Dietary Seaweed and Early Breast Cancer: A Randomized Trial View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2006-2007

ABSTRACT

Could daily consumption of seaweed help explain lower postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) incidence and mortality rates in Japan? This small proof of principle clinical trial was designed to test the idea that the same amount of seaweed normally eaten in Japan would induce metabolic changes when given to non-seaweed consuming healthy postmenopausal American women. The participants were given 10 capsules a day (about 1 tablespoon) for 3 months. During the first month the capsules contained placebo, the second month seaweed, and the third month placebo. We collected blood and urine samples after each treatment period and tested for changes in protein expression that might be related to consuming seaweed. Detailed Description The relationship between the relative breast cancer (BC) risk and seaweed intake among humans is only now unfolding. A small body of research, both in vivo and in vitro, suggests seaweed may be useful in BC prevention (Funahashi et al. 1999; Teas et al. 1984; Yamamoto et al. 1987) . Seaweeds are specifically used to treat tumors in Traditional Chinese Medicine and Japanese folk medicine. On a population level, those people for whom seaweed is a regular part of their diet, most notably in Japan, have dramatically lower rates of BC (Hebert et al. 1998; Hebert and Rosen 1996; Kodama et al. 1991). Epidemiologic studies done in Japan in the 1980s, before Westernized diets were common, reported that Japanese women had 1/3 the rate of premenopausal BC and 1/9 the rate of postmenopausal BC (Ferlay et al. 2001; Reddy et al. 1980). Even today, BC incidence rates for women in Japan are 20/100,000 compared to the U.S. average of 118/100,000 (Statistics 2007) . Although genetic predisposition has been proposed, when rates among migrants from Japan to the US are compared, BC incidence almost doubles after 10 years of residence in the US (20/100,000 to 35/100,000) (Shimizu et al. 1991), increase with each successive generation (LeMarchand et al. 1985). Japanese-American women who develop BC have significantly better survival rates than other American ethnic groups (Kanemori and Prygrocki 2005; Pineda et al. 2001). On the other hand, Asian-American women over 50 years of age living in Los Angeles, especially Japanese-American women, have one of the most rapidly increasing BC incidence rates (Deapen et al. 2002). These data support the hypothesis that lifestyle changes and possibly gene-nutrient interactions are important in BC susceptibility. Seaweed is a typical part of East-Asian diets, although consumption varies widely among individuals (Fukuda et al. 2007). Seaweeds have no land equivalents in terms of their specific components of fiber (alginate), primary carotenoid (fucoxanthin), sulfated polysaccharide (fucoidan and laminarin), and polyphenol defense compounds, each of which has been reported to have strong anti-cancer activity (Kotake-Nara et al. 2005; Koyanagi et al. 2003; Miao et al. 1999; Son et al. 2003). Many in vivo and in vitro studies of dietary seaweed report decreased angiogenesis and increased apoptosis of tumor cells (Konishi et al. 2006; Koyanagi et al. 2003; Sekiya et al. 2005), inhibition of tumor cell adhesion and metastasis (Liu et al. 2005) and enhanced immune responses (Maruyama et al. 2003; Maruyama et al. 2006). Nishino and colleagues have investigated seaweed modulation of the urokinase plasminogen system (Nishino et al. 1999; Nishino et al. 2000). Based on the wide range of antitumor effects, we investigated the possibility that seaweed could affect uPAR concentrations in women who consume seaweed. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, CD87), and its plasminogen inhibitors 1 and 2 are central to the maintenance of homeostasis, directly affecting the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammation, tissue repair. Increased concentrations have been shown to be associated with more rapid cancer progression (Foekens et al. 2000). Urinary concentration of uPAR is highly correlated with urinary uPA concentrations, and both are correlated with tissue concentration (Foekens et al. 2000; Sier et al. 2004).When uPA/uPAR concentrations are increased, there is increased ECM degradation that allows cancer cells to migrate, leading to metastases. Urokinase is also used therapeutically to treat serious conditions involving blood clots. In clinical studies, tissue concentration of uPA is an independent prognostic predictor of BC progression (Ceccarelli et al. 2010; Look et al. 2002). We therefore included evaluation of one part of the urokinase system, uPAR, in this study as a possible biomarker for seaweed activity that might be related to BC prevention. To further assess whether a dietary seaweed intervention could alter protein expression in urine and serum in a non-seaweed consuming population of healthy postmenopausal women, we used surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight coupled with mass spectrometer (SELDI-TOF-MS). Proteomic analyses have been used to identify cancer biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity, including those related to BC (Gast et al. 2008; Shimizu et al. 1991; van Winden et al. 2009). SELDI has also been shown to be sensitive enough to be used to identify changes in serum associated with the addition of a novel food (green tea) (Tsuneki et al. 2004). More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01663792

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3142", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "description": "Could daily consumption of seaweed help explain lower postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) incidence and mortality rates in Japan? This small proof of principle clinical trial was designed to test the idea that the same amount of seaweed normally eaten in Japan would induce metabolic changes when given to non-seaweed consuming healthy postmenopausal American women. The participants were given 10 capsules a day (about 1 tablespoon) for 3 months. During the first month the capsules contained placebo, the second month seaweed, and the third month placebo. We collected blood and urine samples after each treatment period and tested for changes in protein expression that might be related to consuming seaweed.\n\nDetailed Description\nThe relationship between the relative breast cancer (BC) risk and seaweed intake among humans is only now unfolding. A small body of research, both in vivo and in vitro, suggests seaweed may be useful in BC prevention (Funahashi et al. 1999; Teas et al. 1984; Yamamoto et al. 1987) . Seaweeds are specifically used to treat tumors in Traditional Chinese Medicine and Japanese folk medicine. On a population level, those people for whom seaweed is a regular part of their diet, most notably in Japan, have dramatically lower rates of BC (Hebert et al. 1998; Hebert and Rosen 1996; Kodama et al. 1991). Epidemiologic studies done in Japan in the 1980s, before Westernized diets were common, reported that Japanese women had 1/3 the rate of premenopausal BC and 1/9 the rate of postmenopausal BC (Ferlay et al. 2001; Reddy et al. 1980). Even today, BC incidence rates for women in Japan are 20/100,000 compared to the U.S. average of 118/100,000 (Statistics 2007) . Although genetic predisposition has been proposed, when rates among migrants from Japan to the US are compared, BC incidence almost doubles after 10 years of residence in the US (20/100,000 to 35/100,000) (Shimizu et al. 1991), increase with each successive generation (LeMarchand et al. 1985). Japanese-American women who develop BC have significantly better survival rates than other American ethnic groups (Kanemori and Prygrocki 2005; Pineda et al. 2001). On the other hand, Asian-American women over 50 years of age living in Los Angeles, especially Japanese-American women, have one of the most rapidly increasing BC incidence rates (Deapen et al. 2002). These data support the hypothesis that lifestyle changes and possibly gene-nutrient interactions are important in BC susceptibility. Seaweed is a typical part of East-Asian diets, although consumption varies widely among individuals (Fukuda et al. 2007). Seaweeds have no land equivalents in terms of their specific components of fiber (alginate), primary carotenoid (fucoxanthin), sulfated polysaccharide (fucoidan and laminarin), and polyphenol defense compounds, each of which has been reported to have strong anti-cancer activity (Kotake-Nara et al. 2005; Koyanagi et al. 2003; Miao et al. 1999; Son et al. 2003). Many in vivo and in vitro studies of dietary seaweed report decreased angiogenesis and increased apoptosis of tumor cells (Konishi et al. 2006; Koyanagi et al. 2003; Sekiya et al. 2005), inhibition of tumor cell adhesion and metastasis (Liu et al. 2005) and enhanced immune responses (Maruyama et al. 2003; Maruyama et al. 2006). Nishino and colleagues have investigated seaweed modulation of the urokinase plasminogen system (Nishino et al. 1999; Nishino et al. 2000). Based on the wide range of antitumor effects, we investigated the possibility that seaweed could affect uPAR concentrations in women who consume seaweed. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, CD87), and its plasminogen inhibitors 1 and 2 are central to the maintenance of homeostasis, directly affecting the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammation, tissue repair. Increased concentrations have been shown to be associated with more rapid cancer progression (Foekens et al. 2000). Urinary concentration of uPAR is highly correlated with urinary uPA concentrations, and both are correlated with tissue concentration (Foekens et al. 2000; Sier et al. 2004).When uPA/uPAR concentrations are increased, there is increased ECM degradation that allows cancer cells to migrate, leading to metastases. Urokinase is also used therapeutically to treat serious conditions involving blood clots. In clinical studies, tissue concentration of uPA is an independent prognostic predictor of BC progression (Ceccarelli et al. 2010; Look et al. 2002). We therefore included evaluation of one part of the urokinase system, uPAR, in this study as a possible biomarker for seaweed activity that might be related to BC prevention. To further assess whether a dietary seaweed intervention could alter protein expression in urine and serum in a non-seaweed consuming population of healthy postmenopausal women, we used surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight coupled with mass spectrometer (SELDI-TOF-MS). Proteomic analyses have been used to identify cancer biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity, including those related to BC (Gast et al. 2008; Shimizu et al. 1991; van Winden et al. 2009). SELDI has also been shown to be sensitive enough to be used to identify changes in serum associated with the addition of a novel food (green tea) (Tsuneki et al. 2004).", 
    "endDate": "2007-12-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "id": "sg:clinicaltrial.NCT01663792", 
    "keywords": [
      "early breast cancer", 
      "randomized trial", 
      "Economics", 
      "Breast Neoplasm", 
      "incidence", 
      "mortality", 
      "Japan", 
      "proof", 
      "clinical trial", 
      "idea", 
      "same amount", 
      "metabolic change", 
      "American woman", 
      "capsule", 
      "tablespoon", 
      "placebo", 
      "collected blood", 
      "urine sample", 
      "treatment period", 
      "protein expression", 
      "risk", 
      "seaweed", 
      "human", 
      "small body", 
      "vivo", 
      "vitro", 
      "breast cancer prevention", 
      "tea", 
      "Neoplasm", 
      "Chinese Traditional Medicine", 
      "medicine", 
      "population level", 
      "regular part", 
      "diet", 
      "low rate", 
      "Epidemiologic Study", 
      "Japanese woman", 
      "premenopausal breast cancer", 
      "postmenopausal breast cancer", 
      "reddy", 
      "breast cancer incidence rate", 
      "woman", 
      "average", 
      "Genetic Predisposition to Disease", 
      "Transient and Migrant", 
      "US", 
      "breast cancer incidence", 
      "residence", 
      "Shimizu", 
      "successive generation", 
      "good survival", 
      "ethnic group", 
      "Asian-American woman", 
      "age", 
      "Los Angeles", 
      "lifestyle change", 
      "nutrient", 
      "breast cancer susceptibility", 
      "East asian", 
      "individual", 
      "specific component", 
      "fiber", 
      "alginate", 
      "carotenoid", 
      "sulfated polysaccharide", 
      "polyphenols", 
      "anti-cancer activity", 
      "Nuclear Family", 
      "vitro study", 
      "angiogenesis", 
      "increased apoptosis", 
      "tumor cell", 
      "inhibition", 
      "tumor cell adhesion", 
      "Neoplasm Metastasis", 
      "Liu", 
      "enhanced immune response", 
      "colleague", 
      "modulation", 
      "plasminogen system", 
      "wide range", 
      "antitumor effect", 
      "possibility", 
      "uPAR", 
      "Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator", 
      "urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor", 
      "plasminogen", 
      "homeostasis", 
      "extracellular matrix", 
      "inflammation", 
      "tissue repair", 
      "increased concentration", 
      "cancer progression", 
      "urinary concentration", 
      "tissue concentration", 
      "receptor concentration", 
      "extracellular matrix degradation", 
      "cancer cell", 
      "serious condition", 
      "blood clot", 
      "clinical study", 
      "prognostic", 
      "breast cancer progression", 
      "Evaluation Study as Topic", 
      "possible biomarkers", 
      "intervention", 
      "urine", 
      "serum", 
      "population", 
      "healthy postmenopausal woman", 
      "surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization", 
      "flight", 
      "mass spectrometer", 
      "Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry", 
      "proteomic analysis", 
      "cancer biomarkers", 
      "high sensitivity", 
      "Sensitivity and Specificity", 
      "van", 
      "SELDI", 
      "novel food", 
      "green tea"
    ], 
    "name": "Dietary Seaweed and Early Breast Cancer: A Randomized Trial", 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT01663792"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "clinical_trials", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T15:24", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "file:///pack/app/us_ct_data_00013.json", 
    "sponsor": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411021.7", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420210.5", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.254567.7", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }
    ], 
    "startDate": "2006-10-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "subjectOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2210-4-18", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009137597", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2210-4-18"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1999.tb00836.x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009639265"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/s0065-230x(08)60363-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012441042"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602505", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014190681", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602505"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10549-008-0263-3", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014870482", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-008-0263-3"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(00)00289-9", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1018274366"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.10415", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024406432"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(99)00060-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024670011"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/30.5.976", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024821421"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1097-0215(19991029)83:3<424::aid-ijc20>3.0.co;2-l", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027597615"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2004.07.048", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028475933"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00432-009-0694-1", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033037291", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00432-009-0694-1"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00432-009-0694-1", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033037291", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00432-009-0694-1"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-2952(02)01478-8", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1035806391"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/bjc.1991.210", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1035931121", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.1991.210"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-3835(87)90033-4", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038603923"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10147-004-0469-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043515696", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10147-004-0469-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10147-004-0469-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043515696", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10147-004-0469-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2004.08.054", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043548167"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.1440", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043886019"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/94.2.116", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047094342"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf02980206", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047715123", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02980206"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1755-8794-2-4", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1048962964", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1755-8794-2-4"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpc.2005.10.005", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1053712806"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-951703", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1057467196"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2174/138161211796718233", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069167754"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1074590921", 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1075335495", 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1077112322", 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078189965", 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a114136", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1080088454"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1081738132", 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1082947540", 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "type": "MedicalStudy", 
    "url": "https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01663792"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01663792'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01663792'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01663792'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.NCT01663792'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

240 TRIPLES      16 PREDICATES      170 URIs      131 LITERALS      1 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:clinicaltrial.NCT01663792 schema:about anzsrc-for:3142
2 schema:description Could daily consumption of seaweed help explain lower postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) incidence and mortality rates in Japan? This small proof of principle clinical trial was designed to test the idea that the same amount of seaweed normally eaten in Japan would induce metabolic changes when given to non-seaweed consuming healthy postmenopausal American women. The participants were given 10 capsules a day (about 1 tablespoon) for 3 months. During the first month the capsules contained placebo, the second month seaweed, and the third month placebo. We collected blood and urine samples after each treatment period and tested for changes in protein expression that might be related to consuming seaweed. Detailed Description The relationship between the relative breast cancer (BC) risk and seaweed intake among humans is only now unfolding. A small body of research, both in vivo and in vitro, suggests seaweed may be useful in BC prevention (Funahashi et al. 1999; Teas et al. 1984; Yamamoto et al. 1987) . Seaweeds are specifically used to treat tumors in Traditional Chinese Medicine and Japanese folk medicine. On a population level, those people for whom seaweed is a regular part of their diet, most notably in Japan, have dramatically lower rates of BC (Hebert et al. 1998; Hebert and Rosen 1996; Kodama et al. 1991). Epidemiologic studies done in Japan in the 1980s, before Westernized diets were common, reported that Japanese women had 1/3 the rate of premenopausal BC and 1/9 the rate of postmenopausal BC (Ferlay et al. 2001; Reddy et al. 1980). Even today, BC incidence rates for women in Japan are 20/100,000 compared to the U.S. average of 118/100,000 (Statistics 2007) . Although genetic predisposition has been proposed, when rates among migrants from Japan to the US are compared, BC incidence almost doubles after 10 years of residence in the US (20/100,000 to 35/100,000) (Shimizu et al. 1991), increase with each successive generation (LeMarchand et al. 1985). Japanese-American women who develop BC have significantly better survival rates than other American ethnic groups (Kanemori and Prygrocki 2005; Pineda et al. 2001). On the other hand, Asian-American women over 50 years of age living in Los Angeles, especially Japanese-American women, have one of the most rapidly increasing BC incidence rates (Deapen et al. 2002). These data support the hypothesis that lifestyle changes and possibly gene-nutrient interactions are important in BC susceptibility. Seaweed is a typical part of East-Asian diets, although consumption varies widely among individuals (Fukuda et al. 2007). Seaweeds have no land equivalents in terms of their specific components of fiber (alginate), primary carotenoid (fucoxanthin), sulfated polysaccharide (fucoidan and laminarin), and polyphenol defense compounds, each of which has been reported to have strong anti-cancer activity (Kotake-Nara et al. 2005; Koyanagi et al. 2003; Miao et al. 1999; Son et al. 2003). Many in vivo and in vitro studies of dietary seaweed report decreased angiogenesis and increased apoptosis of tumor cells (Konishi et al. 2006; Koyanagi et al. 2003; Sekiya et al. 2005), inhibition of tumor cell adhesion and metastasis (Liu et al. 2005) and enhanced immune responses (Maruyama et al. 2003; Maruyama et al. 2006). Nishino and colleagues have investigated seaweed modulation of the urokinase plasminogen system (Nishino et al. 1999; Nishino et al. 2000). Based on the wide range of antitumor effects, we investigated the possibility that seaweed could affect uPAR concentrations in women who consume seaweed. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, CD87), and its plasminogen inhibitors 1 and 2 are central to the maintenance of homeostasis, directly affecting the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammation, tissue repair. Increased concentrations have been shown to be associated with more rapid cancer progression (Foekens et al. 2000). Urinary concentration of uPAR is highly correlated with urinary uPA concentrations, and both are correlated with tissue concentration (Foekens et al. 2000; Sier et al. 2004).When uPA/uPAR concentrations are increased, there is increased ECM degradation that allows cancer cells to migrate, leading to metastases. Urokinase is also used therapeutically to treat serious conditions involving blood clots. In clinical studies, tissue concentration of uPA is an independent prognostic predictor of BC progression (Ceccarelli et al. 2010; Look et al. 2002). We therefore included evaluation of one part of the urokinase system, uPAR, in this study as a possible biomarker for seaweed activity that might be related to BC prevention. To further assess whether a dietary seaweed intervention could alter protein expression in urine and serum in a non-seaweed consuming population of healthy postmenopausal women, we used surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight coupled with mass spectrometer (SELDI-TOF-MS). Proteomic analyses have been used to identify cancer biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity, including those related to BC (Gast et al. 2008; Shimizu et al. 1991; van Winden et al. 2009). SELDI has also been shown to be sensitive enough to be used to identify changes in serum associated with the addition of a novel food (green tea) (Tsuneki et al. 2004).
3 schema:endDate 2007-12-01T00:00:00Z
4 schema:keywords American woman
5 Asian-American woman
6 Breast Neoplasm
7 Chinese Traditional Medicine
8 East asian
9 Economics
10 Epidemiologic Study
11 Evaluation Study as Topic
12 Genetic Predisposition to Disease
13 Japan
14 Japanese woman
15 Liu
16 Los Angeles
17 Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry
18 Neoplasm
19 Neoplasm Metastasis
20 Nuclear Family
21 SELDI
22 Sensitivity and Specificity
23 Shimizu
24 Transient and Migrant
25 US
26 Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator
27 age
28 alginate
29 angiogenesis
30 anti-cancer activity
31 antitumor effect
32 average
33 blood clot
34 breast cancer incidence
35 breast cancer incidence rate
36 breast cancer prevention
37 breast cancer progression
38 breast cancer susceptibility
39 cancer biomarkers
40 cancer cell
41 cancer progression
42 capsule
43 carotenoid
44 clinical study
45 clinical trial
46 colleague
47 collected blood
48 diet
49 early breast cancer
50 enhanced immune response
51 ethnic group
52 extracellular matrix
53 extracellular matrix degradation
54 fiber
55 flight
56 good survival
57 green tea
58 healthy postmenopausal woman
59 high sensitivity
60 homeostasis
61 human
62 idea
63 incidence
64 increased apoptosis
65 increased concentration
66 individual
67 inflammation
68 inhibition
69 intervention
70 lifestyle change
71 low rate
72 mass spectrometer
73 medicine
74 metabolic change
75 modulation
76 mortality
77 novel food
78 nutrient
79 placebo
80 plasminogen
81 plasminogen system
82 polyphenols
83 population
84 population level
85 possibility
86 possible biomarkers
87 postmenopausal breast cancer
88 premenopausal breast cancer
89 prognostic
90 proof
91 protein expression
92 proteomic analysis
93 randomized trial
94 receptor concentration
95 reddy
96 regular part
97 residence
98 risk
99 same amount
100 seaweed
101 serious condition
102 serum
103 small body
104 specific component
105 successive generation
106 sulfated polysaccharide
107 surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization
108 tablespoon
109 tea
110 tissue concentration
111 tissue repair
112 treatment period
113 tumor cell
114 tumor cell adhesion
115 uPAR
116 urinary concentration
117 urine
118 urine sample
119 urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor
120 van
121 vitro
122 vitro study
123 vivo
124 wide range
125 woman
126 schema:name Dietary Seaweed and Early Breast Cancer: A Randomized Trial
127 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/NCT01663792
128 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T15:24
129 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
130 schema:sdPublisher Nd629c31bad6048658412cafaf1f539d0
131 schema:sponsor https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.254567.7
132 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411021.7
133 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420210.5
134 schema:startDate 2006-10-01T00:00:00Z
135 schema:subjectOf sg:pub.10.1007/bf02980206
136 sg:pub.10.1007/s00432-009-0694-1
137 sg:pub.10.1007/s10147-004-0469-2
138 sg:pub.10.1007/s10549-008-0263-3
139 sg:pub.10.1038/bjc.1991.210
140 sg:pub.10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602505
141 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2210-4-18
142 sg:pub.10.1186/1755-8794-2-4
143 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1074590921
144 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1075335495
145 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1077112322
146 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078189965
147 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1081738132
148 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1082947540
149 https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1097-0215(19991029)83:3<424::aid-ijc20>3.0.co;2-l
150 https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.10415
151 https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.1440
152 https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-3835(87)90033-4
153 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2004.07.048
154 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpc.2005.10.005
155 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2004.08.054
156 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-2952(02)01478-8
157 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(00)00289-9
158 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(99)00060-2
159 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0065-230x(08)60363-2
160 https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-951703
161 https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/30.5.976
162 https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/94.2.116
163 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a114136
164 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1999.tb00836.x
165 https://doi.org/10.2174/138161211796718233
166 schema:url https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01663792
167 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
168 sgo:sdDataset clinical_trials
169 rdf:type schema:MedicalStudy
170 Nd629c31bad6048658412cafaf1f539d0 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
171 rdf:type schema:Organization
172 anzsrc-for:3142 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
173 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
174 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02980206 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047715123
175 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02980206
176 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
177 sg:pub.10.1007/s00432-009-0694-1 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033037291
178 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00432-009-0694-1
179 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
180 sg:pub.10.1007/s10147-004-0469-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043515696
181 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10147-004-0469-2
182 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
183 sg:pub.10.1007/s10549-008-0263-3 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014870482
184 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-008-0263-3
185 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
186 sg:pub.10.1038/bjc.1991.210 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1035931121
187 https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.1991.210
188 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
189 sg:pub.10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602505 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014190681
190 https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602505
191 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
192 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2210-4-18 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009137597
193 https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2210-4-18
194 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
195 sg:pub.10.1186/1755-8794-2-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1048962964
196 https://doi.org/10.1186/1755-8794-2-4
197 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
198 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1074590921 schema:CreativeWork
199 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1075335495 schema:CreativeWork
200 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1077112322 schema:CreativeWork
201 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078189965 schema:CreativeWork
202 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1081738132 schema:CreativeWork
203 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1082947540 schema:CreativeWork
204 https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1097-0215(19991029)83:3<424::aid-ijc20>3.0.co;2-l schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027597615
205 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
206 https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.10415 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024406432
207 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
208 https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.1440 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043886019
209 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
210 https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-3835(87)90033-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038603923
211 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
212 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2004.07.048 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028475933
213 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
214 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpc.2005.10.005 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1053712806
215 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
216 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2004.08.054 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043548167
217 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
218 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-2952(02)01478-8 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1035806391
219 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
220 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(00)00289-9 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1018274366
221 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
222 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0049-3848(99)00060-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024670011
223 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
224 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0065-230x(08)60363-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012441042
225 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
226 https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-951703 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1057467196
227 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
228 https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/30.5.976 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024821421
229 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
230 https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/94.2.116 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047094342
231 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
232 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a114136 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1080088454
233 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
234 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1999.tb00836.x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009639265
235 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
236 https://doi.org/10.2174/138161211796718233 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069167754
237 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
238 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.254567.7 schema:Organization
239 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.411021.7 schema:Organization
240 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.420210.5 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...