Combination Prevention for Vulnerable Women in South Africa View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2012-2015

ABSTRACT

This study compares the effects of standard HIV test, treat and retain (TTR) practices with TTR plus a woman-focused enhanced strategy--Women's Health CoOp (WHC+) intervention) targeting hard-to-reach and vulnerable alcohol and other drug (AOD)-using women to determine if the WHC+ intervention is more efficacious than TTR alone in reducing HIV risk behavior. Additionally, the study will determine whether HIV positive women in the WHC+ arm are more likely to follow through with referrals for further medical evaluation and linkages to HIV treatment and other care than women in the TTR arm. Detailed Description There is growing recognition that no single strategy will be sufficient to eliminate transmission. In light of evidence that neither existing biomedical interventions nor any existing behavioral interventions will be sufficient to control the HIV epidemic in South Africa, the proposed study will combine a biomedical intervention with an evidence-based behavioral intervention (i.e., the Women's Health CoOp) to maximize the efficacy of both strategies. If this combination intervention proves efficacious, there is a high likelihood that it can be widely implemented, be sustainable and have a substantial public health impact by reducing the exceedingly high HIV incidence in South Africa. The overarching goal of the proposed research is to determine whether this enhanced combination prevention strategy targeting vulnerable AOD-using women is more efficacious than current standard practices. The specific aims of the proposed study are: Aim 1: To expand the WHC outreach strategies to reach more alcohol and other drug (AOD) - using vulnerable women in Pretoria, South Africa. Aim 2: To test whether adding WHC to standard Treat, Test, and Retain (TTR) practices results in more HIV-positive AOD-using women getting medical evaluations (e.g., cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4), viral load), starting treatment, staying in treatment and in greater reductions in risk behaviors (e.g., AOD use, condom use, victimization) among all women-positive or negative. The study uses a geographical cluster randomized design. Hotspots (i.e. places where sex workers and drug using women congregate) in the city of Pretoria and the surrounding areas were mapped using geographic information system (GIS) software. Fourteen hotspots were identified and geocoded. The entire area was divided into 14 zones, each of which included a hotspot. Seven matched pairs of zones were created based on socio-economic conditions and estimates of the numbers of sex workers and drug-using women residing in them. Zones within pairs were randomized to the TTR arm or the WHC+ arm. Participants are recruited by outreach workers and their intervention condition is based on the zone from which they were recruited. At study enrollment/baseline, eligible participants complete a questionnaire and baseline HIV, drug and pregnancy testing. Follow-up data collection will be conducted at 6-months and 12-months post-baseline. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01497405

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