There is also compelling evidence that vitamin B12 deficiency occurs frequently in many other settings including pregnant women . Case studies have demonstrated harmful effects of severe vitamin B12 deficiency on the developing infant brain.The consequences of mild or subclinical vitamin deficiency are less clear but it has been shown to be associated with decreased cognitive performance in both elderly and children. Three randomized controlled trials (RCT) have measured the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on neurodevelopment in children: In a Norwegian trial, an intramuscular injection of B12 substantially improved motor development in six weeks old infants after one month. Another intervention study in low birth weight children in Norway recently confirmed these findings. The infants in these studies had evidence of suboptimal vitamin B12 status, but none were severely deficient. We found a beneficial effect of vitamin B12 supplementation for six months on neurodevelopment in young North Indian children. During pregnancy, vitamin B12 is concentrated in the fetus and stored in the liver. Infants born to vitamin B12-replete mothers have stores of vitamin B12 that are adequate to sustain them for the first several months postpartum. Consequently, vitamin B12 deficiency rarely occurs before the infant is about four months old if the mother has adequate vitamin B12 status during pregnancy. However, many infants of vitamin B12-deficient breastfeeding mothers are vulnerable to B12 deficiency from an early age. In this project we will randomise Nepalese women to receive a supplement containing 50µg cobalamin or a placebo from early pregnancy until 6 months postpartum. Hypothesis to be tested Principal hypothesis: Daily administration of vitamin B12 to pregnant women from early pregnancy until 6 months postpartum will: 1. Increase the scores of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd ed. (Bayley-III) by 0.25 SD points measured at 6 and 12 months of age. 2. Increase length for age and weight for length by 0.2 z-scores at 12 months of age. Other hypotheses to be tested (dependent on additional funding): 1. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from the start of the early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves the hemoglobin concentration in the mother and infant. 2. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves plasma vitamin B12 concentration and reduces plasma total homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentration in the mother and infant. 3. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves insulin sensitivity in the offspring. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT03071666

Related SciGraph Publications

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3177", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3158", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "description": "Scientific basis: Globally, vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies. The only relevant source of vitamin B12 is animal-source foods and poor gut function may decrease absorption. Vitamin B12 is crucial for normal cell division and differentiation, and necessary for the development and myelination of the central nervous system. Deficiency is also associated with impaired fetal and infant growth. In the proposed study we will measure the effect of daily oral vitamin B12 supplementation to pregnant women on neurodevelopment and growth of their children. We also aim to measure the impact of B12 supplementation on several other outcomes. Study design: Individually randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial in pregnant South Asian women at risk of poor vitamin B12 status. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio. Study participants and site: 600 pregnant women from early pregnancy. Women will be enrolled as early as possible, but no later than in week 15 of pregnancy. Intervention: Daily administration of 50 \u00b5g of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy until 6 months after birth. Comparator: Placebo, identical to the vitamin B12 supplements. Outcomes: Primary: (i) neurodevelopment in children measured at 6 and 12 months of age (ii) growth in children measured by weight and length at 12 months. Secondary: (i) neurodevelopment and cognitive functioning in children at 24 months (ii) gestational age at birth, (iii) fetal and infant growth measured by weight and length at birth, after 1 month and then at 3, 6, 9, and 24 months, (iv) hemoglobin concentration in children and mothers. Relevance for programs and public health: The results from this study can suggest new dietary guidelines for South Asian women that again can lead to improved pregnancy outcomes and neurodevelopment and cognitive functioning in South Asian children.\n\nDetailed Description\nCobalamin (Vitamin B12) deficiency is common in many low- and middle-income countries. This is not surprising as the main source of vitamin B12 is animal source foods, which are expensive and for cultural and religious reasons often not eaten at all. We have in several studies in women and children demonstrated that poor vitamin B12 status is common in South Asia. There is also compelling evidence that vitamin B12 deficiency occurs frequently in many other settings including pregnant women . Case studies have demonstrated harmful effects of severe vitamin B12 deficiency on the developing infant brain.The consequences of mild or subclinical vitamin deficiency are less clear but it has been shown to be associated with decreased cognitive performance in both elderly and children. Three randomized controlled trials (RCT) have measured the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on neurodevelopment in children: In a Norwegian trial, an intramuscular injection of B12 substantially improved motor development in six weeks old infants after one month. Another intervention study in low birth weight children in Norway recently confirmed these findings. The infants in these studies had evidence of suboptimal vitamin B12 status, but none were severely deficient. We found a beneficial effect of vitamin B12 supplementation for six months on neurodevelopment in young North Indian children. During pregnancy, vitamin B12 is concentrated in the fetus and stored in the liver. Infants born to vitamin B12-replete mothers have stores of vitamin B12 that are adequate to sustain them for the first several months postpartum. Consequently, vitamin B12 deficiency rarely occurs before the infant is about four months old if the mother has adequate vitamin B12 status during pregnancy. However, many infants of vitamin B12-deficient breastfeeding mothers are vulnerable to B12 deficiency from an early age. In this project we will randomise Nepalese women to receive a supplement containing 50\u00b5g cobalamin or a placebo from early pregnancy until 6 months postpartum. Hypothesis to be tested Principal hypothesis: Daily administration of vitamin B12 to pregnant women from early pregnancy until 6 months postpartum will: 1. Increase the scores of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd ed. (Bayley-III) by 0.25 SD points measured at 6 and 12 months of age. 2. Increase length for age and weight for length by 0.2 z-scores at 12 months of age. Other hypotheses to be tested (dependent on additional funding): 1. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from the start of the early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves the hemoglobin concentration in the mother and infant. 2. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves plasma vitamin B12 concentration and reduces plasma total homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentration in the mother and infant. 3. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves insulin sensitivity in the offspring.", 
    "endDate": "2021-12-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "id": "sg:clinicaltrial.NCT03071666", 
    "keywords": [
      "evidence", 
      "pregnant woman", 
      "Postpartum Period", 
      "store", 
      "consequence", 
      "intramuscular injection", 
      "micronutrient deficiency", 
      "setting", 
      "age", 
      "infant growth", 
      "scientific basis", 
      "Case Report", 
      "central nervous system", 
      "South Asia", 
      "Vitamin B 12", 
      "principal hypothesis", 
      "ED", 
      "infant brain", 
      "Indian", 
      "intervention study", 
      "comparator", 
      "randomized controlled trial", 
      "cognitive performance", 
      "old infant", 
      "liver", 
      "B12 deficiency", 
      "intervention", 
      "offspring", 
      "animal source", 
      "South Asians", 
      "score", 
      "double blind placebo", 
      "Norwegian", 
      "weight", 
      "homocysteine", 
      "Vitamin B 12 Deficiency", 
      "hypothesise", 
      "pregnancy outcome", 
      "z-score", 
      "supplementation", 
      "mother", 
      "study participant", 
      "SD", 
      "harmful effect", 
      "supplement", 
      "low birth-weight", 
      "early pregnancy", 
      "relevant source", 
      "beneficial effect", 
      "infant", 
      "gestational age", 
      "acid", 
      "motor development", 
      "fetus", 
      "Norway", 
      "additional funding", 
      "insulin resistance", 
      "vitamin", 
      "main source", 
      "pregnancy", 
      "compelling evidence", 
      "normal cell division", 
      "myelination", 
      "absorption", 
      "neurodevelopment", 
      "early age", 
      "Parturition", 
      "public health", 
      "development", 
      "early childhood", 
      "Nutrition Policy", 
      "start", 
      "study design", 
      "risk", 
      "hemoglobin concentration", 
      "woman", 
      "deficiency", 
      "child", 
      "daily", 
      "Weight and Measure", 
      "placebo", 
      "low- and middle-income country", 
      "B12", 
      "gut function"
    ], 
    "name": "Supplementation of Vitamin B12 in Pregnancy and Postpartum on Growth and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial", 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT03071666"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "clinical_trials", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T15:27", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "file:///pack/app/us_ct_data_00023.json", 
    "sponsor": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.7914.b", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.80817.36", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.429382.6", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.418790.3", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }
    ], 
    "startDate": "2017-03-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "subjectOf": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.113.187278", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001054315"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.111.032268", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001920539"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0129915", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1004368558"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1159/000345589", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1006286475"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2008.00031.x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009848081"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.061549", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013144364"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-1848", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019705973"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2013.09.015", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032690767"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.059592", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033405928"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1177/15648265080292s105", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043193410"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00125-007-0793-y", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047473115", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-007-0793-y"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00125-007-0793-y", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047473115", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-007-0793-y"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090079", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050008451"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/86.5.1302", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1077514748"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016434", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1091386547"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "type": "MedicalStudy", 
    "url": "https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT03071666"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT03071666'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT03071666'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT03071666'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT03071666'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

155 TRIPLES      16 PREDICATES      117 URIs      93 LITERALS      1 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:clinicaltrial.NCT03071666 schema:about anzsrc-for:3158
2 anzsrc-for:3177
3 schema:description Scientific basis: Globally, vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies. The only relevant source of vitamin B12 is animal-source foods and poor gut function may decrease absorption. Vitamin B12 is crucial for normal cell division and differentiation, and necessary for the development and myelination of the central nervous system. Deficiency is also associated with impaired fetal and infant growth. In the proposed study we will measure the effect of daily oral vitamin B12 supplementation to pregnant women on neurodevelopment and growth of their children. We also aim to measure the impact of B12 supplementation on several other outcomes. Study design: Individually randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial in pregnant South Asian women at risk of poor vitamin B12 status. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio. Study participants and site: 600 pregnant women from early pregnancy. Women will be enrolled as early as possible, but no later than in week 15 of pregnancy. Intervention: Daily administration of 50 µg of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy until 6 months after birth. Comparator: Placebo, identical to the vitamin B12 supplements. Outcomes: Primary: (i) neurodevelopment in children measured at 6 and 12 months of age (ii) growth in children measured by weight and length at 12 months. Secondary: (i) neurodevelopment and cognitive functioning in children at 24 months (ii) gestational age at birth, (iii) fetal and infant growth measured by weight and length at birth, after 1 month and then at 3, 6, 9, and 24 months, (iv) hemoglobin concentration in children and mothers. Relevance for programs and public health: The results from this study can suggest new dietary guidelines for South Asian women that again can lead to improved pregnancy outcomes and neurodevelopment and cognitive functioning in South Asian children. Detailed Description Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) deficiency is common in many low- and middle-income countries. This is not surprising as the main source of vitamin B12 is animal source foods, which are expensive and for cultural and religious reasons often not eaten at all. We have in several studies in women and children demonstrated that poor vitamin B12 status is common in South Asia. There is also compelling evidence that vitamin B12 deficiency occurs frequently in many other settings including pregnant women . Case studies have demonstrated harmful effects of severe vitamin B12 deficiency on the developing infant brain.The consequences of mild or subclinical vitamin deficiency are less clear but it has been shown to be associated with decreased cognitive performance in both elderly and children. Three randomized controlled trials (RCT) have measured the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on neurodevelopment in children: In a Norwegian trial, an intramuscular injection of B12 substantially improved motor development in six weeks old infants after one month. Another intervention study in low birth weight children in Norway recently confirmed these findings. The infants in these studies had evidence of suboptimal vitamin B12 status, but none were severely deficient. We found a beneficial effect of vitamin B12 supplementation for six months on neurodevelopment in young North Indian children. During pregnancy, vitamin B12 is concentrated in the fetus and stored in the liver. Infants born to vitamin B12-replete mothers have stores of vitamin B12 that are adequate to sustain them for the first several months postpartum. Consequently, vitamin B12 deficiency rarely occurs before the infant is about four months old if the mother has adequate vitamin B12 status during pregnancy. However, many infants of vitamin B12-deficient breastfeeding mothers are vulnerable to B12 deficiency from an early age. In this project we will randomise Nepalese women to receive a supplement containing 50µg cobalamin or a placebo from early pregnancy until 6 months postpartum. Hypothesis to be tested Principal hypothesis: Daily administration of vitamin B12 to pregnant women from early pregnancy until 6 months postpartum will: 1. Increase the scores of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd ed. (Bayley-III) by 0.25 SD points measured at 6 and 12 months of age. 2. Increase length for age and weight for length by 0.2 z-scores at 12 months of age. Other hypotheses to be tested (dependent on additional funding): 1. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from the start of the early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves the hemoglobin concentration in the mother and infant. 2. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves plasma vitamin B12 concentration and reduces plasma total homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentration in the mother and infant. 3. Daily maternal administration of vitamin B12 from early pregnancy and for 6 months postpartum improves insulin sensitivity in the offspring.
4 schema:endDate 2021-12-01T00:00:00Z
5 schema:keywords B12
6 B12 deficiency
7 Case Report
8 ED
9 Indian
10 Norway
11 Norwegian
12 Nutrition Policy
13 Parturition
14 Postpartum Period
15 SD
16 South Asia
17 South Asians
18 Vitamin B 12
19 Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
20 Weight and Measure
21 absorption
22 acid
23 additional funding
24 age
25 animal source
26 beneficial effect
27 central nervous system
28 child
29 cognitive performance
30 comparator
31 compelling evidence
32 consequence
33 daily
34 deficiency
35 development
36 double blind placebo
37 early age
38 early childhood
39 early pregnancy
40 evidence
41 fetus
42 gestational age
43 gut function
44 harmful effect
45 hemoglobin concentration
46 homocysteine
47 hypothesise
48 infant
49 infant brain
50 infant growth
51 insulin resistance
52 intervention
53 intervention study
54 intramuscular injection
55 liver
56 low birth-weight
57 low- and middle-income country
58 main source
59 micronutrient deficiency
60 mother
61 motor development
62 myelination
63 neurodevelopment
64 normal cell division
65 offspring
66 old infant
67 placebo
68 pregnancy
69 pregnancy outcome
70 pregnant woman
71 principal hypothesis
72 public health
73 randomized controlled trial
74 relevant source
75 risk
76 scientific basis
77 score
78 setting
79 start
80 store
81 study design
82 study participant
83 supplement
84 supplementation
85 vitamin
86 weight
87 woman
88 z-score
89 schema:name Supplementation of Vitamin B12 in Pregnancy and Postpartum on Growth and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial
90 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT03071666
91 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T15:27
92 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
93 schema:sdPublisher Nb6b501e3a2944b9f9c3c37e03c001b24
94 schema:sponsor https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.418790.3
95 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.429382.6
96 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.7914.b
97 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.80817.36
98 schema:startDate 2017-03-01T00:00:00Z
99 schema:subjectOf sg:pub.10.1007/s00125-007-0793-y
100 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2013.09.015
101 https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/86.5.1302
102 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2008.00031.x
103 https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016434
104 https://doi.org/10.1159/000345589
105 https://doi.org/10.1177/15648265080292s105
106 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090079
107 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0129915
108 https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-1848
109 https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.111.032268
110 https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.059592
111 https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.061549
112 https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.113.187278
113 schema:url https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT03071666
114 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
115 sgo:sdDataset clinical_trials
116 rdf:type schema:MedicalStudy
117 Nb6b501e3a2944b9f9c3c37e03c001b24 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
118 rdf:type schema:Organization
119 anzsrc-for:3158 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
120 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
121 anzsrc-for:3177 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
122 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
123 sg:pub.10.1007/s00125-007-0793-y schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047473115
124 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-007-0793-y
125 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
126 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2013.09.015 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032690767
127 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
128 https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/86.5.1302 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1077514748
129 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
130 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2008.00031.x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009848081
131 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
132 https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016434 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1091386547
133 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
134 https://doi.org/10.1159/000345589 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1006286475
135 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
136 https://doi.org/10.1177/15648265080292s105 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043193410
137 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
138 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090079 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050008451
139 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
140 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0129915 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1004368558
141 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
142 https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-1848 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019705973
143 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
144 https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.111.032268 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001920539
145 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
146 https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.059592 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033405928
147 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
148 https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.061549 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013144364
149 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
150 https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.113.187278 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001054315
151 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
152 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.418790.3 schema:Organization
153 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.429382.6 schema:Organization
154 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.7914.b schema:Organization
155 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.80817.36 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...