Preventing Childhood Obesity Through Early Feeding and Parenting Guidance View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2012-2017

ABSTRACT

The goal of this study is to compare the effectiveness of structured CHW- provided home visits, using an intervention created through community-based participatory research, to standard care received through WIC office visits in preventing the development of overweight (weight/length >85th percentile) and obesity (weight/length >95th percentile) in infants during their first 2 years of life. Hypothesis 1: Children in the intervention group will remain within their growth centiles in height/weight and weight for age, while children in the control group will increase in height/weight percentiles and weight percentiles more rapidly (> .67 SD) during the first year of life. Hypothesis 2: Fewer children who receive the intervention will have BMI >95th percentile at ages 2 and 3 than the children in the control group. Hypothesis 3: Children who receive the intervention will exclusively breastfeed for a longer period of time than will children in the control group. Hypothesis 4: Children who receive the intervention will have a higher percentage of fruits and vegetables and a lower percentage of sweetened beverages, desserts, and candy in their diets at ages 1, 2, and 3, than will children in the control group. Hypothesis 5: Parents in the intervention group will be more responsive to infant feeding cues (hunger, satiety)than parents in the control group. Detailed Description Along with birth weight and parental body size, infant feeding is recognized as one of the most influential biological and environmental factors that affect weight gain during infancy. Parental feeding practices have a strong impact on children's food availability, eating behaviors, and weight. The Institute of Medicine's(IOM) recent report (2011) on early childhood obesity prevention policies recommends five approaches to preventing obesity: assess, monitor, and track growth from birth to age 5; increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior in young children; support breastfeeding and be responsive to children's feeding cues; limit screen time; and promote age-appropriate sleep for young children. Based on the previous work by this research team, and in collaboration with a major urban health department, we propose to test an intervention that incorporates all the IOM's recommendations to prevent the development of obesity in at-risk infants. The intervention will be guided by health professionals and delivered through home visits by community health workers (CHWs), supervised by public health nurses (PHN), to Mexican American women and children who are clients of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program in Houston, TX. The intervention will occur for 2 years with 1 year of follow-up, for a total of 3 years of measures. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01905072

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