Implementing Comprehensive PMTCT and HIV Prevention for South African Couples View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2014-2018

ABSTRACT

This study will test the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention to increase Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) protocol uptake among South African HIV positive pregnant women. This study will also determine whether the participation of male partners will have additional positive impact on PMTCT uptake. The intervention will utilize a combination of both gender-concordant groups and individual or couples counseling strategies, before and after birth. During antenatal care, the intervention will use a gender-concordant group format to address PMTCT information, HIV disclosure, coping with stigma, intimate partner violence, and adherence to the overall PMTCT protocol. Just prior to birth and following birth, the intervention will shift to individual or couples-based counseling, targeting medication adherence, safer infant feeding, and family planning. It is hypothesized that women attending the intervention will be more likely to properly take HIV medication before birth and provide it to their infants. Additionally, it is hypothesized that male partner involvement will further increase the likelihood that mothers will take their HIV medication as prescribed and provide it to their infants. Detailed Description Abstract. In rural South Africa, only two-thirds of HIV+ pregnant women seeking antenatal care at community health centers took full advantage of available "prevention of mother-to-child transmission" (PMTCT) services in 2010 (SADOH). While engagement of male partners has been encouraged as a potential means of increasing PMTCT uptake, men have been reluctant to accompany their wives/partners to antenatal care. Recent studies generally support male involvement in promoting PMTCT, but the nature and impact of that involvement is unclear and untested. It is also clear that factors such as stigma, disclosure and intimate partner violence pose significant barriers to PMTCT uptake and retention in care, suggesting that male involvement may be "necessary, but not sufficient" to accomplish the WHO goal of <5% infant HIV incidence. Additional measures may be needed to increase participation by HIV positive pregnant women in PMTCT. In 2011, Mpumalanga Province had the highest rates of HIV in the country (36.7%) and rates of infant HIV incidence in rural clinics ranged up to 50%. Rates of PMTCT uptake in the Province have been among the lowest in South Africa (69%). This application proposes to expand on a successful PEPFAR- supported, PMTCT couples intervention pilot study conducted in Mpumalanga Province, ("Vikela Umndeni: Protect Your Family") to include a more representative population of HIV positive pregnant women and their partners, the primary objective being to determine whether male partner involvement plus a behavioral intervention would significantly reduce infant HIV incidence by increasing levels of adherence to ARV/ PMTCT protocols, including breastfeeding and family planning, during the antenatal and post-natal periods. The proposed study will enroll two cohorts of HIV positive pregnant women recruited from 12 randomly assigned Community Health Centers (6 experimental, 6 control): a) Women attending without their male partners (n = 720), followed by b) Women attending with their male partners (n = 720 couples), to determine whether the influence of male participation itself or combined with a behavioral PMTCT intervention can significantly reduce infant HIV infection ante-, peri- and post-natally. It is our intention to significantly increase PMTCT participation from current levels (69%) in Mpumalanga Province to 90-95% through engaging women and couples in a unique, controlled, six session ante- and post-natal risk-reducing/PMTCT promotion intervention addressing the barriers to PMTCT (e.g., stigma, disclosure, intimate partner violence, communication, infant feeding practices, safer conception) that prevent women and men from taking full advantage of the treatment opportunities available to them and their infants. Based upon the encouraging preliminary results from our pilot study, successful CHC adoption of the "Vikela Umndeni: Protect Your Family" program could have major public health policy implications for containing the epidemic among the most vulnerable populations in rural South Africa: HIV+ pregnant women and their infants. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02085356

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3177", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "description": "This study will test the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention to increase Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) protocol uptake among South African HIV positive pregnant women. This study will also determine whether the participation of male partners will have additional positive impact on PMTCT uptake. The intervention will utilize a combination of both gender-concordant groups and individual or couples counseling strategies, before and after birth. During antenatal care, the intervention will use a gender-concordant group format to address PMTCT information, HIV disclosure, coping with stigma, intimate partner violence, and adherence to the overall PMTCT protocol. Just prior to birth and following birth, the intervention will shift to individual or couples-based counseling, targeting medication adherence, safer infant feeding, and family planning. It is hypothesized that women attending the intervention will be more likely to properly take HIV medication before birth and provide it to their infants. Additionally, it is hypothesized that male partner involvement will further increase the likelihood that mothers will take their HIV medication as prescribed and provide it to their infants.\n\nDetailed Description\nAbstract. In rural South Africa, only two-thirds of HIV+ pregnant women seeking antenatal care at community health centers took full advantage of available \"prevention of mother-to-child transmission\" (PMTCT) services in 2010 (SADOH). While engagement of male partners has been encouraged as a potential means of increasing PMTCT uptake, men have been reluctant to accompany their wives/partners to antenatal care. Recent studies generally support male involvement in promoting PMTCT, but the nature and impact of that involvement is unclear and untested. It is also clear that factors such as stigma, disclosure and intimate partner violence pose significant barriers to PMTCT uptake and retention in care, suggesting that male involvement may be \"necessary, but not sufficient\" to accomplish the WHO goal of <5% infant HIV incidence. Additional measures may be needed to increase participation by HIV positive pregnant women in PMTCT. In 2011, Mpumalanga Province had the highest rates of HIV in the country (36.7%) and rates of infant HIV incidence in rural clinics ranged up to 50%. Rates of PMTCT uptake in the Province have been among the lowest in South Africa (69%). This application proposes to expand on a successful PEPFAR- supported, PMTCT couples intervention pilot study conducted in Mpumalanga Province, (\"Vikela Umndeni: Protect Your Family\") to include a more representative population of HIV positive pregnant women and their partners, the primary objective being to determine whether male partner involvement plus a behavioral intervention would significantly reduce infant HIV incidence by increasing levels of adherence to ARV/ PMTCT protocols, including breastfeeding and family planning, during the antenatal and post-natal periods. The proposed study will enroll two cohorts of HIV positive pregnant women recruited from 12 randomly assigned Community Health Centers (6 experimental, 6 control): a) Women attending without their male partners (n = 720), followed by b) Women attending with their male partners (n = 720 couples), to determine whether the influence of male participation itself or combined with a behavioral PMTCT intervention can significantly reduce infant HIV infection ante-, peri- and post-natally. It is our intention to significantly increase PMTCT participation from current levels (69%) in Mpumalanga Province to 90-95% through engaging women and couples in a unique, controlled, six session ante- and post-natal risk-reducing/PMTCT promotion intervention addressing the barriers to PMTCT (e.g., stigma, disclosure, intimate partner violence, communication, infant feeding practices, safer conception) that prevent women and men from taking full advantage of the treatment opportunities available to them and their infants. Based upon the encouraging preliminary results from our pilot study, successful CHC adoption of the \"Vikela Umndeni: Protect Your Family\" program could have major public health policy implications for containing the epidemic among the most vulnerable populations in rural South Africa: HIV+ pregnant women and their infants.", 
    "endDate": "2018-11-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "id": "sg:clinicaltrial.NCT02085356", 
    "keywords": [
      "Protect", 
      "potential mean", 
      "involvement", 
      "counseling", 
      "rural South Africa", 
      "woman", 
      "participation", 
      "mother", 
      "engagement", 
      "full advantage", 
      "HIV medication", 
      "stigma", 
      "implementing", 
      "significant barrier", 
      "male partner", 
      "intimate partner violence", 
      "retention", 
      "care", 
      "cohort", 
      "province", 
      "HIV incidence", 
      "attending", 
      "public health policy", 
      "adherence", 
      "treatment opportunity", 
      "post-natally", 
      "current level", 
      "coping", 
      "preliminary result", 
      "disclosure", 
      "family program", 
      "period", 
      "behavioral intervention", 
      "safe", 
      "Weight and Measure", 
      "infant", 
      "group format", 
      "South Africa", 
      "barrier", 
      "Family Planning Service", 
      "likelihood", 
      "communication", 
      "pregnant woman", 
      "South Africans", 
      "antenatal care", 
      "uptake", 
      "medication adherence", 
      "Parturition", 
      "individual", 
      "nature", 
      "HIV prevention", 
      "shift", 
      "increase participation", 
      "DESCRIPTION Abstract", 
      "partner", 
      "Recent study", 
      "Pilot Project", 
      "intention", 
      "service", 
      "practice", 
      "HIV-positive pregnant woman", 
      "mother-to-child transmission", 
      "representative population", 
      "high rate", 
      "HIV disclosure", 
      "men", 
      "HIV", 
      "intervention", 
      "control", 
      "PMTCT", 
      "country", 
      "session", 
      "HIV infection", 
      "protocol", 
      "positive impact", 
      "community health center", 
      "vulnerable population", 
      "prevention of mother-to-child transmission", 
      "adoption", 
      "rural clinic", 
      "family", 
      "primary objective"
    ], 
    "name": "Implementing Comprehensive PMTCT and HIV Prevention for South African Couples", 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT02085356"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "clinical_trials", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T15:25", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "file:///pack/app/us_ct_data_00016.json", 
    "sponsor": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.417715.1", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26790.3a", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420089.7", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }
    ], 
    "startDate": "2014-04-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "subjectOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1745-6215-15-417", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001387980", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-15-417"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/s12981-017-0187-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1099689813", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/s12981-017-0187-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/s12981-017-0187-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1099689813", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/s12981-017-0187-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10461-018-2197-z", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1105010390", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2197-z"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10461-018-2197-z", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1105010390", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2197-z"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "type": "MedicalStudy", 
    "url": "https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02085356"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02085356'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02085356'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02085356'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT02085356'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

117 TRIPLES      16 PREDICATES      102 URIs      91 LITERALS      1 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:clinicaltrial.NCT02085356 schema:about anzsrc-for:3177
2 schema:description This study will test the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention to increase Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) protocol uptake among South African HIV positive pregnant women. This study will also determine whether the participation of male partners will have additional positive impact on PMTCT uptake. The intervention will utilize a combination of both gender-concordant groups and individual or couples counseling strategies, before and after birth. During antenatal care, the intervention will use a gender-concordant group format to address PMTCT information, HIV disclosure, coping with stigma, intimate partner violence, and adherence to the overall PMTCT protocol. Just prior to birth and following birth, the intervention will shift to individual or couples-based counseling, targeting medication adherence, safer infant feeding, and family planning. It is hypothesized that women attending the intervention will be more likely to properly take HIV medication before birth and provide it to their infants. Additionally, it is hypothesized that male partner involvement will further increase the likelihood that mothers will take their HIV medication as prescribed and provide it to their infants. Detailed Description Abstract. In rural South Africa, only two-thirds of HIV+ pregnant women seeking antenatal care at community health centers took full advantage of available "prevention of mother-to-child transmission" (PMTCT) services in 2010 (SADOH). While engagement of male partners has been encouraged as a potential means of increasing PMTCT uptake, men have been reluctant to accompany their wives/partners to antenatal care. Recent studies generally support male involvement in promoting PMTCT, but the nature and impact of that involvement is unclear and untested. It is also clear that factors such as stigma, disclosure and intimate partner violence pose significant barriers to PMTCT uptake and retention in care, suggesting that male involvement may be "necessary, but not sufficient" to accomplish the WHO goal of <5% infant HIV incidence. Additional measures may be needed to increase participation by HIV positive pregnant women in PMTCT. In 2011, Mpumalanga Province had the highest rates of HIV in the country (36.7%) and rates of infant HIV incidence in rural clinics ranged up to 50%. Rates of PMTCT uptake in the Province have been among the lowest in South Africa (69%). This application proposes to expand on a successful PEPFAR- supported, PMTCT couples intervention pilot study conducted in Mpumalanga Province, ("Vikela Umndeni: Protect Your Family") to include a more representative population of HIV positive pregnant women and their partners, the primary objective being to determine whether male partner involvement plus a behavioral intervention would significantly reduce infant HIV incidence by increasing levels of adherence to ARV/ PMTCT protocols, including breastfeeding and family planning, during the antenatal and post-natal periods. The proposed study will enroll two cohorts of HIV positive pregnant women recruited from 12 randomly assigned Community Health Centers (6 experimental, 6 control): a) Women attending without their male partners (n = 720), followed by b) Women attending with their male partners (n = 720 couples), to determine whether the influence of male participation itself or combined with a behavioral PMTCT intervention can significantly reduce infant HIV infection ante-, peri- and post-natally. It is our intention to significantly increase PMTCT participation from current levels (69%) in Mpumalanga Province to 90-95% through engaging women and couples in a unique, controlled, six session ante- and post-natal risk-reducing/PMTCT promotion intervention addressing the barriers to PMTCT (e.g., stigma, disclosure, intimate partner violence, communication, infant feeding practices, safer conception) that prevent women and men from taking full advantage of the treatment opportunities available to them and their infants. Based upon the encouraging preliminary results from our pilot study, successful CHC adoption of the "Vikela Umndeni: Protect Your Family" program could have major public health policy implications for containing the epidemic among the most vulnerable populations in rural South Africa: HIV+ pregnant women and their infants.
3 schema:endDate 2018-11-01T00:00:00Z
4 schema:keywords DESCRIPTION Abstract
5 Family Planning Service
6 HIV
7 HIV disclosure
8 HIV incidence
9 HIV infection
10 HIV medication
11 HIV prevention
12 HIV-positive pregnant woman
13 PMTCT
14 Parturition
15 Pilot Project
16 Protect
17 Recent study
18 South Africa
19 South Africans
20 Weight and Measure
21 adherence
22 adoption
23 antenatal care
24 attending
25 barrier
26 behavioral intervention
27 care
28 cohort
29 communication
30 community health center
31 control
32 coping
33 counseling
34 country
35 current level
36 disclosure
37 engagement
38 family
39 family program
40 full advantage
41 group format
42 high rate
43 implementing
44 increase participation
45 individual
46 infant
47 intention
48 intervention
49 intimate partner violence
50 involvement
51 likelihood
52 male partner
53 medication adherence
54 men
55 mother
56 mother-to-child transmission
57 nature
58 participation
59 partner
60 period
61 positive impact
62 post-natally
63 potential mean
64 practice
65 pregnant woman
66 preliminary result
67 prevention of mother-to-child transmission
68 primary objective
69 protocol
70 province
71 public health policy
72 representative population
73 retention
74 rural South Africa
75 rural clinic
76 safe
77 service
78 session
79 shift
80 significant barrier
81 stigma
82 treatment opportunity
83 uptake
84 vulnerable population
85 woman
86 schema:name Implementing Comprehensive PMTCT and HIV Prevention for South African Couples
87 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT02085356
88 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T15:25
89 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
90 schema:sdPublisher N194799aa14c7422e8d780dce64e4974c
91 schema:sponsor https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26790.3a
92 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.417715.1
93 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420089.7
94 schema:startDate 2014-04-01T00:00:00Z
95 schema:subjectOf sg:pub.10.1007/s10461-018-2197-z
96 sg:pub.10.1186/1745-6215-15-417
97 sg:pub.10.1186/s12981-017-0187-2
98 schema:url https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02085356
99 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
100 sgo:sdDataset clinical_trials
101 rdf:type schema:MedicalStudy
102 N194799aa14c7422e8d780dce64e4974c schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
103 rdf:type schema:Organization
104 anzsrc-for:3177 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
105 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
106 sg:pub.10.1007/s10461-018-2197-z schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1105010390
107 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2197-z
108 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
109 sg:pub.10.1186/1745-6215-15-417 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001387980
110 https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-15-417
111 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
112 sg:pub.10.1186/s12981-017-0187-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1099689813
113 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12981-017-0187-2
114 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
115 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26790.3a schema:Organization
116 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.417715.1 schema:Organization
117 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420089.7 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...