Exploring the Feasibility, Acceptability, and Effectiveness of a Mosque-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity in South Asian Muslim Women: A ... View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2014-2015

ABSTRACT

South Asian (SA) women living in Ontario have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD) compared to the general population. Various explanations for these differences have been established, one of which is based on low levels of physical activity in people of SA origin, particularly in Muslim women. This pilot trial will test the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a Mosque-based exercise and educational intervention designed for SA Muslim women. 1. What is the feasibility of a mosque-based intervention to promote physical activity that is culturally and gender sensitive to South Asian Muslim women? 2. What is the acceptability of a mosque-based intervention to promote physical activity that is culturally and gender sensitive to South Asian Muslim women? 3. What is the effectiveness of a mosque-based intervention to promote physical activity that is culturally and gender sensitive to South Asian Muslim women? Detailed Description South Asian (SA) women (people with origins in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh or Sri Lanka) living in Ontario have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD) compared to the general population. Various explanations for these differences have been established, one of which is based on low levels of physical activity in people of SA origin, particularly in Muslim women. Studies suggest that they participate in less physical activity or recreational exercise compared to other SA women. Practical barriers (e.g. lack of time, childcare) are often interwoven with cultural barriers, such as restrictions leaving the home alone to enter mixed-gender settings, and lack of socialization into sporting and other outdoor activities) inhibit participation. The provision of culturally and gender sensitive facilities, such as women-only exercise sessions at mosques could serve as a solution for Ontario SA Muslim women to be more active. Studies indicate health promotion programs in religious institutions (e.g. churches) have demonstrated clinical and psychosocial benefit to women of various ethnic groups. Similar to Canadian churches, mosques have key elements identified in the literature to be beneficial in providing physical activity opportunities for Muslim women: partnerships, available and accessible space and supportive social relationships. To the investigators' knowledge, mosque-based physical activity interventions for SA Muslim women have not been implemented and evaluated in Ontario. Such interventions are needed to help attenuate the risk of diabetes and CHD in this ethnic group who represent a significant part of the Ontario population. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02124967

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