Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation for Treatment of Premature Ovarian Insufficiency View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2016-2018

ABSTRACT

Currently, There is no treatment for Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are found in the ovary. VSELs are able to regenerate the affected ovary. Stimulation was achieved by injection of mesenchymal stem cells that is supposed to secrete trophic factors. Numerous studies in mice have proved the efficacy of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in resuming the ovarian function after chemotherapy-induced ovarian insufficiency. Allogeneic BMT raised the moral conflict about the origin of the newly developed oocytes. Several small studies examined the use of autologous BMT both in animal and in human. The results of these studies were promising. Intravenous injection is simpler and less invasive than ovarian injection as the later involves the use of laparoscopy. However, intravenous injection has not tested until now. Detailed Description Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) has no curative treatment until now. It was noticed that some cases of POI to recover spontaneously. Furthermore, the concept of fixed prenatal pool of oogonia has been challenged and postnatal neo-oogenesis is currently proved. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are found in the ovary. VSELs are stem cells that have noticed to survive chemotherapy induced gonadal insufficiency. Data from animal studies showed that stimulation of these stem cells result in regeneration of the affected ovary. Stimulation was achieved by injection of mesenchymal stem cells that is supposed to secrete trophic factors. Numerous studies in mice have proved the efficacy of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in resuming the ovarian function after chemotherapy-induced ovarian insufficiency. These studies have been followed by researches on human being. Human studies included the use of stem cells from different sites including BM, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord. Allogeneic BMT raised the moral conflict about the origin of the newly developed oocytes. Although studies proved that these newly developed oocytes to be genetically traced to the recipient; some other studies showed that the newly developed oocytes originate from the donor BM. Several small studies examined the use of autologous BMT both in animal and in human. The results of these studies were promising. Use of autologous BMT also avoids the need for chemotherapy for conditioning and other related complications associated with allogeneic BMT. Human studies mostly used the ovarian injection of the BM. Intravenous injection is simpler and less invasive than ovarian injection as the later involves the use of laparoscopy. However, intravenous injection has not tested until now. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02779374

Related SciGraph Publications

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3158", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "description": "Currently, There is no treatment for Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are found in the ovary. VSELs are able to regenerate the affected ovary. Stimulation was achieved by injection of mesenchymal stem cells that is supposed to secrete trophic factors. Numerous studies in mice have proved the efficacy of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in resuming the ovarian function after chemotherapy-induced ovarian insufficiency. Allogeneic BMT raised the moral conflict about the origin of the newly developed oocytes. Several small studies examined the use of autologous BMT both in animal and in human. The results of these studies were promising. Intravenous injection is simpler and less invasive than ovarian injection as the later involves the use of laparoscopy. However, intravenous injection has not tested until now.\n\nDetailed Description\nPremature ovarian insufficiency (POI) has no curative treatment until now. It was noticed that some cases of POI to recover spontaneously. Furthermore, the concept of fixed prenatal pool of oogonia has been challenged and postnatal neo-oogenesis is currently proved. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are found in the ovary. VSELs are stem cells that have noticed to survive chemotherapy induced gonadal insufficiency. Data from animal studies showed that stimulation of these stem cells result in regeneration of the affected ovary. Stimulation was achieved by injection of mesenchymal stem cells that is supposed to secrete trophic factors. Numerous studies in mice have proved the efficacy of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in resuming the ovarian function after chemotherapy-induced ovarian insufficiency. These studies have been followed by researches on human being. Human studies included the use of stem cells from different sites including BM, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord. Allogeneic BMT raised the moral conflict about the origin of the newly developed oocytes. Although studies proved that these newly developed oocytes to be genetically traced to the recipient; some other studies showed that the newly developed oocytes originate from the donor BM. Several small studies examined the use of autologous BMT both in animal and in human. The results of these studies were promising. Use of autologous BMT also avoids the need for chemotherapy for conditioning and other related complications associated with allogeneic BMT. Human studies mostly used the ovarian injection of the BM. Intravenous injection is simpler and less invasive than ovarian injection as the later involves the use of laparoscopy. However, intravenous injection has not tested until now.", 
    "endDate": "2018-06-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "id": "sg:clinicaltrial.NCT02779374", 
    "keywords": [
      "autologous bone marrow transplantation", 
      "insufficiency", 
      "stem cell", 
      "VSELs", 
      "ovary", 
      "stimulation", 
      "injection", 
      "Mesenchymal Stromal Cell", 
      "trophic factor", 
      "Numerous study", 
      "mouse", 
      "efficacy", 
      "bone marrow transplantation", 
      "ovarian function", 
      "allogeneic bone marrow transplantation", 
      "conflict", 
      "origin", 
      "oocyte", 
      "small study", 
      "animal", 
      "intravenous injection", 
      "simpler", 
      "Laparoscopy", 
      "curative treatment", 
      "concept", 
      "pool", 
      "oogenesis", 
      "animal study", 
      "cell result", 
      "regeneration", 
      "human study", 
      "different site", 
      "BM", 
      "adipose tissue", 
      "umbilical cord", 
      "recipient", 
      "avoids", 
      "Drug Therapy", 
      "conditioning", 
      "related complication"
    ], 
    "name": "Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation for Treatment of Premature Ovarian Insufficiency", 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT02779374"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "clinical_trials", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T15:26", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "file:///pack/app/us_ct_data_00021.json", 
    "sponsor": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.412707.7", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }
    ], 
    "startDate": "2016-07-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "subjectOf": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.11.009", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002815724"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2006.10.3028", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1008569897"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0032462", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009843082"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dev181", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032387794"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/s0015-0282(01)02987-9", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034669760"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/s13048-015-0199-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038080307", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/s13048-015-0199-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1089/cell.2011.0066", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078541778"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "type": "MedicalStudy", 
    "url": "https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02779374"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02779374'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02779374'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02779374'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02779374'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

81 TRIPLES      16 PREDICATES      62 URIs      49 LITERALS      1 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:clinicaltrial.NCT02779374 schema:about anzsrc-for:3158
2 schema:description Currently, There is no treatment for Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are found in the ovary. VSELs are able to regenerate the affected ovary. Stimulation was achieved by injection of mesenchymal stem cells that is supposed to secrete trophic factors. Numerous studies in mice have proved the efficacy of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in resuming the ovarian function after chemotherapy-induced ovarian insufficiency. Allogeneic BMT raised the moral conflict about the origin of the newly developed oocytes. Several small studies examined the use of autologous BMT both in animal and in human. The results of these studies were promising. Intravenous injection is simpler and less invasive than ovarian injection as the later involves the use of laparoscopy. However, intravenous injection has not tested until now. Detailed Description Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) has no curative treatment until now. It was noticed that some cases of POI to recover spontaneously. Furthermore, the concept of fixed prenatal pool of oogonia has been challenged and postnatal neo-oogenesis is currently proved. Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are found in the ovary. VSELs are stem cells that have noticed to survive chemotherapy induced gonadal insufficiency. Data from animal studies showed that stimulation of these stem cells result in regeneration of the affected ovary. Stimulation was achieved by injection of mesenchymal stem cells that is supposed to secrete trophic factors. Numerous studies in mice have proved the efficacy of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in resuming the ovarian function after chemotherapy-induced ovarian insufficiency. These studies have been followed by researches on human being. Human studies included the use of stem cells from different sites including BM, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord. Allogeneic BMT raised the moral conflict about the origin of the newly developed oocytes. Although studies proved that these newly developed oocytes to be genetically traced to the recipient; some other studies showed that the newly developed oocytes originate from the donor BM. Several small studies examined the use of autologous BMT both in animal and in human. The results of these studies were promising. Use of autologous BMT also avoids the need for chemotherapy for conditioning and other related complications associated with allogeneic BMT. Human studies mostly used the ovarian injection of the BM. Intravenous injection is simpler and less invasive than ovarian injection as the later involves the use of laparoscopy. However, intravenous injection has not tested until now.
3 schema:endDate 2018-06-01T00:00:00Z
4 schema:keywords BM
5 Drug Therapy
6 Laparoscopy
7 Mesenchymal Stromal Cell
8 Numerous study
9 VSELs
10 adipose tissue
11 allogeneic bone marrow transplantation
12 animal
13 animal study
14 autologous bone marrow transplantation
15 avoids
16 bone marrow transplantation
17 cell result
18 concept
19 conditioning
20 conflict
21 curative treatment
22 different site
23 efficacy
24 human study
25 injection
26 insufficiency
27 intravenous injection
28 mouse
29 oocyte
30 oogenesis
31 origin
32 ovarian function
33 ovary
34 pool
35 recipient
36 regeneration
37 related complication
38 simpler
39 small study
40 stem cell
41 stimulation
42 trophic factor
43 umbilical cord
44 schema:name Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation for Treatment of Premature Ovarian Insufficiency
45 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT02779374
46 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T15:26
47 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
48 schema:sdPublisher N0a1268eaadb7495584792db3324a24f0
49 schema:sponsor https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.412707.7
50 schema:startDate 2016-07-01T00:00:00Z
51 schema:subjectOf sg:pub.10.1186/s13048-015-0199-2
52 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.11.009
53 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0015-0282(01)02987-9
54 https://doi.org/10.1089/cell.2011.0066
55 https://doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dev181
56 https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2006.10.3028
57 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0032462
58 schema:url https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02779374
59 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
60 sgo:sdDataset clinical_trials
61 rdf:type schema:MedicalStudy
62 N0a1268eaadb7495584792db3324a24f0 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
63 rdf:type schema:Organization
64 anzsrc-for:3158 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
65 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
66 sg:pub.10.1186/s13048-015-0199-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038080307
67 https://doi.org/10.1186/s13048-015-0199-2
68 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
69 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.11.009 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002815724
70 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
71 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0015-0282(01)02987-9 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034669760
72 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
73 https://doi.org/10.1089/cell.2011.0066 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078541778
74 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
75 https://doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dev181 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032387794
76 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
77 https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2006.10.3028 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1008569897
78 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
79 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0032462 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009843082
80 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
81 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.412707.7 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...