Don’t turn your back on the symptoms of psychosis: a proof-of-principle, quasi-experimental public health trial to reduce the duration of ... View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2012-2013

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims First-episode psychosis refers to the first time someone experiences psychotic symptoms or a psychotic episode. Young people are particularly vulnerable to developing psychosis; symptoms can be very disturbing and confusing and can include hallucinations, delusions and feelings of paranoia. Distress may be further increased by negative myths and stereotypes that are present in our society about mental illness. International studies have shown that some young people with psychosis can experience long delays in getting treatment (duration of untreated psychosis or DUP). Such delays can have important consequences for their treatment response and long-term outcome. The main sources of long delays are often due to poor help-seeking behaviour and delays within mental health services themselves, suggesting the need for greater focus on the sources of these delays in tackling them. The aim of this study is to reduce these long delays (or DUP) and improve the care pathways of young people experiencing first-episode psychosis by carrying out a psychosis awareness public health campaign which will run alongside a new ‘youth access’ mental health service. These interventions will provide information and guidance on when, where and how to seek help for psychosis, and provide a single referral point for young people with first-episode psychosis, to ensure they receive care from a youth sensitive team and guarantee direct access to a specialised service. Who can participate? The psychosis awareness campaign is aimed at young people (aged 14 – 30) in the south of Birmingham who may be experiencing symptoms of psychosis, their carers and those who work with young people, to raise awareness and provide information about when, where and how to seek help. Alongside provision of a bespoke youth mental health website (www.youthspace.me/psychosis) and a psychosis information line, the campaign will use media, advertising and community events to engage with the south Birmingham community, situating itself in local shopping centres, supermarkets and employment centres. It will also collaborate with youth, community and education groups. What does the study involve? The youth access team will operate alongside existing CMHTs in the south of Birmingham to provide direct referral channels and immediate assessments for all young people presenting to primary care with mental health difficulties. DUP and numbers of young people with first-episode psychosis entering the youth access team from the intervention area will be compared with the DUP and numbers of young people with first-episode psychosis entering services from the rest of Birmingham. What are the possible benefits and risks of participating? There are no risks from participation as DUP is routinely collected at entry into specialist services as part of initial assessments of all young people with first-episode psychosis. Where is the study run from? The awareness campaign and the youth access team are both based in south Birmingham and will operate as a pilot study which will inform a definitive trial. When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for? The study began in January 2012 and will run for 18 months. Who is funding the study? The study is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (UK). Who is the main contact? Dr Charlotte Connor c.s.connor@bham.ac.uk More... »

URL

http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN45058713

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