Effectiveness of Telepsychiatry-based Culturally Sensitive Collaborative Treatment of Depressed Chinese Americans View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2009-2015

ABSTRACT

Hypothesis 1. Telepsychiatry consultations will be acceptable and well-received by depressed Chinese Americans and by their primary care clinicians. Hypothesis 2. Depressed Chinese Americans in remote primary care clinics receiving T-CSCT will have improved outcomes compared to patients who receive Usual Care by primary care physicians. Detailed Description Telepsychiatry-based CSCT (T-CSCT): Live and interactive Telepsychiatry (using videoconferencing) brings tremendous opportunities to clinical care, education, research, and administration. In the U.S. to date, telepsychiatry has been implemented in rural areas where people lack access to psychiatrists (Baer et al, 1997), in the Prison System with service users constrained from traveling (Brecht et al., 1996), in rural native American resettlement areas (Shore & Spero, 2005), and in Alaska where residents are faced with both distance and a shortage of mental health professionals. In this proposed study, we plan to investigate the effectiveness of telepsychiatry-based CSCT (T-CSCT) to provide culturally sensitive collaborative management of MDD to monolingual Chinese Americans. For this group of patients, telepsychiatry consultation could be a necessity both in urban as well as rural primary care clinics that are not staffed with bilingual psychiatrists. T-CSCT plans to utilize the advanced telemedicine technology in major academic centers to connect the scarce resource of bilingual and bicultural mental health professionals to underserved Chinese Americans to improve their access to treatment of MDD. T-CSCT will explore the usefulness and effectiveness of recognizing MDD subjects through consumer-initiated depression self-screening using the validated CB-PHQ-9, which will be made available in community newspapers, journals, and on the internet. To facilitate care management for Chinese Americans, a Depression Toolkit for Chinese Americans will be developed, which will include information on the nature and treatment of MDD, the CB-PHQ-9 for depression self-screening, a bilingual instrument to monitor progress of depressive symptoms, strategies for patients to negotiate with health professionals for individually tailored treatment for depression, and answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs) by Asian American immigrants on MDD and its treatment. If shown to be effective, the T-CSCT can be the prototype of a telemedicine-based Multiracial Mental Health Resource Center to provide services to other minority populations to reduce disparities in mental health treatment. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00854542

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