Folate Augmentation of Treatment - Evaluation for Depression: a randomised controlled trial View Homepage


Ontology type: schema:MedicalStudy     


Clinical Trial Info

YEARS

2006-2011

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims One in five people experience depression during their lives. Only half of those treated with drugs will get better; many others experience symptoms for a long time. The most common type of treatment for depression is a drug known as an antidepressant. These work by improving the way in which certain chemical messengers work in the brain. The vitamin called folate, found in foods such as green vegetables, helps to produce the chemicals used by these messengers in the brain. So low levels of folate, caused by poor diet or similar factors, may worsen or even cause depression, and may stop antidepressants from working as well as they should. This means that taking folate tablets could help treat depression. However, very few studies have been done to test this. This study will test whether giving a tablet of folate every day to people with depression will help their antidepressants work better. Who can participate? Patients aged 18 or over with moderate to severe depression What does the study involve? Participants are randomly allocated to take either a folate tablet or a dummy tablet for 3 months in addition to their antidepressant. To test whether folate tablets help antidepressants to work better, we assess whether those taking the tablets achieve better health. To do this we measure peoples' symptoms of depression at different times during the study. We also check their blood to see how much folate they have at different times during the study. We shall use some of the blood samples to see whether any genes affect the way folate helps treat depression. What are the possible benefits and risks of participating? Not provided at time of registration Where is the study run from? University of Wales Bangor (UK) When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for? October 2006 to June 2011 Who is funding the study? Health Technology Assessment Programme (UK) Who is the main contact? Prof. Ian Russell ian.russell@bangor.ac.uk More... »

URL

http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN37558856

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