Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2003-2012

ABSTRACT

The objectives of this study are to develop a Culturally Tailored Genetic (CTGC) protocol for African American women and evaluate its impact on decision making and satisfaction about BRCA1/2 testing, quality of life, and cancer control practices compared to Standard Genetic Counseling (SGC). A secondary objective of this study is to identify African American women who are most and least likely to benefit from CTGC vs. SGC. Detailed Description Five to 10% of all breast cancer cases have been attributed to two breast ovarian cancer susceptibility genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2). Genetic counseling and testing for BRCA1/2 mutations is now available through clinical research programs using standard counseling protocols. The goal of pre test counseling is to facilitate informed decision making about whether to be tested and to prepare participants for possible outcomes. The goal of post test counseling is to provide information about risk status, recommendations for surveillance, and options for prevention. However, previous research suggests that African American and Caucasian women differ in their attitudes about and responses to pre test education and counseling. Increasingly, cultural beliefs and values are being recognized as important factors in genetic counseling. Despite recommendations to increase the cultural sensitivity of breast cancer risk counseling, such programs have not been developed or evaluated. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a Culturally Tailored Genetic Counseling (CTGC) protocol for African American women and evaluate its impact on psychological functioning and health behaviors compared with Standard Genetic Counseling (SGC) in a randomized clinical trial. 1. To evaluate the relative impact of CTGC vs. SGC on decision making and satisfaction about BRCA1/2 testing. Compared to SGC, CTGC will lead to higher rates of test acceptance and satisfaction with testing decisions. These effects will be mediated by increases in perceived benefits and decreases in perceived limitations and risks of genetic testing. 2. To evaluate the impact of CTGC vs. SGC on quality of life and health behaviors following BRCA1/2 testing. Compared to SGC, CTGC will lead to larger decreases in general and cancer specific distress, greater increases in adherence to cancer screening guidelines, and lower rates of prophylactic surgery. Reductions in psychological distress will be mediated by increased use of spiritual coping strategies. Secondary Aim To identify African American women who are most and least likely to benefit from CTGC vs. SGC. We predict that the relative benefits of CTGC will be greatest for women with greater endorsement of African American cultural values and those identified as BRCA1/2 carriers. More... »

URL

https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00419510

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