Reducing CVD Risk in Caregivers: A Brief Behavioral Activation Intervention View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2008-2013

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular disease and depression are some of the most costly illnesses to society, and caring for a loved-one with Alzheimer's disease has been associated with increased risk for both depression and cardiovascular disease. Indeed, depressive symptoms have been linked with elevated plasma concentrations of D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6), both of which are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The present research tests a brief behavioral intervention for reducing both depressive symptoms and CVD biomarkers in Alzheimer caregivers. We hypothesize that caregivers receiving a brief Behavioral Activation (BA) therapy will show greater reductions in depressive symptoms and in CVD biomarkers relative to those randomized to a time-equivalent Information and Support (IS) therapy. Detailed Description Due to an aging society, the number of people diagnosed with dementia is expected to increase dramatically over the next two decades, with a concomitant rise in the number of family members providing informal care for their loved ones. The stresses associated with this care have been well-documented in the scientific literature, and are noted to be associated with increased risk for psychological and physical morbidity, particularly cardiovascular disease. Indeed, caregiving is associated with elevations in negative affect (e.g., depressive and anxiety symptoms), which in turn is associated with biological indicators that are thought to predict CVD risk (e.g., markers of coagulation and inflammation). The primary goal of this study is to examine the efficacy of a brief Behavioral Activation (BA) Treatment, called the Pleasant Events Program (PEP), for reducing biological CVD risk indicators in a sample of Alzheimer caregivers. We will enroll 100 dementia caregivers and randomly assign them to receive 4-sessions of PEP or 4-sessions of support + information. Our PEP intervention will be conducted in caregivers' homes and will emphasize the importance of monitoring and increasing activities that help individuals make contact with natural reinforcers in their environments, identifying and reducing negative coping responses, and selection and achievement of behavioral goals for healthier living. Caregivers will be assessed for our biological outcomes at baseline, post-treatment, and 1-year to determine intervention efficacy. Given the brief nature of the PEP intervention, the ease with which it can be applied in real-world settings (e.g., community agencies providing services to caregivers), and lack of difficult skills for interventionists and caregivers to acquire, we believe our PEP intervention will be easily transferred to "real-world" settings. If our PEP intervention is efficacious, it may have a considerable impact on both the physical and mental health of caregivers, and will likely have public health implications. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01802554

Related SciGraph Publications

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3177", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3468", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "description": "Cardiovascular disease and depression are some of the most costly illnesses to society, and caring for a loved-one with Alzheimer's disease has been associated with increased risk for both depression and cardiovascular disease. Indeed, depressive symptoms have been linked with elevated plasma concentrations of D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6), both of which are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The present research tests a brief behavioral intervention for reducing both depressive symptoms and CVD biomarkers in Alzheimer caregivers. We hypothesize that caregivers receiving a brief Behavioral Activation (BA) therapy will show greater reductions in depressive symptoms and in CVD biomarkers relative to those randomized to a time-equivalent Information and Support (IS) therapy.\n\nDetailed Description\nDue to an aging society, the number of people diagnosed with dementia is expected to increase dramatically over the next two decades, with a concomitant rise in the number of family members providing informal care for their loved ones. The stresses associated with this care have been well-documented in the scientific literature, and are noted to be associated with increased risk for psychological and physical morbidity, particularly cardiovascular disease. Indeed, caregiving is associated with elevations in negative affect (e.g., depressive and anxiety symptoms), which in turn is associated with biological indicators that are thought to predict CVD risk (e.g., markers of coagulation and inflammation). The primary goal of this study is to examine the efficacy of a brief Behavioral Activation (BA) Treatment, called the Pleasant Events Program (PEP), for reducing biological CVD risk indicators in a sample of Alzheimer caregivers. We will enroll 100 dementia caregivers and randomly assign them to receive 4-sessions of PEP or 4-sessions of support + information. Our PEP intervention will be conducted in caregivers' homes and will emphasize the importance of monitoring and increasing activities that help individuals make contact with natural reinforcers in their environments, identifying and reducing negative coping responses, and selection and achievement of behavioral goals for healthier living. Caregivers will be assessed for our biological outcomes at baseline, post-treatment, and 1-year to determine intervention efficacy. Given the brief nature of the PEP intervention, the ease with which it can be applied in real-world settings (e.g., community agencies providing services to caregivers), and lack of difficult skills for interventionists and caregivers to acquire, we believe our PEP intervention will be easily transferred to \"real-world\" settings. If our PEP intervention is efficacious, it may have a considerable impact on both the physical and mental health of caregivers, and will likely have public health implications.", 
    "endDate": "2013-02-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "id": "sg:clinicaltrial.NCT01802554", 
    "keywords": [
      "CVD risk", 
      "behavioral activation", 
      "cardiovascular disease", 
      "depression", 
      "illness", 
      "society", 
      "Alzheimer's", 
      "disease", 
      "increased risk", 
      "plasma concentration", 
      "D-dimer", 
      "Interleukin-6", 
      "present research", 
      "behavioral intervention", 
      "Alzheimer", 
      "caregiver", 
      "therapy", 
      "great reduction", 
      "Time", 
      "aging society", 
      "dementia", 
      "concomitant rise", 
      "family", 
      "patient care", 
      "stress", 
      "care", 
      "scientific literature", 
      "morbidity", 
      "caregiving", 
      "elevation", 
      "anxiety symptom", 
      "biological indicator", 
      "cardiovascular disease risk", 
      "marker", 
      "coagulation", 
      "inflammation", 
      "primary goal", 
      "efficacy", 
      "pleasant", 
      "sample", 
      "dementia caregiver", 
      "program intervention", 
      "individual", 
      "natural reinforcer", 
      "environment", 
      "coping response", 
      "selection", 
      "achievement", 
      "behavioral goal", 
      "biological outcome", 
      "baseline", 
      "post-treatment", 
      "intervention efficacy", 
      "nature", 
      "ease", 
      "real-world setting", 
      "community agency", 
      "service", 
      "skill", 
      "interventionists", 
      "considerable impact", 
      "physical and mental health", 
      "public health implication"
    ], 
    "name": "Reducing CVD Risk in Caregivers: A Brief Behavioral Activation Intervention", 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT01802554"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "clinical_trials", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T15:24", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "file:///pack/app/us_ct_data_00014.json", 
    "sponsor": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.266100.3", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }
    ], 
    "startDate": "2008-04-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "subjectOf": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2009.11.006", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007535065"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2011.615738", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011231252"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1017/s1041610211000512", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024445586"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029412", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024549464"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11920-011-0187-1", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1025756391", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-011-0187-1"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2011.04.004", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028771990"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2012.10.001", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034561634"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1037/a0027783", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037894620"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2011.637559", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039749267"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2013.07.005", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046371443"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2010.11.004", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051089880"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "type": "MedicalStudy", 
    "url": "https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01802554"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01802554'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01802554'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01802554'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01802554'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

119 TRIPLES      16 PREDICATES      90 URIs      72 LITERALS      1 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:clinicaltrial.NCT01802554 schema:about anzsrc-for:3177
2 anzsrc-for:3468
3 schema:description Cardiovascular disease and depression are some of the most costly illnesses to society, and caring for a loved-one with Alzheimer's disease has been associated with increased risk for both depression and cardiovascular disease. Indeed, depressive symptoms have been linked with elevated plasma concentrations of D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6), both of which are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The present research tests a brief behavioral intervention for reducing both depressive symptoms and CVD biomarkers in Alzheimer caregivers. We hypothesize that caregivers receiving a brief Behavioral Activation (BA) therapy will show greater reductions in depressive symptoms and in CVD biomarkers relative to those randomized to a time-equivalent Information and Support (IS) therapy. Detailed Description Due to an aging society, the number of people diagnosed with dementia is expected to increase dramatically over the next two decades, with a concomitant rise in the number of family members providing informal care for their loved ones. The stresses associated with this care have been well-documented in the scientific literature, and are noted to be associated with increased risk for psychological and physical morbidity, particularly cardiovascular disease. Indeed, caregiving is associated with elevations in negative affect (e.g., depressive and anxiety symptoms), which in turn is associated with biological indicators that are thought to predict CVD risk (e.g., markers of coagulation and inflammation). The primary goal of this study is to examine the efficacy of a brief Behavioral Activation (BA) Treatment, called the Pleasant Events Program (PEP), for reducing biological CVD risk indicators in a sample of Alzheimer caregivers. We will enroll 100 dementia caregivers and randomly assign them to receive 4-sessions of PEP or 4-sessions of support + information. Our PEP intervention will be conducted in caregivers' homes and will emphasize the importance of monitoring and increasing activities that help individuals make contact with natural reinforcers in their environments, identifying and reducing negative coping responses, and selection and achievement of behavioral goals for healthier living. Caregivers will be assessed for our biological outcomes at baseline, post-treatment, and 1-year to determine intervention efficacy. Given the brief nature of the PEP intervention, the ease with which it can be applied in real-world settings (e.g., community agencies providing services to caregivers), and lack of difficult skills for interventionists and caregivers to acquire, we believe our PEP intervention will be easily transferred to "real-world" settings. If our PEP intervention is efficacious, it may have a considerable impact on both the physical and mental health of caregivers, and will likely have public health implications.
4 schema:endDate 2013-02-01T00:00:00Z
5 schema:keywords Alzheimer
6 Alzheimer's
7 CVD risk
8 D-dimer
9 Interleukin-6
10 Time
11 achievement
12 aging society
13 anxiety symptom
14 baseline
15 behavioral activation
16 behavioral goal
17 behavioral intervention
18 biological indicator
19 biological outcome
20 cardiovascular disease
21 cardiovascular disease risk
22 care
23 caregiver
24 caregiving
25 coagulation
26 community agency
27 concomitant rise
28 considerable impact
29 coping response
30 dementia
31 dementia caregiver
32 depression
33 disease
34 ease
35 efficacy
36 elevation
37 environment
38 family
39 great reduction
40 illness
41 increased risk
42 individual
43 inflammation
44 intervention efficacy
45 interventionists
46 marker
47 morbidity
48 natural reinforcer
49 nature
50 patient care
51 physical and mental health
52 plasma concentration
53 pleasant
54 post-treatment
55 present research
56 primary goal
57 program intervention
58 public health implication
59 real-world setting
60 sample
61 scientific literature
62 selection
63 service
64 skill
65 society
66 stress
67 therapy
68 schema:name Reducing CVD Risk in Caregivers: A Brief Behavioral Activation Intervention
69 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT01802554
70 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T15:24
71 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
72 schema:sdPublisher Ne91abd434e2a43d58be3c1f8a934e4a9
73 schema:sponsor https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.266100.3
74 schema:startDate 2008-04-01T00:00:00Z
75 schema:subjectOf sg:pub.10.1007/s11920-011-0187-1
76 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2009.11.006
77 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2010.11.004
78 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2013.07.005
79 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2011.04.004
80 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2012.10.001
81 https://doi.org/10.1017/s1041610211000512
82 https://doi.org/10.1037/a0027783
83 https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029412
84 https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2011.637559
85 https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2011.615738
86 schema:url https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01802554
87 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
88 sgo:sdDataset clinical_trials
89 rdf:type schema:MedicalStudy
90 Ne91abd434e2a43d58be3c1f8a934e4a9 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
91 rdf:type schema:Organization
92 anzsrc-for:3177 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
93 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
94 anzsrc-for:3468 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
95 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
96 sg:pub.10.1007/s11920-011-0187-1 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1025756391
97 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-011-0187-1
98 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
99 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2009.11.006 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007535065
100 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
101 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2010.11.004 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051089880
102 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
103 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2013.07.005 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046371443
104 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
105 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2011.04.004 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028771990
106 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
107 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2012.10.001 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034561634
108 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
109 https://doi.org/10.1017/s1041610211000512 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024445586
110 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
111 https://doi.org/10.1037/a0027783 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037894620
112 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
113 https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029412 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024549464
114 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
115 https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2011.637559 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039749267
116 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
117 https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2011.615738 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011231252
118 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
119 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.266100.3 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...