Effects of Ancient Grains-based Diet in a Closed Community View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2017-2017

ABSTRACT

Recently it has been reported that a consistent percentage of the general population consider themselves to be suffering from problems caused by wheat and/or gluten ingestion, even though they do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy. This clinical condition has been named Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity' (NCGS). In a previous paper the investigators suggested the term 'Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity' (NCWS), since it is not known what component of wheat causes the symptoms in NCGS patients, and the investigators also showed that these patients had a high frequency of coexistent multiple food hypersensitivity. It is also believed that this condition is worldwide increasing, due to the evolution of wheat breeding (i.e. consumption of wheats with high gluten content), and that "ancient" wheat flour varieties are better tolerated by NCWS patients than the "modern" ones. This effect could be related to a lower immunogenic stimulation of the ancient wheat than the modern ones. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a diet based on ancient grains in a "closed" community (i.e. nuns from enclosed religious order) as regard to 1) main haematochemical parameters and vitamins, 2) intestinal microbiota (bacterial flora), and 3) cytokines production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), before and after the diet period (30 days) with ancient grains. Detailed Description Recently it has been reported that a consistent percentage of the general population consider themselves to be suffering from problems caused by wheat and/or gluten ingestion, even though they do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy. This clinical condition has been named Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity' (NCGS). In a previous paper the investigators suggested the term 'Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity' (NCWS), since it is not known what component of wheat causes the symptoms in NCGS patients, and the investigators also showed that these patients had a high frequency of coexistent multiple food hypersensitivity. Therefore, NCWS pathogenesis has been attributed to very different mechanisms: innate or adaptive immunity, non IgE-mediated food allergy, amylase/trypsine inhibitors pro-inflammatory effects, incomplete digestion and/or absorption of fermentable oligosaccharides and disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols, and, finally, psychological effect. The clinical picture of NCWS is characterized by combined gastrointestinal (bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea and/or constipation, nausea, epigastric pain, gastroesophageal reflux, aphthous stomatitis) and extra-intestinal and/or systemic manifestations (headache, depression, anxiety, 'foggy mind,' tiredness, dermatitis or skin rash, fibromyalgia-like joint/muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, and anemia). It is also believed that this condition is worldwide increasing, due to the evolution of wheat breeding (i.e. consumption of wheats with high gluten content), and that "ancient" wheat flour varieties are better tolerated by NCWS patients than the "modern" ones. More in details, it has been demonstrated that in patients with NCWS foods containing modern (i.e. "Manitoba") wheat flour varieties may trigger immunological mechanisms of inflammation (i.e. CXCL10 secretion) and may alter intestinal permeability; on the contrary, these effects was not observed with wheat flour from ancient (i.e. "Kamut" or "Senatore Cappelli") varieties. Therefore, the aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a diet based on ancient grains (i.e. a mixture of "Tumminia", "Perciasacchi", "Senatore-Cappelli" and "Margherito" grains) in a "closed" community (i.e. nuns from enclosed religious order) as regard to: 1) main haematochemical parameters and vitamins (serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, blood glucose, serum sodium, total cholesterol, glycated hemoglobin, vitamin B12, and vitamin D), 2) intestinal microbiota (bacterial flora), and 3) cytokines production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), before and after the diet period (30 days) with ancient grains. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT03020511

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