Protective ventilation during general anaesthesia for open abdominal surgery: a randomised controlled trial View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2010-2013

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims When abdominal surgery is carried out with general anesthesia (i.e., the patient is given a drug to make them unconscious), a machine called a ventilator must be used to assist or replace spontaneous breathing (mechanical ventilation). Mechanical ventilation may cause partial collapse of the lungs, a medical condition termed 'atelectasis'. Atelectasis can cause problems after surgery, sometimes leading to severe illness. Measures to prevent atelectasis were found to be beneficial in studies of mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients. It is uncertain whether such preventive measures also benefit patients undergoing surgery. This study compares two ventilation strategies. One generally used strategy uses low airway pressures; the other less frequently used strategy uses higher airway pressures. The strategy using lower pressures may lead to collapse of parts of the lung; the strategy using higher pressures may prevent partial lung collapse, but at the same time may cause low blood pressure, requiring infusion of more fluids and/or agents to maintain adequate blood pressures during surgery. We do not know which of these two ventilation strategies is the best. However, we think the strategy using higher pressures can protect against atelectasis and therefore protect against lung problems after surgery. Who can participate? Patients over 18 years of age who will be mechanically ventilated because of planned general anesthesia for abdominal surgery. Patients with an increased risk of lung problems after surgery are selected for this study. What does the study involve? Participants will be randomly allocated to be mechanically ventilated according to one of the two ventilation strategies (i.e., lower or higher airway pressure) throughout the surgical procedure. What are the possible benefits and risks of participating? You will not experience any discomfort because you will be under general anesthesia during mechanical ventilation. You will be closely monitored during and after surgery for up to 5 days. We cannot promise the study will help you, but the information we get from this study may benefit future patients. Where is the study run from? Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. This is an international trial in which up to 40 centers worldwide will participate. When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for? The study started recruiting patients in February 2011 and is expected to run until June 2013. Who is funding the study? European Society of Anesthesiology. Who is the main contact? SNT Hemmes, MD provhilotrial@gmail.com More... »

URL

http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN70332574

Related SciGraph Publications

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/3053", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "description": "Background and study aims\nWhen abdominal surgery is carried out with general anesthesia (i.e., the patient is given a drug to make them unconscious), a machine called a ventilator must be used to assist or replace spontaneous breathing (mechanical ventilation). Mechanical ventilation may cause partial collapse of the lungs, a medical condition termed 'atelectasis'. Atelectasis can cause problems after surgery, sometimes leading to severe illness. Measures to prevent atelectasis were found to be beneficial in studies of mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients. It is uncertain whether such preventive measures also benefit patients undergoing surgery. This study compares two ventilation strategies. One generally used strategy uses low airway pressures; the other less frequently used strategy uses higher airway pressures. The strategy using lower pressures may lead to collapse of parts of the lung; the strategy using higher pressures may prevent partial lung collapse, but at the same time may cause low blood pressure, requiring infusion of more fluids and/or agents to maintain adequate blood pressures during surgery. We do not know which of these two ventilation strategies is the best. However, we think the strategy using higher pressures can protect against  atelectasis and therefore protect against lung problems after surgery.\n\nWho can participate? \nPatients over 18 years of age who will be mechanically ventilated because of planned general anesthesia for abdominal surgery. Patients with an increased risk of lung problems after surgery are selected for this study. \n\nWhat does the study involve? \nParticipants will be randomly allocated to be mechanically ventilated according to one of the two ventilation strategies (i.e., lower or higher airway pressure) throughout the surgical procedure. \n\nWhat are the possible benefits and risks of participating? \nYou will not experience any discomfort because you will be under general anesthesia during mechanical ventilation. You will be closely monitored during and after surgery for up to 5 days. \nWe cannot promise the study will help you, but the information we get from this study may benefit future patients.\n\nWhere is the study run from? \nAcademic Medical Center, Amsterdam. This is an international trial in which up to 40 centers worldwide will participate.\n\nWhen is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for? \nThe study started recruiting patients in February 2011 and is expected to run until June 2013. \n\nWho is funding the study? \nEuropean Society of Anesthesiology.\n\nWho is the main contact? \nSNT Hemmes, MD\nprovhilotrial@gmail.com", 
    "endDate": "2013-04-30T00:00:00Z", 
    "id": "sg:clinicaltrial.ISRCTN70332574", 
    "keywords": [
      "Main", 
      "General Surgery", 
      "June", 
      "possible benefit", 
      "same time", 
      "hypotension", 
      "age", 
      "abdominal surgery", 
      "drug", 
      "Artificial Respiration", 
      "lung", 
      "fluid", 
      "medical condition", 
      "intensive care unit", 
      "Mechanical Ventilator", 
      "general anesthesia", 
      "academic medical center", 
      "ventilation", 
      "agent", 
      "international trial", 
      "future patient", 
      "low pressure", 
      "patient", 
      "collapse", 
      "Weight and Measure", 
      "European society", 
      "machine", 
      "Pulmonary Atelectasis", 
      "discomfort", 
      "MD", 
      "surgical procedure", 
      "blood pressure", 
      "lung problem", 
      "preventive measure", 
      "run", 
      "high pressure", 
      "February", 
      "airway pressure", 
      "severe illness", 
      "Amsterdam", 
      "risk", 
      "infusion", 
      "increased risk", 
      "benefit patient", 
      "worldwide"
    ], 
    "name": "Protective ventilation during general anaesthesia for open abdominal surgery: a randomised controlled trial", 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/ISRCTN70332574"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "clinical_trials", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-03-07T15:20", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "file:///pack/app/isrctn_ct_data_00001.json", 
    "sponsor": [
      {
        "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5650.6", 
        "type": "Organization"
      }
    ], 
    "startDate": "2010-12-01T00:00:00Z", 
    "subjectOf": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(14)60416-5", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046793829"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1745-6215-12-111", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050005375", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-12-111"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "type": "MedicalStudy", 
    "url": "http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN70332574"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.ISRCTN70332574'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.ISRCTN70332574'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.ISRCTN70332574'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/clinicaltrial.ISRCTN70332574'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

71 TRIPLES      16 PREDICATES      62 URIs      54 LITERALS      1 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:clinicaltrial.ISRCTN70332574 schema:about anzsrc-for:3053
2 schema:description Background and study aims When abdominal surgery is carried out with general anesthesia (i.e., the patient is given a drug to make them unconscious), a machine called a ventilator must be used to assist or replace spontaneous breathing (mechanical ventilation). Mechanical ventilation may cause partial collapse of the lungs, a medical condition termed 'atelectasis'. Atelectasis can cause problems after surgery, sometimes leading to severe illness. Measures to prevent atelectasis were found to be beneficial in studies of mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients. It is uncertain whether such preventive measures also benefit patients undergoing surgery. This study compares two ventilation strategies. One generally used strategy uses low airway pressures; the other less frequently used strategy uses higher airway pressures. The strategy using lower pressures may lead to collapse of parts of the lung; the strategy using higher pressures may prevent partial lung collapse, but at the same time may cause low blood pressure, requiring infusion of more fluids and/or agents to maintain adequate blood pressures during surgery. We do not know which of these two ventilation strategies is the best. However, we think the strategy using higher pressures can protect against atelectasis and therefore protect against lung problems after surgery. Who can participate? Patients over 18 years of age who will be mechanically ventilated because of planned general anesthesia for abdominal surgery. Patients with an increased risk of lung problems after surgery are selected for this study. What does the study involve? Participants will be randomly allocated to be mechanically ventilated according to one of the two ventilation strategies (i.e., lower or higher airway pressure) throughout the surgical procedure. What are the possible benefits and risks of participating? You will not experience any discomfort because you will be under general anesthesia during mechanical ventilation. You will be closely monitored during and after surgery for up to 5 days. We cannot promise the study will help you, but the information we get from this study may benefit future patients. Where is the study run from? Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. This is an international trial in which up to 40 centers worldwide will participate. When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for? The study started recruiting patients in February 2011 and is expected to run until June 2013. Who is funding the study? European Society of Anesthesiology. Who is the main contact? SNT Hemmes, MD provhilotrial@gmail.com
3 schema:endDate 2013-04-30T00:00:00Z
4 schema:keywords Amsterdam
5 Artificial Respiration
6 European society
7 February
8 General Surgery
9 June
10 MD
11 Main
12 Mechanical Ventilator
13 Pulmonary Atelectasis
14 Weight and Measure
15 abdominal surgery
16 academic medical center
17 age
18 agent
19 airway pressure
20 benefit patient
21 blood pressure
22 collapse
23 discomfort
24 drug
25 fluid
26 future patient
27 general anesthesia
28 high pressure
29 hypotension
30 increased risk
31 infusion
32 intensive care unit
33 international trial
34 low pressure
35 lung
36 lung problem
37 machine
38 medical condition
39 patient
40 possible benefit
41 preventive measure
42 risk
43 run
44 same time
45 severe illness
46 surgical procedure
47 ventilation
48 worldwide
49 schema:name Protective ventilation during general anaesthesia for open abdominal surgery: a randomised controlled trial
50 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/clinical_trial/ISRCTN70332574
51 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-03-07T15:20
52 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
53 schema:sdPublisher N27f7dc3712654200bdf00f074b1f1c3c
54 schema:sponsor https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5650.6
55 schema:startDate 2010-12-01T00:00:00Z
56 schema:subjectOf sg:pub.10.1186/1745-6215-12-111
57 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(14)60416-5
58 schema:url http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN70332574
59 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
60 sgo:sdDataset clinical_trials
61 rdf:type schema:MedicalStudy
62 N27f7dc3712654200bdf00f074b1f1c3c schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
63 rdf:type schema:Organization
64 anzsrc-for:3053 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
65 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
66 sg:pub.10.1186/1745-6215-12-111 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050005375
67 https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-12-111
68 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
69 https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(14)60416-5 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046793829
70 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
71 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5650.6 schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...